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B RAHY 

OF THE 
U N IVER5 ITY 
Of ILLINOIS 

M58snH 
1920/21- 

1922/23 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/undergraduatecat2022east 



/SLI 



Michigan State Normal 
College Bulletin 



Volume X 



May, 1921 



Number 2 



$&■ 



CATALOG NUMBER 



'%. 




X?v* 



Ofi 



% 



1920-1921 



Published by the Normal College 
Ypsilanti, Michigan 



SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOG 



OF THE 



Michigan State Normal College 

For 1920-1921 



INCLUDING 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1921-1922 



AND 



Register of Students 



YPSILANTI, MICH. 
1921 



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1920 


1921 


1922 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


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5 


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7 


8 


9 


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2 


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14 


11 


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15 


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17 


9 


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22 


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23 


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26 


27 


28 


25 


26 


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28 


29 


30 


31 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


23 


27 


2o 


29 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


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1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


- 


6 








1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


9 


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11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


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8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


\2 


13 


5 


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8 


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10 


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19 


20 


21 


13 


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18 


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15 


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18 


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12 


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22 


23 24 


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20 


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21 


22 


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24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


29 


30 31 










27 


28 












28 


29 


30 


31 








28 


27 


28 










SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


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1 


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9 


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1i 


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9 


10 


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17 


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13 


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11 


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13 14 


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20 21 


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28 


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31 






25 


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27 


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26 


27,28 


29 


30 


31 




OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


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20 21 


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20 21 


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16 


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27,28 


29 


3C 


24 


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30 


23 


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25 


26 


27,28 


29 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


23 


29 


31 




















• • 


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30 


31 






.... 




30 














NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


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2 


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3 


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12 


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13 


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17 


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23 


24 


25 


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27 


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2-1 


22 


26 


27 


23 


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21 


22 


22 


24 


25 


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21 


22 


26 


24 


25 


26 


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23 


30 










23 


30 


31 










27 


22 


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22 


29 


30 


31 

■ • 








DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S 


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7 


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8 


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7 


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9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


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8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


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12 


13 


14 


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16 


17 


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12 


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14 


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IS 


17 


12 


11- 


12 


12 


14 


15 


■2 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


If 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2'2 


12 


22 


2" 


22 


22 


24 


25 


13 


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22 


2 s 


22 


22 


24 


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19 


22 


21 


22 


22 


24 


26 


27 


2S 


29 


30 


31 




2 C 


27 


11 


22 


32 






22 


22 


27 


22: 


2'- 


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31 


2o 


22 


27 


28 


22 


30 





Table of Contents 

Page 

College Calendar for 1921-1922 3 

Announcements for 1921-1922 7 

Faculty 9 

Administrative Organizations 26 

Conservatory of Music 29 

Michigan State Normal College, Location, Purposes, etc 31 

The Library 35 

Laboratories 38 

Societies and Clubs 43 

Scholarships 53 

The American Schoolmaster 54 

The Normal College News 55 

Normal College Extension Lectures 55 

The Normal Concert Course 56 

The Normal College Lecture Course 57 

General Items — Discipline, Teachers' Bureau, Expenses, etc 58 

Directions to Students 65 

Accepted Schools 68 

Curricula 70 

Departments and Courses 92 

Chemistry 92 

Education 96 

English 102 

Expression ; 109 

Fine Arts 114 

Geography 117 

History and the Social Sciences 120 

Home Economics 125 

Industrial Arts 133 

Kindergarten — Primary 137 



6 Table of Contents. 

Departments and Courses — Continued. Page 

Latin , . 138 

Mathematics 143 

Modern Languages 147 

Music 152 

Natural Sciences 158 

Penmanship 177 

Physical Education 177 

Physics 187 

Rural Education 193 

Special Education 195 

Training Department 200 

Names of Students 208 

List of Graduates 292 

Statistics for 1919-1920 .' 307 

Directory 309 

Index 313 



Announcements 

1921-1922 



1921 

Monday, January 3 Beginning of Winter Term 

Friday, March 25 Closing of Winter Term 

Monday, April 4 Beginning of Spring Term 

Sunday, June 19 Baccalaureate Address 

I Degree Class Day 
Sophomore Class Day 
Ivy Day 
I Registration and Reunion 
Alumni Meeting 
Class Reunions 

Tuesday Evening Reception 

Wednesday, June 22 , Commencement 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

Monday, June 27 Classification of Students 

Tuesday, June 28 Recitations Begin 

Friday, August 5 Summer Term Closes 

SUMMER VACATION, AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 

Monday, September 26 Classification of Students 

Thursday, November 24 Thanksgiving Recess 

Friday, December 16 Fall Term Closes 



8 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

1922 

Tuesday, January 3 Winter Term Begins 

Friday, March 24 Winter Term Closes 

Monday, April 3 Spring Term Begins 

Sunday, June 18 Baccalaureate Address 

[ Degree Class Day 

Monday, June 19, Class Day < Sophomore Class Day 

( Ivy Day 

[ Registration and Reunion 
Tuesday, June 20, Alumni JDay \ Alumni Meeting 

[ Class Reunions 

Tuesday Evening, June 20 Reception 

Wednesday, June 21 Commencement 

Monday, June 26 Summer Term Begins 

Friday, August 4 , Summer Term Closes 

Monday, Sept. 25 Classification of Students 

Thursday, November 23 Thanksgiving Recess 

Friday, December 15 Fall Term Closes 



Faculty 



Charles McKenny, A. M., LL.D., President. 

B. S. Michigan Agricultural College; A. B. and A. M. Olivet; 
A. M., University of Wisconsin; LL. D., Olivet. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

Florus A. Barbour, A. B., A.M. 

Professor of English; Head of Department of English. A.B. and 
A.M. (Hon.), University of Michigan. 

Benjamin L. D'Ooge, Ph.D. 

Professor of Latin; Head of Department of Latin. A.B. and A.M. 
University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Bonn; American 
School of Archaeology at Rome and Athens. 

William H. Sherzer, Ph.D. 

Professor of Natural Sciences; Head of Department of Natural 
Sciences. B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Michigan; 
Graduate Student, Universities of Michigan and Berlin. 

Charles O. Hoyt, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophij and Education; Head of Department of 
Philosophy and Education. A.B., Albion College; Ph.D., 
University of Jena. 

Elmer A. Lyman, A.B., LL.D. 

Professor of Mathematics; Head of Department of Mathematics. 
A.B., University of Michigan; two years graduate study, Uni- 
versity of Michigan; LL.D. Berea College, Berea, Kentucky. 



10 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Samuel B. Laird, A.M. 

Professor of Advanst Psychology and Logic; Head of Department 
of Psychology. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; A.B. 
and A.M., University of Michigan. 

Dimon H. Roberts, A.M. 

Superintendent of Training School. A.B. and A.M., Amherst 
College; graduate student, Clark University. 

Mark Jefferson, A.M. 

Professor of Geography; Head of Department of Geography. A.B., 
Boston University; A.B. and A.M., Harvard University. 

Richard Clyde Ford, Ph. D. 

Professor of Modern Languages; Head of Department of Modern 
Languages; Ph.B. and Ph.M., Albion College; Ph.D., University 
of Munich; graduate student, Albion College, Universities of 
Freiburg, and Munich; research student in Geneva, Paris, 
London. 

J. Stuart Lathers, A.M. 

Professor of Expression; Head of Department of Expression. 
Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; B.L. and A.M., 
I Diversity of Michigan. 

WlLBUB P. BOWEN, M.S. 

Professor of Physical Education; Head of Department of Physical 
Education, B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; B.S. and 
M.S., University of Michigan; graduate student, University of 
Michigan. 

\. II.\u\ BY, Ph.D. 

/' << < or of Pedagogy; Head of Department of Pedagogy, Grad- 
uate, Illinois Normal University; student, University of [lli- 

DO10J A.M. and Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University. 

I BBDERH I Ai.i.x kNDl R, A. B. 

Dircctoi of Conservatory oj Music, A.B., University of Michigan. 



FACULTY 11 

Carl E. Pray, A.M. 

Professor of History; Head of Department of History. B.L., 
Olivet College; A.M., University of Wisconsin; graduate student, 
Harvard University and University of Wisconsin. 

Frederick R. Gorton, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics; Head of Department of Physics; B.Pd., 
Michigan State Normal College; B.S. and A.M., University of 
Michigan; Ph. D., Berlin. 

Bert W. Peet, M. S. 

Professor of Chemistry; Head of Department of Chemistry; B. 
S., Michigan Agricultural College; M.S., University of Michigan; 
graduate student, University of Michigan and Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Martha H. French, A.B. 

Professor of Home Economics; Head of Department of Home 
Economics, Graduate, Kraus Kindergarten Seminary, New 
York City, and Oread Institute of Domestic Science and Art; 
student of Teachers College, Columbia University; A.B., 
Michigan State Normal College. Graduate student, University 
of Chicago. 

Bertha Goodison. 

Professor of Art; Head of Department of Fine Arts. Graduate, 
Michigan State Normal College; student, Detroit Art School, 
Harvard University, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
Paris, and Florence. 



PROFESSORS AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Henry C. Lott, A.M., M.Pd. 

Professor of Psychology. M.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College; A.M., Columbia University; graduate student, Uni- 
versity of Michigan and Columbia University. 



12 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

*HORACE Z. WlLBER, A.M. 

.4 ssociate Professor of Philosophy and Education. A.B., Michigan 
State Normal College; A.B. and A.M., University of Michigan; 
graduate student, University of Michigan. 

Fannie Cheever Burton, M.Pd. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. Graduate, Mich- 
igan State Normal College; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Chautauqua, Harvard, Columbia 
School of Oratory, University of Utah and Chalif School of 
Aesthetic Dancing. 

Jessie Phelps, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Physiology. B.S. and M.S., University 
of Michigan; graduate student, Universities of Michigan, 
Chicago, and Marburg. 

Abigail Pearce, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College; Ph.B. and A.M., University of Michigan. 

Mary B. Putnam, Ph.M., M.Pd. 

ociate Professor of Political Science and Economics. Graduate, 
Michigan State Normal College; Ph.B., University of Michigan; 
Ph.M., University of Chicago; M.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
( krilege; graduate student, Universities of Chicago and Michigan, 
and Harvard University. 

Frederick B. McKay, A.M. 

[ssociate Professor of Public Speaking. Graduate, Mich- 
igaD State Normal College; A.B., A.M., University of Michigan. 

\ ( iODDARD, B. S. 

1 ociaU Professor of Botany* B. S., University of Michigan; 
duat< tudent, Cold Spring Harbor Biological School, Uni- 
i m in and Michigan. 



• on I' ave. 



FACULTY 13 



Alma Blount, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English. B.S. and A.B., Wheaton Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Cornell; graduate student, Cornell, Radcliffe, 
London, and Paris. 

Bertram G. Smith, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Zoology. Graduate, Pennsylvania State 
Normal School, Edinboro; A.B., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Estelle Downing, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Univer- 
• sity of California. 

Bertha G. Buell, A.M. 

Associate Professor of History. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; B.L., University of Michigan; A.M., Rad- 
cliffe College. 

Charles M. Elliott, A.M. 

Associate Professor and Director of Special Education. B.Pd. 
and A.B., Michigan State Normal College; graduate, Ferris 
Institute; A.M., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Orlando O. Norris, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Latin. B.Pd. and A.B., Michigan State 
Normal College; graduate student, Universities of Michigan 
and Chicago. 

Bessie Leach Priddy, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History and Dean of Women. Ph.B. 
and A.B., Adrian College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan. 

Lid a Clark, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Art. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 
College and Chicago Art Institute; student, Art Academy, 
Paris; A. B., Michigan State Normal College. Student of 
DuMond, Carleson, Church, Freer. 



14 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Clyde E. Foster. 

Associate Professor of Music and Director of Public School Music. 
Graduate Holt School of Music and American Institute of 
Normal Methods, Boston, Mass.; student with Marie Hofer, 
Chicago, and Nelson Burritt, New York. 

J. Milton Hover, A.B., B.S. 

Associate Professor of Agriculture. B. Pd. and A.B., Michigan 
State Normal College; B.S., University of Chicago; graduate 
student, Cornell University. 

J axe L. Matteson, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. A.B., Michigan State 
Normal College; A.M., Cornell University; graduate student, 
University of Michigan. 

Harriet Mackenzie, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; A.B. and A.M., University of Michigan; 
graduate student, University of Chicago; graduate student, 
University of Michigan. 

John II. McCulloch, B.P.E. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.P.E. , International 
Y. M. C. A. College, Springfield, Mass. 

Ad \ A. Norton, Pii.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.B. and Ph.M., Albion 
Colli 

Alpermann, A.M. 
\ ociate Professor of Modern Languages. B.Pd. and A.B., 
Michigan Slate Normal College; A. M. Columbia University. 

M kBEL P. Bacon, A.B. 

Professor of Physical Education. Graduate, Normal 

ool of Physical Education, Battle Creek, Michigan; AB., 

Michigan State Norma] College; student, Teachers College, 

Columbia University, Earvard, and Children's Hospital, Boston. 



FACULTY 15 

Theodore W. H. Irion, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Education. B.S. in Education and A.B., 
University of Missouri; A.M., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; graduate student, University of Missouri and 
Columbia University. 

Ross A. Wells, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.B., A.B., Franklin 
College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Alice I. Boardman. 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. Graduate, Mount 
Holyoke College and Sloyd Training School, -Boston. 

Elizabeth Carey, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of English. A.B. and A.M., University of 
Minnesota; graduate student, Universities of Chicago and 
Michigan. 

Charlotte L. King, B. Pd., B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. B.Pd., Michigan 
State Normal College; B.S. Columbia University. 

Byron S. Corbin, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; student, Michigan Agricultural College; graduate 
student, University of Michigan. 

*Ida G. Hintz, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Expression. B.Pd., Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; A.B., University of Chicago. 

*Carl Lindegren. 

Assistant Professor of Music. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon, 
New York. 



* Absent on leave. 



16 normal college year book 

Walter Leary. 

Assistant Professor of Music. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon, 
New York. 

Estabrook Rankin, A.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; student, University of Chicago; A. B., Univer- 
sity of California; A.M., Columbia University. 

Elinor Strafer, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Art. Student, Cincinnati Art School, 
New York National Academy of Design; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

Ella M. Smith, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Education, and acting head of rural school 
department. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; A.B., 
University of Michigan; student, Columbia University. 

Anna M. Wolfe, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S.,' Iowa State 
College; graduate, Chicago Normal School of Physical Education. 

Mary Faulkner, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. B.Pd. and B.S., Mich- 
igan State Normal College. 

Florence Lyon, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. A.B., Indiana 
University; graduate student, Indiana University; student in 
( Jurso de Verano Para Extranjeros, Madrid, Spain. 

Jl ii. E. Richarson, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. B.S., Carleton College, 
graduate student, Carleton College, Universities of Chicago and 
Minnesota, 

HaBBT L Smith, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physics. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College; B.S., University of Michigan; graduate student, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 



FACULTY 17 



Elton Rynearson. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. Graduate, Michigan 
State Normal College. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Lota H. Garner. 

Instructor in Art. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; 
student, Olivet College, Oberlin College, Art Institute, Chicago, 
and Church School of Design, Chicago. 

Edith E. Adams, M.Pd. 

Supervisor of Woodruff Kindergarten and Instructor in Kin- 
dergarten Theory. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege and student in Lucy Wheelock's Kindergarten School, 
Boston; M.Pd. Hon., Michigan State Normal College; student 
National Kindergarten College, Chicago. 

Mary E. Hatton, B.S. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State" 
Normal College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

*Inez Rutherford. 

Instructor in Home Economics. Michigan State Normal College. 
*Clara Janet Allison, A.M. 

Instructor in Latin. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; 

A.B. University of Michigan; graduate student, University of 

California; A.M., Columbia University. 

Marion Watson, B.S. 

Supervisor of Normal Kindergarten and Instructor in Kinder- 
garten Theory. Graduate, National Kindergarten College, and 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Olive Paine, Ph.B. 

Supervisor of Kindergarten, Prospect School, and Instructor in 
Kindergarten Theory. Ph.B., University of Chicago; graduate 
student, University of Chicago. 

* Absent on leave. 
3 



is normal college year book 

Jennie Bell Morrison. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; student, Teachers' College, Columbia University 
and Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago, 111. 

Ciiloe M. Todd, B.Pd. 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College. 

Neva Greene Erwin. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College. 

Harold Rieder. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; 
Conservatory of Music, State Normal College. 

( Ihbistobel H. Sawyer, Ph.B. 

Instructor in Latin. Ph.B., University of Michigan; student, 
New York School of Philanthropy; Y. W. C. A. International 
Training School; graduate student, Columbia University and 
University of Michigan. 

( )k\ B. "Wilcox. 

Instructor in Geography. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 

College. 

[bene 0. Clark, B.Pd. 

Instructor in Physical Education. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College and Chautauqua School of Physical Education; 
graduate student, Columbia University. 

X 1. 1. L II. M. FeRBINj B.S. 

Instructor in Home Economics. B.S., Kansas State Agricultural 
College; B.S., Columbia University; graduate student, Columbia 
( Fniversity, Bethany ( lollegeof Music, and University of Chicago. 

POBTEB, A.B. 

Instructor in Honu Economics. Graduate, Winthrop College, 
the South Carolina College for Women; Cafeteria Director for 
the War Work Council of fche National Board of the Young 
Wbmen'i ( !hri I ian Associal ion. 



FACULTY 19 



Russell L. Gee. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College. 

Ellatheda Spofford. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College. 

Lera B. Curtis. 

Instructor in Physical Education. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Harvard Summer School. 

Harry M. Hill. 

Instructor in Penmanship. Graduate of Zanerian School of 
Penmanship, Columbus, Ohio. 

ASSISTANTS 

Glenadine Snow, B.S., M.D. 

Medical Examiner. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege; B.S., Kalamazoo College; M.D., University of Michigan; 
Student, American Medical Missionary College, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Carolina A. Supe, A.B., R.N. 

Assistant in Physiology.' A.B., University of Michigan; 
R.N., Battle Creek Sanitarium Hospital and Training School. 

Annett Lardie. 

Assistant in Expression. Graduate, Cumnock School of Oratory. 

Gregory McCloskey. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Martha Best. 

Assistant in Botany. 

Mary A. Long. 

Assistant in Zoology. 

Charles H. Blair. 

Assistant in Agriculture. 



20 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Acnes Dodge, B.Pd. 

Assistant in Physical Training. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College; student, Northern Illinois State Normal School and 
Chicago Normal School of Physical Education. 

Ruth Boughner. 

Assistant in Physical Training. 

FACULTY OF THE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

Dimon H. Roberts, A.M. 

Superintendent of Training School. A.B. and A.M., Amherst 
College; graduate student, University of Colorado and Clark 
University. 

Frederick M. Greenstreet, A.B. 

Principal of High School. A.B., DePauw University; S.T.B., 
Boston University; graduate student, University of Wash- 
ington. 

Margaret E. Wise, M.Pd. 

Training Teacher, First Grade. Graduate, Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State Normal College. 

Adella Jackson, M.Pd. 

Training Teacher, Second Grade. Student, University of Chicago; 
( Hark University; Emerson School of Philosophy, Boston; M.Pd. 
(Hon.), Michigan State Normal College. 

( !li di K. Footer, 

Supervisor of Music. Graduate, Holt School of Music, and 
American Institute of Normal Methods, Boston, Mass.; stu- 
denl with Marie Hofer, Chicago, and Nelson Burritt, New 
Fork. 

I'f.k! if | ( rOO Dl 

pervisot in An. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; 
!< nt of art .-it Harvard Summer School, Teachers College, 
Columbia University, Paris, and Florence. 



FACULTY 21 



Alice I. Boardman. 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. Graduate, Mount 
Holyoke College and Sloyd Training School, Boston. 

Ella M. Wilson, A.B. 

Training Teacher, Fifth Grade. Student, Cornell University; 
A.B., Michigan State Normal College. 

Edith Adams, M.Pd. 

Director of Woodruff Kindergarten and Instructor in Kinder- 
garten Theory. Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; 
student, Chicago Kindergarten College and Lucy Wheelock's 
Kindergarten School, Boston; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State 
Normal College. 

Lucia Densmore. 

Training Teacher, Second Grade, Woodruff School. Graduate, 
Michigan State Normal College; student, School of Education, 
University of Chicago, and Bay View School of Methods. 

Elizabeth McCrickett. 

Training Teacher, Third Grade. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College, and Kraus-Boeltz Kindergarten Training 
School; student, Alma College, New York University, and 
Harvard University. 

Mary E. Hatton, B.S. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Susan W. Stinson, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Eighth Grade. Graduate, State Normal 
School, Castine, Maine; B.S., Columbia University; graduate 
student, University of Chicago. 

Mabel Wombaugh, A.B. 

Training Teacher, Sixth Grade. A.B., Syracuse University; 
graduate student, Columbia University. 



22 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Irene 0. Clark, B.Pd. 

Supervisor of Physical Training. Graduate, Chautauqua 
School of Physical Education; B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College. 

I. Eleanor Meston, B.S. 

Training Teacher, First Grade, Woodruff School. Graduate, 
Saginaw City Training School.; B.S., Columbia University. 

VlNORA BEAL, A.M. 

Training Teacher of English in High School and Assistant Prin- 
cipal of High School. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; 
B.S., Columbia University; A.M., Columbia University. 

Anna Winifred Field, A.M. 

Training Teacher, Seventh Grade. Ph.B. and A.M., Grinnell 
College, Iowa. 

C. Gertrude Phelps, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. Graduate, City Training 
School, Hornell, N. Y.; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Jennie Bell Morrison. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate Michigan State Nor- 
mal College; student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 
and Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago, 111. 

Florence McLouth, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Third Grade, Woodruff School. B.S., Teachers 
College, Columbia University. 

\I< Dermott, B.S., A.M. 

Training Teacher, Open Air Room. Graduate, State Normal 
School, Geneseo, N. Y.; B.S. and A.M., Columbia University. 

M MM'.", v B.S. 

Director of Normal Kindergarten and Instructor in Kinder' 
<i<ii ha Theory. Graduate, National Kindergarten College, 
( In' Teachers College, Columbia University. 



FACULTY 23 

Neva Greene Erwin. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege. 

Florence Kelly, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade, Woodruff School. Graduate 
Milwaukee State Normal School; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

Eunice Niblick. 

Assistant in Science in High School. Graduate, Michigan 
State Normal College. 

Blanche Towne, A.B. 

Training Teacher, Special Room. A.B., University of Mich- 
igan. 

Louise Welden, B.Pd. 

Training Teacher, Rural School. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College. 

*Clara Janet Allison, A.B. 

Instructor in Latin. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; 
A.B., University of Michigan; graduate student, University 
of California, Columbia University. 

Johanna Alpermann, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages. B.Pd. and A.B., 
Michigan State Normal College; A.M., Columbia University. 

J. Milton Hover, A.B., B.S. 

Associate Professor of Agricutlure. B.Pd. and A.B., Michigan 
State Normal College; B.S., University of Chicago; graduate 
student, Cornell University. 

Jane L. Matteson, A.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. A.B., Michigan State 
Normal College; A.M., Cornell University; graduate student, 
University of Michigan. 



* Absent on leave. 



24 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Nellie Ferrin, B.S. 

Critic in Home Economics, B.S., Kansas State Agricultural 
College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Student, Bethany College, Kansas State Normal School, and 
University of Chicago. 

Mary Faulkner, B.S. 

Critic in Home Economics. B.S., Michigan State Normal 
College; graduate, Thomas Normal Training School, Detroit, 
Michigan. 

Olive Paine, Ph.B. 

Director of Kindergarten, Prospect School, and Instructor in 
Kindergarten Theory. Ph.B., University of Chicago. 

Yell B. Chamberlin, B.S. 

Instructor in English and History in High School. B.S., Colgate 
University. 

Christobbl Sawyer, Ph.B. 

Acting Instructor in Latin in Junior and Senior High Schools. 
Ph.B., University of Michigan. 

Ink/. &ELE8KY, A.B. 

Assistant in Mathematics in High School. A.B., Michigan, 
State Normal College. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

( .1 \i.\ ii. vi. M. \V \i/ro\, A.M. 

Head Librarian, A.M., St. Mary's College. 

I .\. ii. V. Andrews, A.M. 

Btferena Librarian; in Charge of Training Department Library. 
\ IV. MichiganState Normal College; Library School, University 
of Illinois. 

! .1.1/ \m.i m i . Simpson. 

( h,<i Calaloger, Library School, Armour Institute, Chicago. 



FACULTY 25 



Grace E. Haughton, A.B. 

Assistant in Order Department. A.B., University of Michigan; 
Library School, Western Reserve University. 

Ethel A. McCrickett, A.B. 

Assistant in Periodical Department. A.B., University of Mich- 
igan; Library Summer School, University of Michigan. 

Sarah M. Putnam, A.B. 

Assistant in Reference Department. A.B., University of Mich- 
igan. Library School, University of Illinois. 

Lizzie Trabilcox, A.B. 

Assistant in Circulation Department. A.B., University of 
Michigan. Library Summer School, University of Michigan. 

Mary L. Moffatt. 

Assistant in Bindery Department. Library Summer School, 
University of Michigan. 

GENERAL OFFICE STAFF 

Agnes Morse Head of the Office 

Bessie Wright Assistant Registrar 

Lyleth Turnbull Stenographer 

Ruth Leas Stenographer 

Helen M. Cook . Financial Clerk 

Gertrude Letter Stenographer 

Blanche Walters Stenographer 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Ethel E. Taylor Appointment Secretary 

Helen Smith Stenographer 



Matilda W. Robinson Visiting Nurse 



26 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATIONS 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Hon. Fred L. Jeffers President 

Hon. Allan M. Freeland Vice-President 

Hon Frank Cody 

Hon. Thomas E. Johnson Secretary- 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Charles McKenny, A.M., LL.D President 

Clemens P. Steimle, A.B Registrar 

Bessie Leach Priddy, Ph.D Dean of Women 

Dimon H. Roberts, A.M Supt. of the Training Department 

J. W. Stevens Supt. of Buildings and Grounds 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

The President is cx-officio a member of all committees. 
A i'i 'ointment— Professor Roberts, with heads of departments as 
advisory members. 
ii.lv Programs — Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Pearce, 
tciate Professor Alpermann, Professor Alexander, with a 
committee from the Student Council. 
Athletic Council Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Burton, 

Professor Peet, Registrar Steimle, Principal Greenstreet. 
Bullbtw Professor Lott, Associate Professor Matteson, Assistant 
Prof< s or ( larey, ^ 

College i i or Lyman, Registrar Steimle. 

hvbHoi ociate Professor Buell, Miss Hatton, 

Ph>f< "i l rench. 

Degree Ci bbu i Li Professor Ford, Professor Sherzer, Associate 
Profw -»,i [ilounl . 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATIONS 27 

Entrance Credits — Professor Hoyt, Registrar Steimle, Principal 

Greenstreet. 
Extra Studies for Men — Professor D'Ooge, Associate Professor 

Wells. 
Extra Studies for Women — Dean Priddy, Associate Professor 

MacKenzie. 
Honorary Degrees — Professor Jefferson, Professor Barbour, Professo 1 * 

Harvey, Miss Walton, Professor Lyman. 
Health Cottage — Mrs. Snow, Dean Priddy, Associate Professor 

Phelps, Assistant Professor Boardman. 
Lectures — Professor Lathers, Professor Ford, Associate Professor 

Putnam. 
Library — Professor Pray, Miss Walton, Associate Professor Goddard, 

Associate Professor Norton, Miss Ella Wilson. 
Morrison Cottage — Associate Professor Buell, Miss Wise, Registrar 

Steimle. 
Representatives on Aurora Board — Associate Professor Norris, 

Associate Professor Downing, Professor Goodison. 
Representative on Oratorical Board — Associate Professor McKay. 

AMERICAN SCHOOLMASTER 

Administrative Board Elected by the Faculty. 

President Charles McKenny 

Ex-Officio 

Estabrook Rankin Bessie Leach Priddy 

Mark Jefferson Dimon H. Roberts 

Editorial Board 

Theo. W. H. Irion Anna W. Field 

E. Estelle Downing F. R. Gorton 

Byron F. Corbin, Business Manager 



28 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

STUDENTS' COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President * Harold Fox 

Vice-President Inex Selesky 

Secretary Helen Ferris 

Treasurer Eunice Niblick 

MEMBERS 

Senior Class Ralph H. Carpenter (Pres.) 

Eunice Niblick 
Beatrice Carr 
Clifford D. Crane 
Inez Selesky 
Raye Roberts Piatt 

Junior Class Harold Fox (Pres.) 

Frank Lee 
Gladys St. Clair 
Katherine Stapleton 
John Reynolds 
Maradia Clark 

Sophomore Class John White (Pres.) 

Robert Benford 
John Childs 
May Graham 
Gladys Hill 
Paul Van Sickle 

I reshmen Class William Arbaugh (Pres.) 

Catherine Hutton 
Floyd Stocum 

V.M.CA Adolph Roth (Pres.) 

Merland Kopka 

V . W r . C A Helen Ferris (Pres.) 

Nola Mockler 

Men l Won Robert K. S. Speer (Pres.) 

W on* Ellen Hopkins (Pres.) 

Normal Newi Arold W. Brown (Editor) 



Conservatory of Music 



AFFILIATION WITH THE COLLEGE 

The Conservatory was organized in the year 1880 by the author- 
ity of the State Board of Education. It is affiliated with the Col- 
lege, and is under the general control of the President, and under 
the direct supervision of the Director, who is also the head of the 
Department of Music in the College. 

On account of this connection with the College, Conservatory 
students may take class work in the Normal College free of charge, 
except the regular entrance fee paid by all college students. Nor- 
mal College students may also take class work in the Conservatory 
free of charge, and receive credit in the College for their music studies. 
Conservatory students must observe all college requirements, as their 
diplomas are granted by the Board of Education. The instruction 
offered is two-fold in its purpose: first, the development of young 
musicians into artists for public service in concerts, recitals or church 
choirs; second, the preparation of teachers in the various fields of music, 
whether Instrumental, Vocal or Public School departments of instruc- 
tion. 

The Conservatory of Music publishes a special bulletin which 
may be had on application. 



FACULTY OF CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Charles McKenny, A.M., LL.D., President. 
Frederick Alexander, Director. A.B. University of Michigan. 

Piano Instructors 

Mrs. Georgia Richardson Baskerville. Pupil of Wager Swayne. 
Miss Mary Dickinson. Pupil of Leschetizky. 

Miss Grace Emery. Michigan State Normal Conservatory— Piano 
Course. 



30 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Miss Agnes Wardroper. Michigan State Normal Conservatory — 

Piano Course. 
Mr. James R. Breakey, Jr. Pupil of Mrs. Baskerville and Wager 

Swayne. 
Harold L. Rieder. 

Voice Instructors 

Mr. Walter Leary. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon. 
Mrs. Annis Dexter Gray. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon. 

Violin Instructor 

Jesse W. Crandall. Graduate, Western State Normal College, 
Kalamazoo. Pupil of Sevcik, in Prague and Vienna. 

Theory Instructors «f 

Harold L. Rieder. Michigan State Normal College Conservatory, 
Organ '15, Piano '16. Pupil of T. Tertius Noble. 

1 1 1 -sell L. Gee. 

Public School Music 

Miss Clyde E. Foster. Holt School of Music and American Insti- 
tute of Normal Methods. Student with Marie Hofer, Chi- 
cago, and Nelson Burritt, New York. 

Mrs. Neva Greene Erwin. Graduate, Conservatory of Music, 
Michigan State Normal College. 

Miss Ellatheda Spofford. Graduate, Conservatory of Music, 
Michigan State Normal College. 



Michigan State Normal College 



LOCATION 



The Normal College is located at Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County. 
Ypsilanti is on the main line of the Michigan Central Railroad, over" 
which it is readily accessible from all points on the various divisions 
of the Michigan Central system. The Ypsilanti branch of the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern gives means of approach from the south 
and west. The D. J. & C. electric line passes thru the College campus, 
giving commuication every hour with Detroit, Ann Arbor, Jackson and 
intermediate points. The 1 same electric line makes connection with 
the Ann Arbor Railroad at Ann Arbor, with the Pere Marquette 
system at Wayne, and at Detroit and Jackson with the various roads 
entering those cities. 

PURPOSE 

"The purpose of the Normal School shall be the instruction of 
persons in the art of teaching, and in all the various branches pertaining 
to the public schools of the State of Michigan." This statement taken 
from the Act of 1889 revising and compiling the school laws, clearly 
indicates the guiding principle in all that relates to the College. It is 
with this purpose in view that selection of teachers is made, that courses 
of study are arranged, that libraries and laboratories are equipt, and 
that a Training School of twelve grades and kindergarten is conducted. 
The ; law quoted above also provides that, before being admitted, all 
applicants shall sign a declaration of intention to teach in the schools of 
the state; the student's signature to the classification card is taken as 
such declaration to teach. The institution stands for three essentials 
in the preparation of the teacher: (1) a high grade of scholarship; 
(2) the study of education as a science; (3) practice in teaching under 
expert supervision and criticism. 



32 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

HISTORY 

The Michigan State Normal School was the sixth state normal 
school in the United States, and the first west of the Allegheny Moun- 
tains. The law establishing it was enacted in 1849, and its first class 
was graduated in 1854. The average enrollment down to 1860 was 
279; from 1860 to 1870, 347; from 1870 to 1880, 346; from 1880 to 
1890, 537; from 1890 to 1900, 975, and from 1900 to 1910, 2100. The 
notable increase in attendance since 1900 is due largely to increast 
attendance in summer school. This in turn is due to the practice of 
the state superintendent of public instruction of calling county in- 
stitutes in connection with the state normal schools. The enrollment 
for the year closing 1916 was 3,926. Besides this rapid increase in 
numbers, there has been, during the last few years, a remarkable in- 
crease in the number of students remaining thruout the year. Another 
notable gain has been in the better preparation of students. Since 1890 
the number of preparatory students has steadily fallen, while the 
number of graduates of approved high schools has steadily risen. There 
has been a more than proportionate growth in the number of teachers, 
the original number of five having increast to twelve in 1880, and 
now reaching a total of 103. The school for a number of years 
has been doing work of collegiate grade, and the legislature of 1897, in 
recognition of this fact, authorized the State Board of Education to 
designate the school, in the courses leading to life certificates and 
degrees, by the name of Michigan State Normal College. Under the 
action of the legislature of 1903, the State Board of Education or- 
ganized courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor 
of Arts in Education. 

GROUNDS 

The original site chosen contained a little less than six acres, situated 
on high ground overlooking the city, which lies in the Huron Valley. 
Thil wbm increasl by something over an acre in 1893, when a piece of 
ground lying to the south was purchast for the location of the Gym- 
lim. In lftOo the city of Ypsilanti purchast and presented to the 
College abort five acres adjoining on the north. A little later the 
more. An additional purchase of nine acres 
by tl gift of twenty acres from the citizens of Ypsilanti and a 

gift of i<*n acres jointly by the Athletic Council and the Alumni Associa- 
U()U f fche original campus to approximately fifty-five acres, 



BUILDINGS 33 



upon which are located the College buildings, the heating plant, and the 
athletic fields. 

ALUMNI FIELD 

The tract of about eight acres known as Alumni Field is situated 
on the north side of the street car line, a five minutes walk west of 
the gymnasium. Four acres have been graded and seeded and were 
used in the fall of 1919 and 1920 for hockey and soccer. In the winter 
of 1921 work was begun on a quarter mile cinder track surrounding 
the other four acres of the field. It is planned to move the major 
sports to this track in the near future and leave the smaller fields 
nearer the center of the campus for games and athletics among the 
general student body. 

BUILDINGS 

The original building, erected in 1852, was destroyed by fire in 
1859 and immediately rebuilt. This second building now stands as 
the central part of the main building. The front part was added 
in 1878, the west addition in 1882, the north and south wings in 1888, 
giving the building as now used the form of a cross, with a length of 
about 300 feet in each direction. The main building contains over 
sixty rooms, including class rooms, of various departments, the library, 
the offices and the high school department. 

In 1915 the College dedicated the Frederic H. Pease Auditorium. 
This is a beautiful building of the classic order of architecture. It 
has a seating capacity of two thousand, is of fire proof construction 
and has all the conveniences and appliances of the most modern con- 
cert hall. The auditorium was named for Professor Frederic H. Pease, 
who for thirty-five years was director of the conservatory and gave it an 
extended and honorable reputation. 

The Administration Building is located just south of the main 
hall on the portion of the campus formerly occupied by the conserva- 
tory of music and south wing. The structure contains the various 
offices, class rooms of three departments, and a well-lighted picture 
gallery. The building is of the same class of architecture as the Pease 
Auditorium. Its dimensions are seventy-five by one hundred seventy 
feet. 

Science Hall is a building of modern construction with spacious 
5 



34 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Class rooms and laboratories for the departments of biology, chemistry, 
physics, geology, and nature study. 

The original gymnasium, built in 1893-4, was 100 feet square and 
was located across the street south and a little west of the main building. 
In 1913 an addition 85 by 125 feet was built at the west end of the 
former gymnasium, and in the following year the basements were recon- 
structed and equipped with a modern bathing outfit. A kitchen and 
serving pantry alongside the new gymnasium provide facilities for 
preparing and serving banquets, and were Used in the summer of 1920 
to serve meals for a large number of students. 

Health Cottage is the name given to the College hospital. The 
building is in charge of a trained nurse and is free to students unless 
a protracted sickness requires the attendance of a special nurse. The 
hospital has seven beds and has proved adequate to the college 
demands. 

The Training School building furnishes accommodations for a kin- 
dergarten department, the eight grades of the elementary school and 
an open air room for children who are of delicate physical constitution. 
It contains an assembly hall which seats between four and five hundred, 
a gymnasium ; a library and rooms for the department of Home Econo- 
mic. 

The Home Economics department is located in specially equipt 
rooms in the west wing of the Training School building. The rooms 
include a modern kitchen laboratory and two sewing rooms, together 
with a suite for serving and an up-to-date laundry. They are light 
and attractive and offer opportunity for thoro training in Home Ec- 
onomics. The Ellen Richards House is the name given to the cottage 
m uliicli groups of Home Economics students live for part of their 
i year, thereby gaining real experience in practical housekeeping. 

Each grade room in the Training School building is furnisht with 
two recitation rooms, which make possible training facilities for the 
number of teachers who must, pass thru this department. 

ther Hallj the gift of Mrs. Mary Starkweather, is a sub- 

bial ai '1 beautiful stone building, used freely as a social center by 

the <ollo^p. The building contains the offices of the 

I'D- and Young Women's Christian Associations, a large, 

sunny Living room with •■) table- of current magazines, a rest room, a 

kitchen, and arj assembly hall, 



THE LIBRARY 35 



LIBRARY 



The library numbers 49,200 volumes. It is open from 7 a. m. to 
9 p. m. from Monday to Saturday in term time, and from 8-12 a. m. 
on all vacation days. 

In the Reading Room three thousand books are on open shelves, 
free of access, and also the current numbers of periodicals and news- 
papers, of which about 230 are currently received. The books comprise: 

(1) General dictionaries, cyclopedias, commentaries, atlases, 
miscellaneous books of quotations, literary helps and compendia, 
year-books, almanacs, etc., etc. 

(2) Bound files of general magazines, with Poole's index, the 
Readers' guide, and other general indexes. 

In the Stack rooms the iron stacks of the Library Bureau are used. 
The Dewey classification is followed, and access is restricted to students 
who assist in the library. 

STUDENTS ASSISTANTS 

Students desiring to work in the Library apply to the librarian; 
a regular hour daily, is assigned, and promptness and regularity are 
demanded. No credits are given for this work, but free access to the 
shelves at all times and the knowledge acquired of books and of library 
work are considered a good equivalent. 

The librarian meets students desiring this work one hour a week 
on Thursday at 1 o'clock for practical instruction in the use of books 
and libraries, and reference work as teachers. Besides the service at 
the delivery desk, special work is assigned each student. 

This course is a prerequisite for all student assistants. 

DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES 

The department libraries of from 100 to 1000 volumes each, are 
growing slowly but steadily. These constitute an effective addition 
to the equipment of the class rccm for ready and special reference. 
Several of the departments have special card catalogs of subjects 
relating to their particular work. These give more complete and 
detailed reference than would be possible in a general catalog of the 
library, and greatly facilitate the research work of the student. 



36 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT LIBRARY 

The connection between the Library and the Training Department 
is very close. From the General Library many volumes are drawn 
every hour for supplementary reading, for the preparation of lessons 
and for illustrative helps in teaching. For over twenty-five years 
each grade has had a class room library. Eight years ago a Training 
Department Library was opened, in charge of a regular assistant. It 
contains 3,000 volumes, on open shelves, and also a collection of 4,000 
pictures. Primarily a reference library for the students who are 
teaching it is also a laboratory for classes in literature for the grades; 
and circulating library for the children of the Training department. 

HOW TO USE THE LIBRARY 

1 . The library will be open — 

Mondays to Saturdays, inclusive, 7:00 a. m. to 9:00 p. m. 
Vacation days (excepting legal holidays), 8:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 

2. All students are entitled to the full use of the Library at all times, 

subject to the following regulations: 

a. Silence shall be strictly observed. 

b. Students shall use in the Library only the books and periodi- 
cals there provided. 

c. Xo book, periodical, or work of reference shall be taken from 
the Library until charged at the Loan desk. 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 

.; A charging slip of the regulation form must be left, signed by 
the person drawing the book, periodical or work of reference, 
and giving the author, title, and accession number as indicated 
on the slip. This slip will be supplied at the Loan desk. 

a. All books may be drawn for class room use. 

b. Works of reference and periodicals may be taken for work on 
the campus only and must be returned at the close of the class 
hour. 

t Boolfifl for home study may be reserved from 7:00 a. m. to 5:00 
p. m. and taken firm the Library between 3:00 and 6:00 p. m. 
Reserved books must be charged on slips, and returned before 
00 a. in. the nexi day {Saturday morning included) unless the 
Librarian < xtenck the time. 



THE LIBRARY 37 



d. No books for home use will be issued after 6:00 p. m. 

e. All books are subject to recall. 

/. All books shall be returned to the Library at the close of each 

term. 
g. Any book lost or damaged must be replaced. 

THE CARD CATALOG 

4. The catalog is a list of all books in this library. It is on cards 

arranged as follows: 
1st — The Author catalog is a list in alphabetic order of the names 

of the authors of the books, with their titles. 
2nd — The Title and Subject catalog is a list in alphabetic order of 

the titles of the books and the subjects of which they treat. 

In calling for books at the Delivery desk, give author, title, and 

call number. The call number is in the upper left corner of 

each card. 

INDEXES TO PERIODICALS 

Poole's Index; Readers' Guide; Annual Magazine Subject Index; 
Dramatic Index. 

These indexes, and a List of bound periodicals in this Library, will 
be found in the R. L., case 24. For Official list see Card catalog. 

Look in indexes for subject wanted, and consult the List of bound 
periodicals in the College Library. In indexes, Atlan. 10:464-8 means 
Atlantic vol. 10, pages 464 to 468. 

For key to abbreviations of periodicals, see first page of indexes. 

Periodicals markt R.L. (Reference Library) are in the Reading 
Room, free of access, arranged in alphabetic order by title, beginning 
in Case 1. For all others, ask at Delivery desk, giving title, volume, 
and call number of periodical. 

BOOK LISTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES 

Reference lists must be verified in the Card catalogue and in the 
List of bound periodicals. 



38 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



LABORATORIES 



BIOLOGICAL 



Science Hall affords facilities for biological study. Several rooms 
are devoted to botany, physiology and zoology, two of which are large, 
finely lighted laboratories. The laboratories and lecture rooms contain 
fairly complete collections for illustrative purposes and for systematic 
study, supplemented with charts and models. The department 
possesses a full equipment of compound dissecting microscopes, mic- 
rotomes, tanks and aquaria, and the apparatus and instruments 
required for modern biological work. A fairly complete bird collection 
is available for study containing representatives of most of the local 
forms. The herbarium contains some four thousand mounted plants 
from various sections of the United States and Canada. 

A vivarium-room contains live forms used in the various work 
of the department. The zoological colleotion has been enriched by 
B valuable skull series, the donation of the late Dr. John M. Watling, 
of \Yashington, D. C. The collection represents the work of many 
j ears' study of the dentition of the vertebrates. 

AGRICULTURAL 

A new agricultural laboratory has just been completed at the 
wesi end of the greenhouse. This laboratory contains tables and 
facilities for work in soils, farm crops and plant propagation. By 
opening directly into the greenhouse, it is thus very conveniently 
located for all practical purposes. The greenhouses also contain much 
representative agricultural material for illustrating various methods 
of plan! propagation, plant culture, etc. 

The science gardens are divided into flower, vegetable and crop 

•n • wrhere may be found growing thruout the summer a wide 

• of agricultural plants for illustrating the work not only in agri- 

culture bul is nature study and botany as well. The Normal College 

iderable farm land which will be utilized for work in 

farm a 

There is being accumulated in room V in Science; Hall a large number 
of charts, pictures, Lantern slides, demonstration material and demon- 



LABORATORIES 39 

stration apparatus necessary for the successful teaching of the agri- 
cultural courses. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL 

In addition to the zoological collection, which is used in the study 
of comparative anatomy, the college possesses a life-size manikin of 
French manufacture, articulated and unarticulated skeletons, numerous 
models, special preparations, apparatus, charts, photographs and 
lantern slides. A complete series of microscopic mounts is being made. 
The State Board of Health liberally supplies the department with its 
pamphlets relating to the nature, spread and restriction of contagious 
diseases. 

GEOLOGICAL 

By means of purchases and donations the department has brought 
together good working collections of minerals, rocks and fossils. Fairly 
complete illustrative collections are arranged in a special room in 
Science Hall, adjoining the laboratory and lecture room. The labora- 
tory is equipt with all needed instruments, apparatus and supplies for 
practical work upon minerals and rocks. Maps, charts, models, a 
stereopticon with numerous slides, and a growing collection of photo- 
graphs, are used to enrich the class work in geology. A full photo- 
graphic outfit and dark room are available for those desiring to make 
use of them. The moraines of the Huron-Erie ice lobe and the series 
of beaches of the ancient glacial lakes are within easy reach by electric 
car. The drift of the region furnishes an abundance of common rocks 
and minerals for individual collecting. 

PHYSICAL 

In Science Hall Thirteen rooms are devoted to the instruction in 
physics. Of these, five are located on the first floor and include a 
lecture room, apparatus and preparation room, laboratory for advanst 
experimental work, dark-room for photometry, and a large dynamo 
room which is also the laboratory for advanst physical measurements. 

On the second floor are seven rooms, including the large lecture room, 
laboratory for physics 1, 2 and 3, two dark-rooms for photometry and 
photography, two apparatus rooms, the office-library, and shop. 

Both lecture rooms are furnisht with direct and alternating electric 



40 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

currents, means for darkening the windows, and lantern facilities. 
Various motor-generators and a storage battery system installed on 
first floor supply the lecture tables and laboratories with the necessary 
direct current for all experimental purposes. 

The apparatus collection of the department contains not only the 
pieces required for the demonstration and experimental work per- 
taining to high school, college and household physics, but special 
equipment has from time to time been procured to illustrate wireless 
telegraphy, x-rays work, electrical resonance, radio-activity, high 
potential effects; diffraction, polariscopic and spectroscopic work; 
lantern projection, photography, theoretical and industrial photo- 
metry, gas calorimetry, etc. A two-step amplifying wireless telegraph 
set for receiving time signs from Washington is a part of the equipment. 
Local wireless telephone waves are also received on this apparatus. 

CHEMICAL 

Seven rooms are appropriated to chemistry: A store and dispensing 
room, a lecture room, a preparation room, a laboratory for elementary 
chemistry, a laboratory for advanst chemistry, a combustion room, and 
a combined balance room and library, all supplied with the usual 
equipment for four years of chemical work. 

The lecture room is provided with conveniences for lanterning, 
for handling gases on a large scale, and for demonstrating the impor- 
tant laws of chemistry. 

The balance room contains 14 sets of balances and weights, 9 of 
which are good analytical balances. There is an excellent chemical 
library in this room, much used by students. 

The laboratory for advanst chemistry contains a good supply 
of apparatus for gravimetric and volumetric work; a number of drying 
ovens; a Victor Meyer and a Bechman apparatus for the determination 
Of molecular weights; and general apparatus for work in physical and 
organic chemistry, including an equipment for fuel testing, and appara- 
tus for qualitative analysis and food analysis. 

The laboratory for the work of the first year is especially large, 
c omm o di ous, and well supplied with fittings and apparatus for working 
out or verifying the principles of the science. 



LABORATORIES 41 



ASTRONOMICAL 

The astronomical laboratory consists of an open-air observatory 
upon the roof of Science Hall; an eighteen-foot Warner and Swasey 
dome for the Alvan Clark and Sons' equatorial; a transit room for the 
Brandis transit, the Negus chronometer and the small chronograph; and 
a draughting and store room for astronomical photographs, trans- 
parencies, charts, etc. 

FINE ARTS 

The department of Fine Arts occupies the second floor of the Ad- 
ministration Building. The class rooms are fine in design, and well 
equipped and lighted. These rooms include a small library, with many 
periodicals and books on art, a lecture room with all conveniences for 
showing lantern slides, and also an art gallery. During the year, art 
exhibitions of various kinds are shown in this gallery and at the end 
of the year, students' work is exhibited here. 

GEOGRAPHICAL 

The department has a large collection of books, maps, pictures 
and models with which to illustrate its teachings. An outfit of meteoro- 
logical instruments, including barograph and thermograph, makes it 
possible to get a very real acquaintance with our weather and its 
sequences. Recently projecting apparatus has been installed in the 
main lecture room for class instruction and the department collection 
of slides is growing rapidly. The slides have been prepared from the 
best book illustrations in our excellent library and from Professor 
Jefferson's photographs from his personal travels within the state and 
elsewhere. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The gymnasium and fields serve as laboratories for this department. 
The equipment includes three large exercise halls, two swimming 
pools, a rest room, two rooms used for corrective and remedial exer- 
cises, two examining rooms, a combined library and office, and two 
class rooms. The fields include separate grounds for football, and 
baseball well graded and kept, a fifth mile track and fifteen tennis 



42 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

courts. The pools are kept in good sanitary condition by filtering and 
such use of disinfectants as is necessary. 

The men have two locker rooms and 200 steel lockers; the women's 
locker room is divided to form 120 small dressing rooms with 8 lockers 
in each. Hot and cold water is provided for 110 shower baths. 

The three exercise halls are equipt with all forms of German and 
Swedish apparatus and with the material for all the minor games and 
athletics. Mats are provided for tumbling. Four games of basket 
ball, volley ball or indoor base ball can be played at once, making it 
possible to carry on extensive tournaments. One gymnasium has an 
indoor running track. Each of the three has a piano. The three 
gymnasia open together, making an excellent place for social gatherings. 
The class rooms are equipt with a good outfit for teaching anatomy and 
physiology of exercise. 

DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES 

The Natural Science Department has accumulated the nucleus 
of a teachers' library of texts, guides, helps and supplementary readers. 
This now includes important works relating to zoology, physiology, 
botany, and geology. Pupils and visiting teachers who desire to make 
a comparative study of texts, or to learn what is available in these 
subjects, are cordially invited to make use of this library. The general 
library is supplied with the important books of reference, periodicals, 
m a n ua l s and advanst texts, relating to the natural sciences. 

The nature study library used at Chautauqua by Miss Anna A. 
Schryver for a number of years has been turned over to the Depart- 
ment, with its reference catalog. Most of the publishers have 
donated their Nature Study and Elementary Science books of more 
recenl date, bo that there is now available for examination by those 
interested a very complete set of such literature relating to the grades. 

The Agricultural department is building up a Avorking library of 

and reference books on agriculture, and also accumulating the 

.1 bulletins covering the various phases of this subject. This 

collection i- to be found in room V of Science Hall and is freely accessible 

to alL 

About two hundred authoritative, modern texts dealing with all 

education, and of mental hygiene, have been collected 

during the Is I f< u yean by the teachers and the students of the phy- 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 43 



siology classes. A few of the books have been contributed; most have 
been purchased from funds raised by small fees imposed on those 
classes in which no text had to be purchast. Thus an easily available, 
working loan library is on open shelves for the use of all students of 
the special physiology classes. Room K. Science Hall. 

The Physical department has a working library on each floor con- 
sisting of nearly 300 important works of reference in physics and 
astronomy, and excellent sets of portraits of eminent scientists. 

A special card catalog with some eight thousand references enables 
students to use these books and portraits effectively. The department 
also possesses a large collection of physical and astronomical lantern 
slides. 

The physical education department has a library containing between 
400 and 500 volumes and a card catalog quite fully workt out for the 
principal topics in physical education and hygiene. Eight or ten of 
the magazines of most interest to students of this department are on 
file here as well as in the general library. 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 



THE ALUMNI 



Since the Normal was opened in 1852 there have gone from it 
about 15,570 graduates, the great majority of whom have taught in 
the schools of our own and neighboring states. Individually, these 
alumni of the institution exert a considerable influence in determin- 
ing the educational policy of the state with which the interest of the 
Normal College are inseparably connected. Until recently there 
has been very little movement towards organization, but within the 
last few years a markt increase in this direction has been noticeable. 
There have also been of late more and larger alumni reunions, and a 
considerable number of local organizations have been formed. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This association has been in existence for many years. There 
is a growing feeling that the alumni should perfect an organization 
that Avould be better centralized, making it possible at all times for 
individual members of the association to obtain information concerning 



44 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

their classmates and others. In this way concerted action could 
be had touching matters that would advance the interests of the Normal 
College within the State, and also in the larger field outside where 
many of its graduates locate. The Normal College News stands 
ready to lend whatever assistance it can to any such project. 

For the present the work of the association is along the following 
lines : 1 . The holding of College reunions wherever feasible, at teachers' 
institutes, State Association meetings, at the College at Commence- 
ment time, and at the annual Michigan Conference. Special emphasis 
is placed on the reunions held in connection with the meeting of the 
State Teachers' Association. Decennial reunions of former classes 
are held at Commencement time in addition to the general meeting. 
Classes of 1871, '81, '91, 1901, '10, will hold reunions in June, 1921. 
2. The organization of county alumni clubs, whose purpose it shall be 
to foster in every way possible the interests of the College. The 
nuclei for these clubs are now being formed in College by the organiza- 
tion of county clubs among the students now in school. 3. The dis- 
# semination of items of interest about the College and its graduates 
thru the columns of the Normal College News, and American School- 
master, keeping alive interest in the College and the Association. 

The officers of the Association for the year 1920-1921 are: President, 
Mrs. T. J. Knapp, '96, Highland Park, resigned; Vice-President, 
Henry A. Tape, '12, Milan; Secretary-Treasurer, C. P. Steimle, '02, 
Ypsilanti; Executive Committee, Norman Arthur, '08, Detroit, three 
years; Frederick B. McKay, '04, Ypsilanti, two years; Mrs. Dessalie 
Ryan Dudley, '11, Battle Creek, one year; Necrologist, Arthur C. 
Erickson, '03, Ypsilanti. 

The Association is an active force for good and deserves every 
encouragement. Correspondence giving information about former 
students or members of the faculty is desired and should be addrest 
to the Registrar of the College. 

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 

'1 he affairs <»l the oratorical association arc conducted by the Ora- 

torical Board composed of fourteen representative students and a 

faculty member, who supervise the oratorical, debating, and many 

of the dramatic activities of the college. The art of public speaking 

long been cultivated a1 the Normal College and oratory and debate 

bitute a major student activity. Thru programs, club work, and 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 45 



inter-society contests, large numbers of students become proficient 
on the platform, many of whom are given opportunity to participate 
in the numerous inter college activities. The college usually parti- 
cipates in two oratorical contests and four debates each year, and has 
a record of having won twenty-six of the forty debates in which it 
has taken part since 1900. In 1919-20 occurred the annual dual debate 
with Hillsdale College, which resulted in two victories for the Normal 
College. 

The Annual Oratorical contest (the 1921 contest being the 32nd) 
held early in January is open to both men and women. They con- 
test separately and the winners represent the college in intercollegiate 
oratory. Gold medals for excellence in oratory are awarded in both 
contests. This year money prizes of $25.00 for first place were also 
awarded in each contest. The College is a member of the Michigan 
Oratorical League, the other institutions being Adrian, Albion, Alma, 
Hillsdale, Hope, Kalamazoo, and Olivet. Its aim is to foster an in- 
terest in college public speaking thru its annual contest held on the 
first Friday of March. Gold medals are awarded to the honor contes- 
tants. 

There are four flourishing debating clubs on the campus. The 
Lincoln and Webster clubs offer opportunities for platform training 
among the men, and the Wodeso and Willard clubs among the women. 
A keen inter-club rivalry expresses itself in enthusiastic contests. 
Their work is done under the constant supervision of faculty critics. 
From these clubs the college intercollegiate debating teams are chosen. 
The members of the teams representing the college are awarded gold 
medals. 

The association also puts on Shakespearean plays, smaller per- 
formances, an annual Interpretative Reading contest, and an annual 
Freshman Public Speaking contest, in the last two of which $40.00 
in money prizes are offered. 



NORMAL CHOIR 

The Normal Choir is a chorus of two hundred mixt voices singing 
under the direction of Professor Alexander. Rehearsals are held two 
evenings a week, in Pease Auditorium as follows : 

Tuesdays 6:15-7:15 Sopranos and Contraltos. 
7:15-8:15 Tenors and Basses. 



46 NORMA!, COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Thursdays 7-8 Full Choir. 

The repertory for the year is selected with reference to the public 
appearances of the Choir at two of the concerts in the Normal Concert 
Course and at certain functions of Commencement week. A varied 
literature of musical masterpieces is therefore studied thru the year 
consisting of alia cappella carols and old church pieces for the Christmas 
concert; modern part-songs and an oratorio for the spring concert. 

Membership. — Conservatory students are required to become 
members of the Choir, the experience of ensemble singing being con- 
sidered invaluable in developing a finely balanced musicianship. Stu- 
dents of the College are eligible to membership. Choir members must 
prove their ability to memorize choral works, individual tests being 
made after the second week in rehearsal. College students, who are 
not Conservatory students, are allowed one credit for faithful atten- 
dance at all rehearsals and services scheduled for the season. 

During the year 1919-1920 the following programs were presented: 

March 10, 1919. 

Little Masterpieces of Ecclesiastical Music from the early 
seventeenth thru the nineteenth centuries 
Choruses sung unaccompanied 
I. A Seventeenth Century Folksong, 1617 

Arranged by Carl Hirsch 
Jesus in the Garden 
II. Two Russian Liturgical Compositions 

a. Credo Gretchyaninov 

Cantor: Carl Lindegren and Choir 

b. Bless the Lord, () my Soul Ippolilov-Ivanov 
III. Two Modern Hymns to the Virgin Mary 

:i. French: La Vierge & la Creche Cesar Franck 

}>. [talian: Ave, Maria Riccardo Zandonai 

Bung by fl small choir in unison, with piano ac- 
companiment, and with full choir responses 
[V. The Ballad of the Three Kings Peter Cornelius 

Solo William A. Kerr 
with chorus alia cappella 
Old m i k fob the Clavichord 
l Prelude ld C J.S.Bach 1722 

Monique Francois Couperin 1665-1733 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS . 47 



?,. Gavotte Jean Phillippe Rameau 1748 

From Fete " Temple de la Gloire" 
4. Ave Marie Arkadelt 1550 

Played by Frederick Alexander 
(The clavichord is a modern reproduction, by Arnold 
Dolmetsch, of the instrument used by Bach.) 
V. Cantata : 

Sainte Marie Magdeleine Vincent D'Indy 

Soloist— Mrs. Gray 
This Cantata and No. Ill, a, were sung in French; 
No. Ill b, in Italian. 
VI. Finale to "Gallia" Charles Gounod 

Jerusalem! O turn thee to the Lord thy God! 

For this program the choir was gowned in medieval Tabard Robes 
of rich reds, with appropriate head dress, designed and furnished by 
the costume department of the Society of Arts and Crafts, Detroit. The 
program was produced three times in Detroit from the stage of the 
Little Theatre at the Society of Arts and Crafts, 25 Watson Street, 
Friday and Saturday evenings and at a Saturday matinee, March 7-8, 
1919. 

Fifty members of the choir gave the program at Ann Arbor, March 
19, 1919, at the invitation of the Matinee Musicale, singing from the 
stage of the Ann Arbor High School. 

From the Detroit Evening News, March 8, 1919. Written by 
Cyril Arthur Player — formerly on the editorial staff of the London 
Times: 

"The choir of women from Michigan State Normal School at 
Ypsilanti came with a fine reputation to uphold, vindicated tradition, 
and almost set a new model in concert programs. 

Scattered over the country there are a few, a very few, organiza- 
tions of women who do attempt seriously to present a program which 
shall be artistically complete in setting as well as in performance. 
Among these few the Ypsilanti choir ranks high; Friday night at the 
Arts and Crafts Theatre, known also as the Little Theatre, this ex- 
cellent organization lifted a pleased audience into a dim, historic past, 
let queer monotones fall on their ears and did remarkable and satis- 
fying things with the half-light of music. 

There was a dim, religious glow to the program, as well as a cathedral 



48 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 

calm. As for the technical part of the performance, it needs hardly 
to be said that the choir lived well up to its reputation and a little 
beyond; precise in attack, clear in delivery and enunciation, well 
poised, careful in phrasing, with well developed dramatic taste and a 
sense of values, a buoyant sustained quality and exquisite refinement 
of expression, these may be placed to the credit of Frederick Alex- 
ander's choir." 

December 11, 1919 

Christmas Music 

1. Adoramus te Palestrina 

2. Only Begotten Son Gretchyaninov 

3. Credo Gretchyaninov 

Cantor: Carl Lindegren and Choir 

4. Cherubim Song Gretchyaninov 

5. The Legend of the Sage Bush Massenet 

Baritone solo from "Le Jongleur de Notre-Dame" 
Mr. William A. Kerr 

6. Ave Maris Stella Edward Grieg 

7. A Legend Tchaikovsky 

8. God is With Us Katalsky 

9. O Gladsome Light Sir Arthur Sullivan 

10. The Coventry Carol Traditional English 

11. Chanson joyeuse de Noel Old French 

This program was given twice on Sunday, December 14, in the 
North Woodward Avenue Congregational Church, Detroit, to 
capacity houses, and in Ann Arbor, Tuesday evening, December 16, 
under the patronage of the ladies of the Matinee Musicale. The 
Ann Arbor production was given in St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Tin? young women of the college have three literary societies, 
the Portia, the Minerva, and the Laonian, each of which has a mem- 
benhip of about twenty-five, including one or more women of the 
(acuity, who act, as general advisers and literary critics. The aim 
of the organisations is to develop and train the literary and social 
interests of the members. 

To this end, the work, which varies somewhat from year to year, 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 49 



consists in general of studies in art, literature, and travel. The Laonian 
Society, which specializes in a study of the modern drama, is a sub- 
branch of the National Drama League of American. In addition to 
the regular semi-monthly meetings devoted to story-telling, readings, 
reports, papers, talks, and lectures in the field prescribed for any given 
year, there are occasional social meetings of various kinds, which do 
much to strengthen the bonds of good fellowship among the members 
of the societies. 

THE CONTEMPORARY CLUB 

This is an organization among the women of the faculty which 
has for its object the cultivation of good fellowship among its mem- 
bers, the discussion of educational and other matters of common 
interest, and the promotion of more intimate and helpful relations 
between the women of the faculty and the women students. The Con- 
temporary Club is affiliated with the Michigan State Federation of 
Teachers' Clubs. 

NATURAL SCIENCE CLUB 

The Natural Science Club was organized early in 1920, with Pro- 
fessor Sherzer as Patron. All stndents specializing in the Natural 
Sciences or making Natural Science their major or minor work are 
eligible to membership. The number of members is gratifyingly 
large. The meetings consist of reports by students and faculty 
members, and discussions covering a wide range of current and 
popular biology. The program for the year includes field trips for 
observational and collecting purposes. 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

It is the purpose of this organization to promote scientific study 
by reviewing the chemical literature of the day. Some attention is 
given to the chemical industries and recent discoveries in science. 
The club holds its meetings once a month in the chemical lecture 
room. 

Near the end of the college year the' members visit some chem- 
ical industries in Detroit or Toledo. The following are some of the 
plants visited: Parke, Davis & Company, Morgan and Wright Rub- 



50 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

ber Company, Acme White Lead and Color Works, Berry Brothert 
Varnish Company, Detroit Creamery Company, National Biscuis 
Company, Semet Solvay Company (by-product coke ovens), Libbey 
Glass Company, Owens Bottle Machine Company, Ford Plate Glass 
( Company, and Sun Oil Company. 

ART CLUB 

The Normal Art Club is an organization to which all students 
; .iv eligible, who, at the close of the winter term, have made averages 
of C in academic subjects, and of B in specializing subjects. 

THE GARDEN PROJECT CLUB 

The Garden Project Club is composed of interested students and 
teachers of the Agricultural and Botanical departments. The primary 
purposes of the club are to create interest in the practical and aesthetic 
features of plant life, and to dispose in a practical way of the materials 
which are produced in the regular routine work of the two departments. 
Thru the efforts of the club a valuable and much needed collection of 
- has been added to the equipment of the Natural Science depart- 
ment. 

HISTORY CLUB 

I he history club is managed and organized by the students speci- 
alizing in history. The Head of the Department is Patron of the 
club. The meetings are held bi-weekly, some important field of history 
being chosen for the year's work. Regular programs are given by 
m< mben of the club. This year's program has been devoted to the 
Btudy of immigration. Frequent social meetings are held with the 
object of fostering a feeling of friendship and solidarity among those 
illy interested ill the study of history and allied subjects. 

• 

THE EUCLIDEAN SOCIETY 

Th( Euclidean Society was organized January 13, 1916. The 

purpose of tin society is to broaden the knowledge of its members 

along ;!, pedagogical, and practical lines of Mathematics. 

" held on the first and third Thursday evenings 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 51 



)f each month. All members of the faculty from the Department 
>f Mathematics are honorary members of this organization. 

SODALITA3 LATINA 

A Latin Club, known as The Sodalitas Latina, was organized 
during the winter of 1915-16 by the students of the Latin Department. 
It has a twofold object: first, the cultivation of acquaintance and 
g;ood fellowship among the students specializing in Latin; second, 
the stimulation of interest in classical studies. There is both a senior 
and junior branch and the meetings are semi-monthly, the two branches 
meeting together once a month. The programs consist of songs, readings, 
reports, informal talks, and presentation of Latin plays. Occasionally 
the meetings are of a purely social character. 

MEN'S UNION 

The men of the institution have organized themselves into a society 
known as the Men's Union. The object of the union is to further 
the fraternal and social life of the men, and to stimulate co-operative 
interest in matters of student welfare. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The religious activities of the college center in three student or- 
ganizations, the Young Men's and the Young Women's Christian 
Associations and the Catholic Students' Club, each carrying on a 
social and religious program. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The student Y. M. C. A. has proved itself of great value to the 
religious and social life of the young men of the college. It is equip t 
with a large room on first floor of the Administration Building. Its 
meetings are well attended and lively discussions usually follow. It 
furnishes opportunity to hear some of the best speakers. 

Its method of finance is unique and is being followed by a number of 
schools thruout the country. Aside from its regular meetings are 
opportunities for Bible and Mission Study classes. It is represented 
by a number of its men at the Annual Student Y. M. C. A. Confer- 
ence held at Lake Geneva. Wisconsin. 



52 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The women of the college support a vigorous and efficient Y. W. C. A 
occupying Starkweather Hall which is centrally located among the 
buildings of the campus and is the gift of Mrs. Mary Starkweather. It* 
homelike rooms afford pleasant places for reading, rest, or study foi 
all women of the college. 

The Association employs a general secretary who gives her entire 
time to the social and religious welfare of the young women. It alsc 
carries on all lines of activities customary to such an organization. Ir 
addition to regular weekly meetings it maintains classes in Religious 
Education and for training students for social service in rural communi- 
ties. Its frequent and varied social events offei\ fine opportunities 
to young women for social recreation. The Association assists ir 
finding employment for students who desire to earn a part or all o; 
their college expenses and it provides committees to meet new students 
at the trains and interurban cars giving any needed aid or information. 

THE CATHOLIC STUDENTS' CLUB* 

In the years past the Catholic students attending the Michigan 
State Normal College and Cleary Business College have attempted 
to meet in a social way. About five years ago a permanent organiza- 
tion was established, and today it is a nourishing Club with a mem- 
bership of one hundred seventy-five. 

The meetings are informal gatherings held twice a month in the 
Catholic Club House. Besides the social functions and business 
meetings, the members are privileged to enjoy short talks on vital 
and interesting subjects by men and women of standing who have a 
message worth whole. 

The Club is governed by a simple constitution and is maintained 
by moderate dues. The organization was established to promote so- 
cial intercourse; social betterment, and a deeper appreciation of respon- 
sibilities and possiblities. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 53 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



For several years the Stoic Society has awarded small scholar- 
ships to students of unusual ability who were doing third year work. 
The usual custom of the Society is to offer a scholarship of $50.00 
which is available for the student's use about the middle of the third 
year. 

E. A. STRONG SCHOLARSHIP 

The E. A. Strong Scholarship of fifty dollars is awarded annually 
to some student of exceptional ability who is doing third-year work. 
This is derived from the proceeds of an endowment fund establisht by 
the Stoic Society in 1913 and named in honor of Professor Strong. 

MORRISON ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP 

The Normal College Alumni Association offers six scholarships to 
women needing aid in order to pursue their education. This was made 
possible thru a bequest of the late Mrs. Effiah J. E. Morrison, who 
left to the college her property, a seven-room house and certain residuary- 
funds. This property is administered by the Alumni Association. 
The immediate direction of affairs and the awarding of the scholarships 
are in charge of a committee of the faculty under the Dean of Women. 

Morrison Cottage affords an opportunity for six women students 
to live on the co-operative plan under the direct supervision of a matron 
appointed by the college authorities. The house, comfortable and 
attractive, is furnisht rent free, a small weekly sum being charged for 
coal; all other living expenses are pro-rated among the residents. The 
scholarships are good for one year and a summer term, and are con- 
sidered equivalent at present to a saving of about $150.00 each on 
living expenses at the college. Further information concerning them 
may be had from the Dean of Women. 

"Persons desiring to be regarded as applicants should send with 
their requests, references as to their scholarship, their character, their 
financial need, and their probable fitness for teaching. The college 
is glad to consider recommendations to these scholarships from school 
superintendents, principals and county commissioners of schools. 



54 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB LOAN FUND 

A fund cf $100 contributed and administered by "the Contemporary 
Club if new available fcr rise in annual awards to deserving Freshmen 
girls. 



THE AMERICAN SCHOOLMASTER 



The American Schoolmaster is a monthly magazine publisht under 
the auspices of the Normal College and devoted to the interests of 
general education. It is concerned primarily with matters pertaining 
to the professional aspects of teaching, including school organization, 
school management, and questions of method. These are considered 
from the standpoint of the teachers' college, emphasis being placed 
upon the principles involved rather than upon particular ways of 
reaching certain desired ends. While the publication was designed 
primarily to reflect the views of the Normal College, its scope has been 
widened until now it represents the best thought on present day topics 
as exprest by leading educators in all parts of the country. All articles 
are selected with respect to their value to teachers, and thru the publi- 
cation the College seeks to extend its influence beyond the classroom 
and to prove of service to the teacher in active work. 

The immediate control of The Schoolmaster is vested in an executive 
committee cf the College Faculty, consisting of the President of the 
College M;d Four additional members. At the present time this com- 
mittee consists of President McKcnny, Professor Jefferson, Professor 
Rankin, Professor Priddy and Professor Roberts. The editorial 
board consists of members of the faculty selected by the executive 
committee. 

The Schoolmi ster is not merely a local publication. It serves, 
in <"i large measure, as an organ of expression for the normal schools 
and departments of education thruout the countiy. Its purpose is 
in bring within the reach of teachers and students of education the 
l;:i< i ideas pertaining to (ho profession of teaching, and to give to 
Qcerncd with the i dministration of schools and the training of 
t ea< hers opjx rtunity for an elaboral ion and exchange of ideas. 

The Bcho( Imi ter i no1 maintained \'<>v financial gain. The sub 






EXTENSION LECTURES 55 



scrip tion price is one dollar a year; all money received in excess of 
actual expenses is used in increasing the value of the publication. 



THE NORMAL COLLEGE NEWS 



The Normal Coolege News is a weekly educational newspaper 
publisht under the auspices of the Normal College. Altho designed 
as an institution paper, the News contains much matter of a general 
educational interest. In addition to giving a full account of the College 
life and of the activities of the different school organizations, the various 
departments have opportunity thru the News to represent the character 
of the work being done and to give a wider circulation to the ideas 
which they emphasize. Lectures are reported thru the News and 
important announcements made; also by means of this publication the 
various College interests are unified and the alumni and the schools of 
the state are kept in close touch with the Normal College. 

The News is under the control of the College faculty, the direct 
management being vested in a committee of the faculty with a managing 
editor selected from the student body. 

The subscription price of the News is one dollar fifty cents per year. 
Students and others desiring to keep in touch with the interests of the 
school cannot well afford to be without the publication. 



NORMAL COLLEGE EXTENSION LECTURES 



The State Normal College has prepared and will send on request a 
special bulletin concerning courses of extension lectures. The work done 
in other years will be much increast and will be adapted in every way 
to meet the needs of educational work in city, village and rural com- 
munities. 

Persons wishing extension lectures before their formal announce- 
ment by bulletin should write the president and arrangements will be 
made. It should be borne in mind that the most convenient dates are, 
of course, Friday evenings and Saturdays. Members of the faculty 
are prepared to give also commencement addresses and to do institute 
work for which regular charges are made. 



56 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



NORMAL CONCERT COURSE 



Frederick Alexander, Director 

A series of concerts running thrucut the college year brings to 
Ypsilanti many of the mcst distinguished artists and musical organi- 
zations of the world. Since the year 1609 the list includes: 
Orchestras: Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, Conductor 
(3 seasons). 
Russian Symphony (2 seasons), Modest Altschuler, Conductor. 
New York Symphony (2 seasons), Walter Damrosch, Conductor. 
Minneapolis Symphony, Emil Oberhoffer, Conductor. 
Detroit^ Symphony (2 seasons), Westcn Gales, Conductor. 
The Barrere Ensemble (2 seasons). Wood-wind instruments 

from the New York Symphony. 
The Longy Club (2 seasons). Wood-wind instruments from 

the Boston Symphony. 
The Kneisel Quartet. 
Societe des Instruments Anciens: Maurice Hewitt, Quinton, 
Henri Cassadesus, Viole d' Amour; Eugene Dubruille, Viole de 
Gambe; Maurice Devilliers, Basse de Viole; Clavecin, Madame 
Regina Patorni. 
Trio: Witek-Malkin Trio. 

Singers: Anna Case, Florence Hinkle, Corinne, Rider-Kelsey, Janet 
Spencer, Gertrude Rcnnyson, Eleanor Hazzard Peocock, Annis 
Dexter Gray, Carl Lindegren, Louis Graveure. 
Pianists: Harold Bauer, Percy Grainger, Eleanor Spencer, Georgia 
Richardson, Baskerville, Clara Mannes, Mary Dickinson, John 
Powell, Vera Richardson. 
Violinists: Maude Powell, David Mannes, Anton Witck, Sascha 

Jacobinoff. 
Violincellists: Elsa Rucgger, Jceef Malkin, Willem WiUeke; 
Miscellaneous: Mme. Liza Lehmann and Vocal Quartet from Eng- 
land, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Dolmetsch, Harpsichord and Clav- 
ichord Recital, The Fuller Sisters from England in Old English 
Ballads and Folksongs, The Orpheus Club of Detroit. 
During the year 1917-1918 the following concerts were given: 



normal concert course 57 

October 17 

Sascha Jacobinoff Russian Violinist 

Vera Richardson American Pianist 

November 5 

2. Louis Graveure Belgian Baritone in a Song Recital 
December 7 

3. Societe des Instruments Anciens 
Maurice Hewitt. Quinton; Henri Cassadesus, Viole d' Amour; 
Eugene Dubruille, Viole de Garnbe; Maurice Devilliers, 
Basse de Viole; Clavecin, Madame Regina Patorni. 

December 13 

4. Christmas Music Alia Cappella 
Normal College Choir, 200 Singers 

January 9 

5. Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, 94 players 

Leopold Stokowski, Conductor 

Course tickets, reserved seats, are sold at the advance sale at $4.00. 
Second sale, one seat to each student enrolled in the Normal College, 
$3.00. Single concerts are $2.00. 

NORMAL COLLEGE LECTURE COURSE 

The Normal College Lecture Course offers to the students an 
opportunity to hear some of the leading thinkers and speakers of the 
country. During the last few years there have appeared in this course 
such noted men as ex-President Taft, Newell Dwight Hillis, Dr. Steiner, 
Beatrice Forbes Robertson Hale and Champ Clark. 

The course for the present year consisted of the following numbers: 
Judge Marcus Kavanaugh, Gerrit A. Beneker, Professor Percy Holmes 
Boynton, Emiline Pankhurst, Maud Wood Park and an amateur 
production of a comedy put on under the direction of the school. 

Tickets for the entire course have been sold during the past year 
for 50 cents to students and one dollar to others. 



58 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



GENERAL ITEMS 



STUDENT WELFARE 

The college authorities appreciate the solicitude which parents 
feel when they send their sons and daughters away from home to 
school and they also appreciate the great responsibility which a college 
assumes in the care and training of the young men and women who 
come to it. No subject is given more serious consideration by the j 
faculty of the Normal College than the physical and moral welfare 
of its students. 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

The welfare of the women students is lookt after by the Dean 
of Women who takes a direct interest in all matters pertaining to 
their school life. 

THE HEALTH OF STUDENTS 

The health service of the college is in general charge of a faculty 
committee of seven, of which the Medical Examiner is chairman and 
the I Van of Women and the College Nurse are also members. 

All students are given a physical examination each year, including 
measurement of height, weight and breathing capacity, examination 
« i <•!.. at, nose, throat and posture and a test of vision. Appointments 
I he examination are given out on registration day; the examinations 
are given in room of the south gymnasium. The examining phy- 
i t! '•( c hcurs during the whole year at the same room to con- 
-ult with \\< n:< n .indents on matters of personal health. 

' e in i< ii:' dial gymnastics are provided for those needing suchj 
work; a rest hour is prescribed for eases needing that rather than 
These classes give credit to satisfy the requirement of 
the college for physical training; entrance to them is by personal arrange- 
following the physical examination. 
8tud< rted ill are visited by the college; nurse or by some 

ed to thai duty; students suffering from minor ailments 
I nil the examiner or the nurse for advice or treat- 
ment. In Cfl e <»f illness students may be taken to health cottage. 






GENERAL ITEMS b\) 

where (he college nurse can give them better care than they could 
receive at their rooms. There is no charge for use of the hospital 
nor for the services of the nurse; a charge is made for meals, and if 
the case is such that a special nurse is required, the student bears the 
expense. 

By special arrangement with the University authorities, students 
of the Normal College are allowed the same privileges at the U. of 
M. hospital at Ann Arbor as the university students. Under this 
arrangement many of our students, securing dates from the college 
nurse, go to Ann Arbor for special examination or treatment. 

The latest addition to the equipment of our own health cottage is 
one for testing the eye, so that now students can have the services of 
an oculist here. 

HOUSING REGULATIONS 

The college prepares a list of approved rooming houses each year. 
The dean of women will be glad to advise women students either by 
letter or in person in regard to rooms. Since a term is the shortest 
period for which rooms are rented, it is advisable that students inspect 
rooms before renting, if possible. It is advisable that rooms be engaged 
in advance, but there is always a possibility of obtaining accomodations 
on registration day. On classification days in the fall, day trains will 
be met by college girls ready to assist incoming students. 

Women students do not room in houses where there are men lodgers, 
either single or married, without permission from the dean of women . 

Women students are expected to take care of their own rooms, and 
all students provide their own towels. Many matrons require students 
to be responsible for all the linen in their rooms and some ask students 
to furnish either one extra pair of blankets or one comfortable. 

Students may not move during the term without permission from 
the college authorities. 

If a student wishes to move at the end of the term, notice to that 
effect must be given the matron fourteen days before the day on which 
the term ends. Half rent is paid during the Christmas and spring 
vacation to the matron in whose house the student has been rooming. 
This does not hold for students who are leaving college. 



60 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



SOCIAL REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to observe the customs of good society. 
Attention is called to a few establisht customs. 

Gentlemen callers are received only in the first floor parlor provided 
in all approved rooming houses. 

Women students are not expected to entertain gentlemen callers 
more than once a week and such calls are limited to the week end. 
The calling hour ends at ten. 

Students may attend only those social affairs approved by the 
college. Women may attend college affairs during the w T eek with 
gentlemen escorts, but other engagements with men should be confined 
to the week end. 

Unless women students are attending events approved by the 
college, they are to be in their homes by ten o'clock. 

Women students who are to be out of town for the week end, over 
night or later than six p. m. must register in advance with the dean of 
women. 

Students are advised not to go canoeing unless they can swim. 
Women students who go to the river or on automobile rides are advised 
not to remain after dark unless accompanied by persons approved by 
the college authorities. 

DISCIPLINE 

The State Normal College is supported by the taxpayers of Michigan, 
and is responsible to the state for the character and scholarship of 
those it sends out to teach in the public schools. The administrative 
authorities have, therefore, adopted the policy of asking such students 
Bfl are found not adapted to school work to withdraw from the institu- 
tion. Students who fail to pass in a large part of their work, or whose 
character and habits are such as to unfit them in any sense for the 
important work of teaching, cannot expect to complete the course and 
receive the ..met ion of the authorities of the institution. Every 
effort will be made to encourage, direct and assist all worthy students, 
bill those who do not show promise of good results or are otherwise 
unfit to go Into public schools as teachers, will be askt to withdraw. 



GENERAL ITEMS 61 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

The college faculty believes that the system of government is 
best that is the outcome of the experience and deliberation of all whom 
the government affects. Acting on that theory it has establisht a 
Student Council composed of members elected from the respective 
memberships of the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., and the three college 
classes. This council meets with the president of the college for the 
purpose of discussion of questions affecting student welfare. 

LOAN FUND 

The State Legislature in 1899 passed an act providing "that five 
or more persons of full age, residing in the State of Michigan, may 
associate and incorporate themselves together for the purpose of 
establishing loan funds for the benefit of schools, scholars, and students 
of the state, to assist them to attend the State Normal College at 
Ypsilanti, the Central Michigan Normal School at Mt. Pleasant, and 
other State institutions. " 

A corporation organized in accordance with the provisions of this 
Act "Shall be under the general agreement of not less than five nor 
more than fifteen trustees," and "shall in law and equity be capable 
of taking and receiving real and personal estate not exceeding twenty- 
five thousand dollars in the aggregate, for the purpose of its incorpora- 
tion. " (Public Acts of 1899. Act No. 250, pages 389-391.) 

A society has been organized under these laws and a beginning 
has been made toward the administration of such a trust. Funds 
to the amount of over $500.00 have already been acquired, and it is 
believed that, now that a beginning has been made, large additions 
will be made to this loan fund. 

THE TEACHERS' BUREAU 

The Teachers' Bureau consists of a committee of the faculty, 
which seeks to place each graduate of the institution in the position 
best adapted to his qualifications. These qualifications are determined 
by a careful examination of the student's complete record as shown 
by his work done not only in the Training School, but also in the various 
departments of the College. The bureau seeks in this way to do full 



62 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

justice to every student and is able to give exact and discriminating 
information to school officials seeking teachers. The work of the 
bureau has been extended to include all graduates of the College teaching 
in the state, with the view of giving them all possible assistance in 
advancing their professional interests. Full and confidential informa- 
tion will be sent school officials concerning candidates. It is our 
policy not to send out general letters of recommendation for indiscrim- 
inate use, but to recommend a candidate for the particular position 
that he is qualified to fill. A large number of the members of every 
graduating class have had considerable experience in teaching besides 
that obtained in the Training Department. There are among our 
students and graduates persons admirably fitted for the various high 
school principalships and superintendencies as well as for depart- 
mental work in our high schools. In addition, each graduating class 
turns out well prepared teachers of physical education, home economics, 
music and art, kindergarten, county normal training teachers, and 
a large number who are especially prepared for various elementary 
grades. , School authorities are invited to visit Ypsilanti, see the 
students at work, and make selections of teachers after a personal in- 
terview. All letters of inquiry will receive careful attention. 

STANDARD OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES 

Students who fail in two out of four subjects regularly carried in 
any one term are automatically dropt from the institution and may 
not re-enter except on permission of the proper authorities. Unless 
markt improvement be shown during the following term, they will be 
requested to withdraw from college. 

The following grades are used by the College, each unit of credit 
being valued in points as follows: A, four points; B, three points; 
C, two points, I), one point; E, no points; F, failed; Inc., incomplete. 
A student may be markt "incomplete" if some portion of his work 
remains unfmisht, providing his standing in the course has been of 
grade \) or higher. r \ <> secure credit, an incomplete, must be completed 
within one month after the beginning of the following term; otherwise, 
th< course will be recorded a,- of grade F. A failure in a subject can 
be removed only }><• re-taking t]ie subject in class. The final term. 
reports are made out m accordance with these grades and regularly. 
isi ued from the "f!i" t" the parent or guardian of the student. 



GENERAL ITEMS 63 

All advanst credit from other institutions is regarded as of grade 
3, when evaluating for points in the Normal College. To secure 
he life certificate the student must secure twenty-four units of credit 
nd at least tw r enty-four points; limited certificate, fourteen credits 
nd at least fourteen points; for theA.B. and B.S. degrees forty-eight 
iredits and at least forty-eight points. 

This system of grades went into effect at the beginning of the fall 
erm 1916. Each unit of credit earned prior to that date is given 
>oints in accordance with the corresponding mark of the old system. 

SCHOOL FEES 

For residents of Michigan, $5 for each regular term of twelve weeks 
nd $3 for the summer term of six weeks. 

For non-residents of Michigan, $10 for each regular term of twelve 
^eeks and $5 for the summer term of six weeks. 

Students on the Rural School course are not required to pay the 
bove named fees. 

Students withdrawing in the first week of the term may receive 
efund of entire fee paid; from first to fourth inclusive one-half of fee; 
'hereafter no refund. Summer Term: No refund after the first 
l/eek. * 

Requests for refund should be given immediate attention as the 
ate of notification to the General Office is considered the date of 
ithdrawal. 

Under no circumstances will any refund be made except upon sur- 
ender of Receipt. 

Students in the Conservatory of Music who carry subjects in the 
formal courses, pay the same entrance fee as do others. Conserva- 
jory students who take private lessons only, pay each term an entrance 
be of one dollar and a half ($1.50). 

Every student is required to pay a general fee of $2.50 for each 
iegular term and $2.00 for each summer term. 

At the Girls' Gymnasium a deposit of 25 cents is required for the 
se of a locker key, upon return of which the money is refunded. • 



64 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Laboratory Fees 

Chemistry SI. 00 

Home Economics: 
Household Arts: 

Cooking 2.00 

Sewing 2.00 

Home Economics 18 1 .00 

Home Economics 20 2.00 

Industrial Arts 15, 16, 17, each 1 .00 

Kindergarten 75 

Natural Science 50 

Education 2 25 

Diploma Fees 

Degrees $3.00 

Life Certificate # . 3.00 

Conservatory 3 . 00 

Graded Certificate 2.00 

Rural Certificate 2.0C 

High School . 1.00 

ROOM AND BOARD 

The college provides no dormitories. Abundant and conven- 
ient rooms may be had at reasonable rates in the homes of the citizens 
of Ypsilanti. A few rooms may be rented with privilege of light house- 
keeping. No cooking or eating of meals is allowed except in rooms 
equipt for that purpose. Board may be had in numerous clubs situated 
within easy reach of the College and rooming places. 

Rooms furaisht for two may be rented for $2.00 to $3.00 each 
pf-r week. Students rooming alone pay double rent or nearly SO. 
Board Id clubs may be had for $6.00 per week. Four cafeterias serve 

• 

There are opportunities for students to earn part of their expenses 

rking ID boarding clubs or private families. Those desiring 

Hicb employ menl should make application early to the Dean of Women. 

tdvisable, however, for students to come with funds sufficient 

for • m nf the first term. 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 65 

Where economy is practist, necessary expenses, including room, 
meals, school fees and laundry may be estimated as follows : 

ESTIMATED TOTAL EXPENSES PER TERM OF 12 WEEKS 

Board, twelve weeks $60.00 to $72.00 

Room 24.00 to 36.00 

Laundry 5.00 to 10.00 

Books and stationery 5 . 00 to 10 . 00 

Registration and other fees 9 . 00 to 11 . 00 

Total $103.00 to $139.00 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 



The following regulations apply to all students, are im- 
portant and should be attended to promptly: 

Classification for the Fall and Summer terms occurs in 
the Men's Gymnasium; for the Winter and Spring terms 
according to announcement given out at the close of the pre- 
ceding term. 

Students on the specializing curriculum are classified 
under the direction of the heads of the departments in which 
the specializing is done. 

All students specializing in music should apply at the 
Conservatory for classification. 

Students wishing to take the Kindergarten-Primary cur- 
riculum should be classified by Professor Roberts. 

Students on the General curriculum preparatory to 
teaching in the grades should be classified by Professor Hoyt 
or Lott. 

Students wishing to take the Intermediate curriculum 
should be classified by Professor Lott. 

Students preparing to take out a Graded School Certifi- 
cate should be classified by Professor Harvey. 

Students preparing to take out a Rural School Certificate 
should be classified by Miss Smith. 
9 



66 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Students completing the High School Curriculum should 
be classified by Principal Greenstreet. 

Beginning work in any foreign language is not credited 
until a year's work is completed. 

When entering, give your name as you want it to appear 
on your diploma when you graduate. 

Present your credentials (high school or other stand- 
ings) when you pay your entrance fee. A copy must be on 
file in the General Office. If you failed to bring your cre- 
dentials with you, send for them and present them at the 
earliest possible moment after your entrance. Blanks for 
entrance standing may be secured from the superintendent 
of any accepted high school or by writing the Registrar 
before coming. 

All students must be registered and fee paid before en- 
tering clag 

Order of classification: Fill out all parts of classifica- 
tion card and secure signature of classifier. Pay entrance 
fee. Enroll in your classes promptly according to schedule. 
it instructors will sign your classification card. 
irn card to the General Office immediately after obtain- 

ttures of instructors. 
Leave no classes permanently and make no change in 
cepting temporary changes the first few days) 
put written permission from the President, Registrar, 
o I ' )< an of Women. 

ular work for a term for a student is four academic 

and, in addition, usually one and sometimes two 

of the following non-credil subjects: Physical training, 

dp and - . Regular work for a summer 

<< pi that only two academic 

tead of four. Students who 

mount must secure permission 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 67 

of the Extra Studies Committee. Petitions for an extra 
subject should be made in writing. Blanks for this purpose 
may be had in the General Office. 

No further credit will be given for any subject taken in 
a high school and repeated here. 

Students bringing credits beyond the requirements for 
entrance will receive no advanst credit for the first year of 
a foreign language unless it be followed here by a second 
year of the same language. 

Leave your Ypsilanti address at the Post Office. 

ADVANST CREDITS 

Under certain conditions credit for work done elsewhere will be 
allowed on curricula here. 

Graduates from County Normal Training Classes who are also 
graduates from approved high schools are given credit in eight subjects. 
This enables such students to obtain a Life Certificate on completion 
of sixteen units which may be done in four regular terms, or a year and 
two summer terms. In doing regular work it is always advisable for 
County Normal students to begin with a summer term, stay thru the 
following year, and complete the course in the succeeding summer 
term. 

County Normal graduates who have graduated • from approved 
high schools are given credit in six subjects in the graded school certi- 
ficate curriculum. 

Graduates from the Ferris Institute Normal Course may obtain 
a Life Certificate on completion of twelve units of work. The subject 
matter is determined after a conference between the student and the 
Chairman of the Life Certificate Committee. Graduates from the 
Ferris Institute College Preparatory Course are permitted to enter as 
high school graduates. 

Candidates bringing credits from other institutions to be credited 
on the life certificate curricula should present them to the Entrance 
Credit Committee (Prof. CO. Hoyt, Chairman). 

The Committee on Advanst Credits for Degrees (Prof. R. C. Ford, 
chairman) may at its discretion allow credits from the following schools : 



OS NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

(1) the University of Michigan; (2) the Agricultural College; (3) all 
other regularly incorporated Michigan colleges; (4) institutions of 
like rank in other states. 

All such credits when acted upon by the proper committee should be 
presented to the Registrar for filing in the General Office. 

NOTES 

The Normal College desires to help those who need to prepare 
for second and third grade certificates. Classes in the necessary 
subjects are in progress every term. 

Persons wishing to take up special studies are subject to the same 
conditions of admission as other students. 

Many students for various reasons are not able to complete one 
of the regular courses without interruption. To these no credits 
once earned are lost, and there is no objection to their continuing 
and completing the course at any subsequent time. 



ACCEPTED SCHOOLS 



Recognizing the importance of permanent connection between 
the secondary schools of the state and the Normal College, the Board 
of Education has adopted a plan whereby formal recognition is given 
to the work done by the public school system of Michigan. The 
following quotation from the records of the Board explains itself. 

Michigan State Normal College recognizes that there is a 

public BChool -system, in Michigan. It proposes, therefore, to give 

due credit for all work done in the public high schools of the com- 

inized with the prevailing standard for such 

ate. The following extract from a resolution past 

by th< i'i of Education, quite fully expresses this policy. 

all pupil graduated from twelve-year public-school 

owing not Less than thirty-six weeks per year, in which four 

full devoted to high Bchool work, with not less than two 

chew wholly employed in distinctively high school 

gular two years' life certificate college 

it bout exam - 



ACCEPTED SCHOOLS 69 



AGREEMENT AS TO TRANSFER OF CREDITS BETWEEN THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AND THE MICHIGAN STATE 

NORMAL COLLEGE 

1. Graduates of the Normal College in any of the advanced cur- 
ricula leading to life certificates shall be given fifty-six hours' credit 
at the University of Michigan, provided: 

(a) That the work of said curricula shall extend at least two 

years in advance of the approved high school. 

(b) That said graduates shall have met the entrance require- 

ments of the University. 

(c) That at least one year of the work presented by such grad- 

uates shall have been done at the Normal College. 

(d) That credits from other institutions accepted by the Nor- 

mal College toward graduation shall be subject to eval- 
uation by the University. 

2. Graduates of the Normal College in a life certificate curric- 
ulum, who have done more than two years of work, may transfer 
their credits to the University of Michigan on an hour for hour basis, 
it being definitely determined by mutual agreement what Normal 
curricula, are to receive University credit, provided, (a) that not 
more than ninety hours of credit may be given for three years of work at 
the Normal College, and (b) that, if credit for extension work be 
included beyond the first two years of work, such credit shall be sub- 
ject to an evaluation by the University. 

3. Graduates of the Normal College taking the degree of A.B. 
will be admitted to the Graduate School of the University provided: 

(a) That they show satisfactory high school preparation. 

(b) That they have completed a satisfactory four year colle- 

giate curriculum, consisting of forty-eight units of work. 

(c) That they bring with them personal recommendations of 

their fitness for graduate study. (See page 72.) 



Curricula 



The Normal College is called upon to furnish teachers for all grades 
and departments found in the public schools of the state from the 
kindergarten to the high school and for that reason it offers a large 
number of distinct curricula. For economic reasons some students 
cannot well remain more than a year in school before earning money 
and to meet the necessities of this group two curricula one year in 
length leading to limited certificates are offered. 

THE COLLEGE YEAR 

The college year is divided into three terms of twelve weeks each 
and a summer term of six weeks. The regular terms begin near the 
first Monday in October, January and April respectively, the summer 
term about July first (see Announcement). Students may enter 
at the opening of any term. 

The unit of work and of credit is a course of instruction in one 
subject involving not less than four recitations per week for a term 
of twelve weeks. This counts as twelve weeks of work or "a unit." 
A student doing regular work carries four subjects and completes 
four units in a term or twelve units in three terms. Two units of 
credit can be earned during the summer term. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who are college graduates, or graduates of accepted 
high schools (see Accepted Schools), will be admitted to the college 
courses without examination upon presenting evidence of such 
graduation. They should in every case present a record of the studies 
they have pursued, with standings. Blanks for this purpose will be 
upon application to the Registrar. 

Students who have completed a part of the course of an accepted 
high school will he admitted to the Normal College High School on 
nting credits of work already done 

Students wrho hold first grade county certificates endorsed by 



CURRICULA 71 



the State Superintendent of Public Instruction will be admitted on 
the same basis as graduates from accepted high schools. 

Holders of state certificates will be given one year's (12 units) 
credit on the life certificate. 

DEGREES 

The college grants the A.B., B.S., and M.Pd. degrees. 

The college believes that any person completing a four-year course 
of coordinated subjects designed to fit one to teach in any department 
of the public schools is entitled to a degree indicating that he has made 
such preparation. 

The A.B. degree is given to candidates completing the four years' 
curriculum described on page 72. 

The B.S. degree is granted to candidates who complete four year 
curricula which are more specialized and technical in character than 
the A.B. curriculum. 

The M.Pd. degree is honorary. 

CURRICULA 

Curricula requiring four years for completion and leading to the 
degree of A.B. or B.S. and a life certificate: 

General Curriculum leading to the degree of A.B. 

General Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 

Home Economics Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 

Physical Education Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 
Curricula requiring two years for completion and leading to a life 
certificate : 

High School and Departmental 

Grammar Grade 

Intermediate Grade 

Kindergarten-Primary 

Commercial 

Drawing 

Music 

Music and Drawing 

Physical Education 

Rural School 

Special Education 



72 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Curricula requiring one year and a summer school for completion 
and leading to a certificate valid for three years: 
Graded School 
Rural School 

DESCRIPTION OF CURRICULA 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULA 

Bachelor of Arts Curriculum 

Advisor — Professor Ford and the head of the department in which 
the major work is taken. The bachelor of arts curriculum leads to 
the degree A.B. The forty-eight units which constitute the course 
must be taken in accordance with the following requirements. 

(1) Four units in Education (1, 2, 3, and 4), four units in Teachers' 

Courses, and two units in Teaching. 

(2) Two units in Composition and Rhetoric, one of which must 

be taken in the Freshman year. 

(3) In addition to the above, five units from each of the following 

three groups: 
Group I: Ancient Language, Modern Language, English Lan- 
guage and Literature. 
Group II: Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, 

Geology, Zoology, Botany and Geography. 
Group III: History, Political Science, Philosophy, and Edu- 
cation. 
The remaining twenty-one units offer opportunity for freedom 
of election and for specialization in one or more subjects. Courses 
must be chosen upon the principle of major and minor subjects and 
can be elected only on the approval of the Advisory Committee upon 
the A. P>. Course. With the consent of this committee two units 
may be taken in Music and two in Drawing. At least two-thirds of 
the work taken In residence beyond the Sophomore year, must be in 
courses aol open to first year .students, and no candidate will be rec- 
ommended for the A. B. degree who has spent less than one year of 
residence at the Norma] College and who has earned while in resi- 
dence less than twelve units of credit. The senior year or its equivalent 
must be spent in residence at the Norma] College. (For agreement on 
above curriculum see page 69.) 



CURRICULA 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

This curriculum leads to the degree of B. S. It offers opportunity 
to those who wish to take a full college course in preparation for teaching 
in the elementary grades, or special subjects, such as commercial 
branches, music, drawing and manual arts. 

Requirements: 

(1) Four units in Education, (1, 2, 3, 4), four units in Teachers' 

Courses, and two units in Teaching. 

(2) Two units in Composition and Rhetoric, one of which must 

be taken in the Freshman year. 

(3) In addition to the above, three units from each of the following 

groups : 
Group I : Ancient Language, Modern Language, English Language 
and Literature. 
Group II: Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, 
Geology, Zoology, Botany and Geography. 
Group III: History, Political Science, Philosophy and Edu- 
cation. 
The remaining twenty-seven units are elective and give ample 
opportunity for specialization in specific lines. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



It is desirable that students enter the department at the beginning 
of the fall term. 

General requirements for admission are the same as for other college 
courses. One year of high school chemistry, with laboratory practice, 
is required of all students entering the department. Those not pre- 
senting this will be required to make it up as a deficiency.. Two years 
of modern language are required in this curriculum. Two years of 
high school credit in modern language may exempt the student from 
taking the second year here, and give her the opportunity to elect 
other academic work of equal credit. 

Upon successfully completing this curriculum the student will 
receive the Bachelor of Science, together with the Life Certificate. 



74 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Fall Term 
Home Economics 1 
English 
Zoology 
Fine Arts 10 



First Year 
Winter Term 

Home Economics 2 

English 

Botany 11 

Fine Arts 12 



Physical Tr., Elective Physical Tr., W 1 



Home Economics 4 
Chemistry 7 
Modern Language 
Education 1 



Second Year 

Home Economics 5 
Chemistry 11 
Modern Language 
Education 2 



Spring Term 
Home Economics 3 
English 
Physical Ed. 5 
Chemistry 3 
Physical Tr., W 2 



Home Economics 6 
Home Economics 10 
Modern Language 
Education 3 



Home Economics 18 
Fine Arts 11 
Modern Language 
Education 4 



Third Year 

Home Economics 8 
Physics 17 
Modern Language 



Home Economics 9 
Home Economics 12 
Modern Language 



Home Economics 19 Mathematics 



' Economics 11 
or 17 

I Science 5 
Borne Economics 15 
Ilmiif Economics 7 



Fourth Year 

Home Economics 11 

or 17 
Social Science 1 
Home Economics 20 
Home Economics 30 



Home Economics 11 

or 17 
Social Science 2 
Home Economics 21 
Home Economics 14 



NOTE. ! v o terms of teaching and one of Home Economics 11 
stice House) are required of all students in the department. These 
should !"• bo planned that no student carries Home Economics 11 
while she is teaching. 

During the fourth year Home Economics 11, 17, and 30 arc rc- 
quired sul I be others offered may J>o elected by the students, 

or the requirements may be met by taking subjects in departments 
other than I tome Economii 

Home Economics L6, Cafeteria Management, will be offered each^ 
t< 1 1 - udentsin the department as an elective. 

Penman hip i required of .-ill i ( udente in the colli 



CURRICULA 



75 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



LEADS TO DEGREE OF B. S. 



Life Certificate can be secured at the end of two years by a re- 
arrangement of courses. 



Fall Term 
Education 1 
Physical Ed. 3 
Botany 11 
*Language 

Men 
Gymnastics 
Field Athletics 
Women 
Physical Tr. 16 
Physical Tr. 12 



First Year 
Winter Term 
Education 2 
Physical Ed. 13 
Zoology 
*Language 

Men 
Gymnastics 
Indoor Athletics 
Women 
Physical Tr. 1 
Physical Tr. 14 



Spring Term 
Education 3 
Physical Ed. 15 
English 1 
^Language 

Men 
Physical Training 10 
Physical Tr. 9 
Women 
Physical Tr. 11 
Physical Tr. 18, 15 



Physical Ed. 1 
Physics 

Physical Ed. 12 
*Language 

Men 
Physical Tr. 8 

Women 
Aesthetic Dancing 
Soccer, Apparatus 



Second Year 

Physical Ed. 2 
English 11 
"("Teachers' Course 
*Language 

Men 
Physical Tr. 6 

Women 
Physical Tr. 1 
Physical Tr. 12 
Athletics 



Physical Ed. 9 
Chemistry 3 
fTeachers' Course 
^Language 

Men 
Physical Tr. 9 

Women 
Physical Tr. 11 
Physical Tr. 12, 15 



Education 4 
Hygiene 1 
Chemistry 7 
Physical EcL 19 



Third Year 

fTeachers' Course 
Hygiene 2 
Physiology 
{Elective 



fTeachers' Course 
Hygiene 3 
Physical Ed. 6 
{Elective 



76 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Men 

Physical Tr. 8 or 5 
Coaching, Officiating 

Women 
Dancing, Military 
Coaching, Officiating 



Physical Ed. 7 
Teaching in T. S 
JElective 

Men 
Gymnastics, Athletics 
Teaching, Coaching 

Women 
Physical Tr. 14 
Teaching, Coaching 



Men 
Physical Tr. 6 
Coaching, Officiating 

Women 
Apparatus Work 
Coaching, Officiating 

Fourth Year 

PhyscialEd.4 
Physical Ed. 10 
{Elective 
Free Elective 
Men 
Gymnastics, Athletics 
Teaching, Coaching 

Women 
Physical Tr. 12 
Teaching, Coaching 



Men 
Physical Tr. 9, 5 
Coaching, Officiating 

Women 
Dancing, Military 
Coaching, Officiating 



Phsycial Ed. 21 
Physical Ed. 15 
{Elective 
Free Elective 
Men 
Gymnastics, Athletics 
Teaching, Coaching 

Women 
Physical Tr. 18 
Teaching, Coaching 



*Five units in either ancient language, modern language, or English. 
tFive units in either history, social science or education. 
{The Teachers' Courses listed in this curriculum are to be chosen 
by the student from the following list: 

English 8 Expression 1 History 31 Mythology 

English 9 Geography 1 Mathematics 11 Nature Study 

Students who plan to pursue this curriculum should take in high 
school : 

Two years of foreign language, 
( )nc year each of physics and chemistry, 
All the practice in games and gymnastics the school affords. 
Ability to play the piano is a very useful accomplishment in this 
Line of teaching. 



CURRICULA 



77 



*TWO YEAR CURRICULA 



HIGH SCHOOL AND DEPARTMENTAL 

The advisor is the head of the department in which the major 
elective is taken. 

This curriculum takes the place of the specializing curriculum which 
is discontinued. It is designed for those who are preparing: 

1. To become principals and superintendents in the smaller 
high schools. 

2. To teach in junior or senior high schools. 

3. To teach in schools having the departmental system. 

REQUIREMENTS 



Required Courses 








Education 1, 2, 3, 


4 


4 units 




English 1, 3 




2 units 




Teaching 




2 units 




*Hygiene 1 




1 unit 


9 units 


Elective Courses 






15 units 
24 units 



Of the fifteen electives not more than nine may be taken in any 
one department. 



ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Penmanship — All candidates for graduation must obtain a credit 

in handwriting. 
Physical Training — Four terms of physical training are required. 

Men take Physical Training m 2, 1, 5, and 9. Women take an 

elective followed by w 1, 2, and 3. 



*A11 credits earned on any of the two years curricula will count 
in full toward the A. B. or B.S. degree, depending upon the character 
of the curriculum pursued. 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



GRAMMAR GRADE CURRICULUM 

Advisors — Professor Hoyt and Professor Irion. 

This Curriculum is practically the same as the old General 
Curriculum. 

As the name implies, this curriculum is designed for those who 
expect to teach in the seventh and eighth grades. The courses are 
largely specified because the curriculum of the seventh and eighth 
grades is definite in character. 



REQUIREMENTS 



Education 1, 2, 3 4 




4 units 




Fine Arts 1 and 2 or 3 




2 units 




Mathematics 11 




1 unit 




Geography 1 




1 unit 




Expression 1 




1 unit 




English 1, 3, 13 




3 units 




Physiology 2 or Hygiene 1 




1 unit 




History 31 




1 unit 




Social Science 3 




1 unit 




Teaching 




2 units 




Music 4 




1 unit 




Six Electives 




6 units 








24 units 




In addition — 








Penmanship 








Music 4 c 








Physical Training — Men 


take Physical Training m2, 


1, 5 and 9. Women beg 


in with an elective, 


followed 


by w 1, 2 and 3, or w 4, 


5, 6. 






of the ( rrammar Grade Curriculum: 






Prescribed subjects 




18 units 




Electives 




6 units 





24 units 
Electives may be chosen at the option of the student, provided 



CURRICULA 



that three related subjects be elected in some one departmel 
that students may not elect more than two units in the fol\ _ e 
departments: Fine Arts, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Kinder- 
garten, Physical Education, Education, Special Education or Music. 

In choosing their electives students should be careful to take the 
subjects in the order recommended by the various departments in 
order that the proper sequence of subjects may be followed. 



INTERMEDIATE GRADE CURRICULUM 

Advisor — Professor Lott 

This curriculum meets the needs of those who are to teach in grades 
four, five and six. In these grades geography is one of the outstanding 
subjects and is consequently given a prominent place. 



Requirements 






^■*"-*HKducation 1, 2, 3 




3 units 




English 1, 2, 9 




3 units 




^0*** Nature Study 3 




1 unit 




^History 12, 36 




2 units 




s^ * Hygiene 1 or 
***^hysiology 2 




1 unit 




/a ^» Geography 1, 3, 5 




3 units 




Teaching 




2 units 




^■—Expression 1 




1 unit 




^..^^Mathematics 11 




1 unit 




^0*. Music 4 




1 unit ] 




^* Fine Arts 1, 2 




2 units 




^^■Industrial Arts 16 




1 unit 




Three electives 




3 units 








24 units 




In addition: 




i 




Penmanship. 








Music 4 c. 








Physical Training, four terms; 


elective, 


followed by w 4, 


5,6. 



80 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY CURRICULUM 

Advisor — Professor Roberts. 

In line with the most advanced practice in education, this course 
purposes to unify the kindergarten with the work of lower element- 
ary grades and to that end is intended to meet the needs thruout the 
state for well trained kindergartners and primary teachers. 

On account of the necessity for musical ability on the part of kinder- 
garten teachers, in addition to other general requirements, those who 
expect to follow this particular line must be able to play the -piano reason- 
ably well. 



Requirements 




Freshman Year 




Education 1, 2, 3 


3 units 


English 1, 2 


2 units 


Expression 1 


1 unit 


Fine Arts 1, 2 


2 units 


Kindergarten-Primary 1, 2 


2 units 


Music 4 


1 unit 


Industrial Arts 17 


1 unit 


- 


12 units 


In addition: 




Physical Training w7, 8, 9. 




Music 4c. 




Sophomore Year 




English 8 


1 unit 


Mathematics 11 


1 unit 


Nature Study 1 


1 unit 


History 30 


1 unit 


Music 5 


1 unit 


Teaching (Kindergarten) 


2 units 


Teaching (Primary) 


2 units 


Three electives 


3 units 






12 units 



CURRICULA 81 



In addition: 

Physical Training, elective. 

Penmanship. 
Suggested electives: 

Education 4. 

Home Economics 7 (Home Nursing). 

Social Science 1. 

English 4. 

Hygiene 1. 

Mythology 1. 

Modern Language. 

Geography. 

Expression 9. 

Expression 13. 



COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM 



Advisor — Professor Wells. 

The College offers no commercial work, but in connection with 
the Cleary Business College, Ypsilanti, Ferris Institute, Big Rapids, 
and the Detroit Business Institute and the Detroit Business University, 
Detroit, it offers a two year commercial course. The college accepts 
the commercial work of these institutions and requires a year's work 
in residence. The student pays the regular fee of the business college 
in which he takes his commercial work. For the work done at the 
Normal College he pays the regular college tuition fees. 

Subjects required in the Normal College: 
Education 1, 2, 3 and 4. 
Social Science 3 and 5. 
English 1. 
Geography 1. 
Four electives. 

In addition: 

Physical Training — Men take Physical Training ml, 2 and 5 or 
9; women take Physical Training wl, 2 and 3. 
11 



82 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



FINE ARTS CURRICULUM 

Students specializing in Fine Arts should take the following named 
courses in the order given: 



FIRST YEAR 

Education 1 
Fine Arts 1 
Fine Arts 2 
Expression 1 
Physical Training 

Education 2 

Fine Arts 3 

Industrial Arts 17 

English 1 

Penmanship and Phys. Tr. 

Education 3 

Fine Arts 16 or 18 

Fine Arts 5 

Fine Arts 9 

Physical Training 



SECOND YEAR 

Education 4 
Fine Arts 6 
Industrial Arts 15 
Geography 1 or History 31 
Physical Training 

Fine Arts 15 
Industrial Arts 7 
Teaching Art (2 units) 



Fine Arts 17 

Mathematics 11 or Nature Study 

Elective — Fine Arts 

Teaching in Grade (1 unit) 



Students combining Fine Arts and Industrial Arts should take the 
following subjects: 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Courses 1, 2, 7, 15, 16, 17. 

FINE ARTS 

Courses L, 2 or 3, 5, 6, 9, 15 or 16, 17 or 18. 

For description of Industrial Arts courses see page 83. 

For combined course in Music and Mix; Arts sec page 84. 
In addition: 

The additional subjects mentioned under the Grammar Grade 
curriculum, Bee page 78. 

Student! specializing in Fine Arts are required to teach two terms 
in Fine Arts and one term in the grades. 



MUSIC CURRICULA 



83 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 



Fall 
Education 1 
Fine Arts 1 
Industrial Arts 1 
Mathematics 11 
Physical Training 

Industrial Arts 3 
Industrial Arts 17 
Elective 
Teaching 

(Grade or Special) 



Winter 

Education 2 
Fine Arts 2 or 3 
Industrial Arts 16 
English 1 
Physical Training 

SECOND YEAR 

Industrial Arts 7 
Industrial Arts 4 
Elective 
Teaching 
Penmanship 



Spring 
Education 3 
Fine Arts 9 
Industrial Arts 2 
Nature Study 1 
Physical Training 

Industrial Arts 5 
Industrial Arts 15 
Elective 
Geography 1 



MUSIC 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

The Normal College offers exceptional opportunity for the training 
of teachers of public school music. The Conservatory of Music, which 
is affiliated with the college, offers instruction in voice, piano, organ 
and orchestral instruments. (See page 29, Conservatory.) One 
with a fairly good voice and an appreciation of music, who is also a 
high school graduate, would be qualified to enter the Public School 
Music Department. For years the college has been unable to meet 
the calls for teachers of public school music. 



TWO YEARS* 


PUBLIC 


SCHOOL MUSIC CURRICULUM 


First Year 


Second Year 


1. Music 1 




1. Music 11 


2. Music 14 




2. English 4 


3. English 1 




3. Teaching Music in Training 


4. Education 1 




School 


5. Music 26 







84 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



1. 


Music 2 


2. 


Music 15 


3. 


Music 5 


4. 


Education 2 


5. 


Music 26 


1. 


Music 2 


2. 


Music 16 


3. 


Music 6 


4. 


Education 3 


5. 


Music 26 



1. 

3. 


Music 12 
English 5 

Teaching Music in Training 
School 


1. 
2. 

3. 
4. 


Music 13 
English 8 
Music 8 
Elective 



The first year's work must be completed before entering the Train- 
ing Department. 

All students are required to classify in Normal Choir (Music 29), 
which assembles evenings thruout the college year as follows: 
Tuesday — 6:15-7:15 Sopranos and Contraltos 

7:15-8:15 Tenors and Basses. 
Thursday— 7-8 Full Choir. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC AND DRAWING 

The current systems of public schools create a demand for Super- 
visors of Music in connection with some other subject — the popular 
other subject, from the standpoint of the demand, has come to be 
drawing. The Normal College is unable to fill the positions that 
come to the notice of its officers each year for Supervisors of these two 
subjects. The frequency of these opportunities to our graduates 
for excellenl positions has created a popular desire to enter this double 
desire that is sometimes not justified by sufficient latent 
ability in both subjects in the student. Normal Conservatory opens 
its doors for the purpose of instruction, encouragement and inspira- 
tion to ;tll ambitious workers in the arts but it enrolls upon its roster 
of prospective Supervisors only those who have special talent for both 
lected. Sometimes students prepare in both subjects and 
perience drop one subject, becoming specialists in 
either music or drawingi as talent and circumstances determine. 

The rariou drawing subjects presented serve as a preparation 
for teaching art in the grades and in the high school. The aim is to 



MUSIC CURRICULA 



85 



furnish the student not only with material of practical nature, but 
also with a background of general artistic knowledge. 

The schedules of study are arranged under the assumption that 
all students shall remain for the full course of two years. Others 
entering irregularly may find it impossible to graduate on a short- 
ened period of residence because of conflicts in required work. 

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 

First Year SecondYear 



1. 


Fine Arts 1 


1. 


Fine Arts 9 


S 2. 


Music 1 


2. 


Music 11 


3 3. 


English 1 


3. 


Music 14 


* 4. 


Education 1 


4. 


Teaching Music in Training 


5. 


Music 26 




School 


1. 


Fine Arts 2 or 3 


1. 


Elective, Fine Arts 


w 2. 


Music 1 


2. 


Fine Arts 16 or 17 


E-3. 


Music 5 


3. 


Music 15 


£ 4. 


Education 2 


4. 


Education 3 


5. 


Music 26 


5. 


Teaching Music in Training 
School 


1. 


Fine Arts 6 


A. 


Fine Arts 15 




Fine Arts 5 


2. 


Elective Fine Arts 


g 3 ' 


Music 3 


3. 


Music 8 


02 4 


Music 6 


4. 


Teaching Drawing in 


5. 


Music 26 




Training School 



All students specializing in Public School Music or taking any 
course in combination with Public School music must take private 
lessons at the Conservatory in both singing and piano playing thru- 
.out the two years' residence, unless after examination by the Director 
of the Conservatory they are found skillful enough to be excused from 
one of these studies for a part of the time. 



RURAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

Altho this curriculum especially fits one to teach in rural schools 
the certificate to which it leads is valid in any Michigan school. 



86 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Two- Year Curriculum 

Education 1, 2 2 units 

Rural Education *1, 2, 3, 5 4 units 

English 2, 1, 8 3 units 

Nature Study 3 1 unit 

Agriculture! 1 unit 

Home Economics 55 1 unit 

Industrial Arts 17 1 unit 

Fine Arts 1, 2 2 units 

Music 4 1 unit 

Geography 1, 3 2 units 

Expression 1 1 unit 

Social Science 3 1 unit 

History 31 1 unit 

Physiology 2 or Hygiene 1 1 unit 

Teaching 2 units 

In addition: 
Penmanship. 

Physical Training, w4, 5 and 6 and elective. 
Rural Education 6, a one-hour course for one year. 

Graduates from County Normal Training Classes who are also 
graduates from approved high schools are given credit in eight subjects, 
as follows: Education 1, Rural Education 2, Fine Arts 1, English 2, 
and four Teachers' Courses. 



RURAL SUPERINTENDENTS 

The movement for consolidated schools in Michigan has created 
a demand for men to fill the Buperintendencies of these schools and at 
the same time teach agriculture. Such men should have training in 
public school organization and administration and also a technical 
course in agriculture. No single institution in Michigan furnishes 
thic preparation. 

The Agricultural College offers the training in agriculture and the 



•On approval of the President and the acting head of the depart! 
mentj county norma] graduates may take Rural Education 4 in lieu of 
ourae. 



MUSIC CURRICULA 87 



normal schools offer the training in public school administration. To 
meet the situation the normal schools and the Agricultural College 
have adopted a plan of cooperation whereby students may pursue a 
two year curriculum at the normal schools, which will combine public 
school organization and administration and rural sociology and the 
basic courses in agriculture. This two years' curriculum w T ill be given 
two years of credit at the Michigan Agricultural College. 

English 1 and 3 2 units 

Mathematics 14 and 15 2 units 

Education 1, 2, 3, and 16 4 units 

Teachers' Courses 2 units 

Teaching 2 units 

Preferential Agricultural Courses 

Agriculture 2 (Soils) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Farm Crops) 1 unit 

Agriculture 4 (Animal Husbandry) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Gardening) 1 unit 

Agriculture 8 (Rural Organization) 1 unit 

Preferential Science Courses 

Chemistry 3 and 4 2 units 

Physics 4 and 5 2 units 

Botany 1 and 5 2 units 

Desirable Elective Courses 

Geography 1 Botany 2 

Geology 1 Agriculture 6 

Zoology 4, 6 or 9 Chemistry 7 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

On account of the demand thruout the country for specially pre- 
pared training teachers the College will offer to a limited number 
of applicants an opportunity for pursuing such a course of study. 

All candidates for this course must have completed the work for 
the life certificate, and must have furnisht satisfactory evidence of 
their general teaching ability. 

The superintendent of the Training Department acts as patron 



58 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

for students pursuing this line of work. Admission to this course 
shall be based upon: 

1. Scholarship. 

2. Personality. 

3. Success in teaching children. 

4. Ability to work with adults. 

The Curriculum Itself Consists of: 

1. Eight units elected from third or fourth year college sub- 

jects. 

2. An equivalent of four units of work in the Training Depart- 

ment as assistant to the regular training teachers in making 
curricula of study, doing model teaching, doing special 
and general critic work, and in a study of the principles 
and methods of constructive criticism. 

See under department of Special Education for requirements for 
entrance upon this curriculum. 

Special Education, 1 to 14 inclusive 14 units 

Typewriting 1 unit 

Sociology 1 unit 

Physical Education 1 unit 

Home Economics 2 units 



ONE YEAR CURRICULA-rLIMITED CERTIFICATES 

Besides the regular work outlined in the preceding pages, there 
are two forms of limited certificates given for partial curricula. 

1. Three Year Certificate Curriculum 

A Three Year Certificate will be given upon the completion by 
high school graduates of fourteen units Of work, as specified below. 
>■. il! require one year and one .summer term of work. The certificate 
ilid for three years in grades below the tenth. 



I 



MUSIC CURRICULA 



89 



List of Subjects 




Education 1, 2, and 3 


3 units 


Teaching 


2 units 


Fine Arts 1 or 2 


1 unit 


English 1 


1 unit 


Music 4 


1 unit 


Six teachers' courses 


6 units 


Mathematics 11 




Geography 1 ^ 




English 3 ^ 




History 31 N 




Physiology 2 or 




Hygiene 1 




Expression 1 





Total 



14 units 



In addition students are required to take: 

1. Physical Training two terms (Phys. Tr. wl and 2 or 4 or 5). 

2. Music 4 c. 

3. Penmanship. 

Students who take out this limited certificate and who return 
for the life certificate afterwards will be required to complete ten 
units of work for the life certificate. 



2. Rural School Certificate Curriculum. 

This curriculum is designed for students who expect to teach in 
the rural schools. Graduation from an accepted high school is required 
for entrance. Fourteen units of work requiring attendance for one 
year and one summer term are necessary to complete the curriculum. 
The certificate granted on the completion of this curriculum is valid 
in any school in Michigan for three years. 



90 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



One-Year Curriculum 




Rural Education 1, 2, and 5 


3 units 


English 2, 1, and 8 


3 units 


Agriculture 1 


1 unit 


Industrial Arts 17 


1 unit 


Music 4 


1 unit 


Geography 1 


1 unit 


Expression 1 


1 unit 


Social Science 3 


1 unit 


Teaching 


2 units 



In addition: 
Penmanship, 

Hygiene, a two-hour course for one term. 
Physical Training, two terms, Phys. Tr. w4 and w5. 
Rural Education 6, a one-hour course for one year. 

EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

The State Normal College offers two varieties of non-resident 
work, Correspondence and Extension. 

Extension work was inaugurated by the college at the request 
of certain cities of Michigan and has been in operation for four years. 
The following rules govern correspondence or extension courses : 

1. All persons desiring to do correspondence or extension work 
must make application to the Extension Committee on blanks pro- 
vided by the college. No credit will be given unless this require- 
ment has been met. 

2. All of our certificate curricula presuppose graduation from 
a four-year high school or its equivalent, and no certificate is granted 
for less than one year (twelve units) of resident work. 

Students who enter the Normal College having done resident 
work in any of the other normal schools of the state are held to a mini- 
mum resident requirement of two terms (eight units). 

Students who h;ive completed work on our life certificate cur- ■ 
riculum and are working on the dfegree curriculum are required to 
do al leasi eight units in residence, the last four of which should be 
<]<>])(■ immediately preceding graduation. 

.''». Work (lone by correspondence or extension shall not count 



MUSIC CURRICULA 91 



to reduce the units of resident work required for the several certifi- 
cates or degrees. 

4. All correspondence or extension courses of instruction are 
the equivalent of corresponding courses offered in residence. 

5. Not more than one-fourth of the units yet remaining to be 
done for any certificate or degree may be done by correspondence 
or extension; for example, a person holding a limited certificate and 
needing ten units for a life certificate may do two by cor- 
respondence or extension; a person holding a life certificate and need- 
ing twenty-four units for a degree may do six by correspondence or 
extension. 

6. Students may not take more than two extension or two cor- 
respondence subjects at one time except on approval of the committee. 

7. It is expected that a correspondence subject will be completed 
in not less than twelve weeks or more than thirty-six weeks from the 
time it is begun. 

8. Any student taking correspondence work, who has not re- 
ported within ninety days, will forfeit the fee he has paid. There 
will be no refund of fees to students who have partially completed a 
course. 

9. Students doing work in residence will not be permitted to 
carry courses in correspondence except on approval of the committee. 

10. Students who are not high school graduates will not be per- 
mitted to carry extension or correspondence courses without permission 
of the committee. 

11. Any person desiring to do work for credit outside of reg- 
ular class work with a teacher of the institution shall make applica- 
tion to the Extension Committee. 



Department Courses 



CHEMISTRY 



Professor IL W. Peet. 
Assistant Professor Byron Corbin Mr. Gregory McCloskey 

The class room and laboratories are on the third floor of Science 
Hall. Students specializing in home economics are required to take 
Courses 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 11; those specializing in physical education, 
Courses 1, 2, 3, and 7. 

A three-year curriculum combining the Physical and Biological 
Sciences and also the Physical and Mathematical Sciences is suggested 
in this catalog in the Physical Science Department. Note that Chem- 
istry 3, 4, 5, and 7 are required. 

Students specializing in chemistry should confer with the head 
of the department as early as possible and outline the electives that 
will best meet their peculiar needs. 

Attention is called to the Chemistry Club described in the front 
pari of the catalog. 

1. General Chemistry. 1 unit. 

A study of the history, occurrence, preparation, properties and 
of the most important non-metals, with their principal 
compounds and of the elementary principles underlying chem- 
istry. Lectures, illustrated by experiments, text-book and lab- 
oratory work. Hie Laboratory hours to be arranged with the 
clfl sifier or instructor. 
Pall and Winter terms. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

2, Gt ru red f 'hemistry. 1 unit. 

continuation of Chemistry 1. This course completes 
the study of the most common non-metals and takes up a 
brief study of the niet.tls with a few lessons in organic chera- 



CHEMISTRY 93 



istry. The additional laboratory hours are to be arranged 

with the classifier or instructor. 

Winter and Spring terms. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

College Chemistry. 1 unit. 

An advanst course in general and inorganic chemistry. The 
theory and fundamental principles of chemistry are empha- 
sized. Follows chemistry 1 and 2 or an approved course in 
a high school. It is a foundation course and must precede 
all other courses in chemistry. The laboratory hours are to 
be arranged. It may be elected as a teacher's course. 
Fall and Spring terms. Professor Peet. 

Qualitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This is largely a laboratory course calling for two hours' work 
daily. The lectures include a study of the theory of solution 
and the laws of chemical equilibrium. The laboratory work 
includes a study of the methods of separating and identifying 
the common metals and acids. Constant practice is given in 
analyzing substances unknown to the student. 
Fall and Winter terms. Professor Peet and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Corbin. 

Quantitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This is a laboratory course requiring two hours' work daily. 
The class also meets twice a week for quiz and instruction. 
The work is both gravimetric and volumetric, the gravimetric 
portion including the determination, in simple compounds, of 
the common metals and acid anhydrides and the volumetric 
work including the preparation of standard solutions, the de- 
termination by alkalimetry of a few of the common acids and 
alkalies, and the determination of the elements, iron, chlorine 
and iodine by methods of oxidation and reduction. Students 
get practical work in making up solutions for the laboratory. 
Winter and Spring terms. Professor Peet and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Corbin. 

Quantitative Analysis. 1 unit. 
This is a continuation of Chemistry 5. It includes analysis 
of brass, technical analysis of limestone, and foundation work 
for analysis of minerals and fertilizers. 
Spring term. Professor Peet. 



94 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

7. Organic Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by one year of high school chem- 
istry or its equivalent. An elementary course in general 
organic chemistry, including both alphatic and aromatic com- 
pounds. Special attention is given to compounds having an 
important relation to household arts, physiological chemistry 
and agriculture. Laboratory hour to be arranged. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Peet and Assistant Professor 
Corbin. 

8. Organic Preparations. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4 and 7. Labor- 
tory work, 10 hours a week. A number of typical organic 
compounds are prepared. This course is valuable in helping 
to give the student a better understanding of Chemistry 7 and 
is one of the best courses in chemistry for teaching the setting 
up and handling of apparatus. 
Fall or Winter term. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

9. Food Analysis. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4 or 7. The lec- 
tures and recitations twice a week deal with food industries. 
The laboratory work includes the complete analysis of milk 
and milk products, analysis of cereals, sugars, fats and testing 
for adulteration of foods. 
Spring term. Professor Peet 

10. Food Analysis, Advanst. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 9. This is a lab- 
oratory course calling for two hours' work daily. The work 
varies according to the wants of the students, but includes 
i be study of sugars, protein, fats and sanitary analysis of water. 
Professor Peet 

11 Chi nn.lrij of Foods and Nutrition. 1 unit. 

This course includes a study of the carbohydrates, fats, pro- 
tein, enzymes, the chemistry of digestion, fuel value and energy 
required, the body, conditions governing energy and food 
standards, food laws and adulteration of 
foor].«. The laboratory work lakes up simple tests and prop- 
erties of carbohydrates, fats, protein, digestion ^experiments, 



CHEMISTRY 95 



analysis of milk, a study of textile fibres and adulteration of 
foods. 
Professor Peet. 

2. Advanst Qualitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4. It is a two- 
hour laboratory course, recitations twice a week. Some time 
is given to the separation of metals in the presence of phos- 
phates and oxalates, the analysis of alloys and the separa- 
tion of complex mixtures. A more thoro study is given to 
the ionization theory, law of mass action and equations of 
oxidation and reduction than is given in Chemistry 4. 
Winter term. Professor Peet. 

3. Coal and Water Analysis. 1 unit. 

The complete commercial analysis of coal, including the de- 
termination of the heating value with a calorimeter, is of- 
fered. The ordinary chemical analysis of water is made and 
the bacterial count. A laboratory course ten hours a week. 
Professor Peet and Assistant Professor Corbin. 

i. Physical Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4. A study of the 
laws and theories that relate to the behavior of gases, liquids 
and solids; the phase rule; chemical equilibrium and electro- 
chemistry. No laboratory work. 
Winter term. Professor Peet. 

5. Physical-Chemical Measurements. 1 unit. 

Laboratory Work. A study of molecular weight determina- 
tions by different methods, viscosity, surface tension, conduc- 
tivity, heat of reaction and work with the polariscope and 
refractometer. This course must be preceded or accompanied 
by Chemistry 5 and Chemistry 14. Professor Peet. 

3. History of Chemistry. Y% unit or 1 unit. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 4. Lecture, text and seminary hours 
to be arranged. Two times a week. Professor Peet. 



96 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



EDUCATION 



Professor Charles O. Hoyt. Professor Samuel B. Laird. 

Professor Nathan A. Harvey. 

Professor Henry C. Lot. * Associate Professor 

Horace Z. Wilber. 

Associate Professor Theo. W. H. Irion 

^Associate Professor Marion S. Pittman 

Miss Ella Smith 

1. Psychology I. 1 unit. 

The purpose of psychology is the description and explanation 
of mental phenomena. This course is concerned with the facts 
of attention, nervous and motor activities and their inter- 
relations, and the cognitive processes — sensation, perception, 
imagination, memory, conception and thinking. The work is 
based on a textbook, supplemented by readings and reports. 
Required work. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Professors, Laird, Harvey, 
Lott, Irion, Norris, Miss Smtih. 

/' chology II. 1 unit. 
This course is a continuation of course I and deals principally 
with Mental Measurement. It includes the reading with 
demonstrations, of the Binet Tests, and class examination by 
the Army Mental Tests, Otis Tests, and other forms of group 
intelligence tests, as well as many single association tests and 
jurements. The course also includes an examination of 
the psychological characteristics of the three periods of in- 
fancy, childhood and adolescence, and an application to them 
of the psychological principles learned in course I. It is con- 

d a laboratory course, and the basis of the work is 

• i [mentation. Required work. 

t( : and spring terms. Professors Laird, Harvey, Lott, 
L ton, Norris, Mise Smith. 

! ' ' ;. 1 unit. 

'Ili« purp Course it to teach the things which it is j 

•running teacher to know, and which 



/ 






EDUCATION 97 



will the most certainly contribute to the success of her work 
in teaching. Starting with the assumption that the aim of 
education is to enable the pupil to live in the community in 
accordance with the best ideals that the community represents, 
much emphasis is laid upon the social side of education, making 
the school conform to the community ideal, and develop- 
ing the course of study in harmony with it. Principles un- 
derlying the methods of maintaining discipline, interest, the 
motivation of school work, the conduct of the recitation, analysis 
of the study process, the psychological factors in teaching, 
and methods of measuring the teaching products are topics 
of fundamental importance. About one-third of the time is 
devoted to an examination and use of the most common ed- 
ucation scales and tests for educational measurements. Hand 
writing scales, spelling scales, arithmetic scales and reading 
scales are used. Required work and presupposes Education 
1 and 2. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Professors Laird, Harvey, Lott, 
Irion, Norr's, Miss Smith. 

History of Education is one of the four units required in educa- 
tion. As such unit choice may be made from courses 4, 5, 6, 
or 32. 

History of Modern Education. 1 unit. 

An historical study of the principles of education growing 
out of the development of educational and social ideals, rep- 
resented by the different educational movements in modern 
times. The attempt is made to study the meaning of accepted 
principles by tracing them to their sources. Text: Hoyt, 
Studies in the History of Modern Education. Required and 
presupposes courses 1, 2, 3. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Professor Hoyt and Associate 
Professor Norris. 

History of Ancient Education. 1 unit. 
An historical study of the educational movements that con- 
stitute educational endeavor in the Western World down to 
the beginning of modern times. The course aims (1) to work 
out an intelligible account of the relation of these successive 
movements to the contemporary social movements; (2) to 
follow the evolution of educational content, tecjmic, equipment, 
13 



98 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

new ideals and new theories; (3) by comparison and contrast 
of these elements with present conditions, to arrive at a better 
appreciation of our own times; and (4) to consider our indebted- 
ness to ancient and medieval endeavors. Lectures, readings 
and class discussions. This course may be elected as required 
work in place of course 4. Presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. 
Fall and winter terms. Associate Professor Norris. 

History of Education in the United States. 1 unit. 

A consideration of the historical development of education in 
the United States and of the influences affecting it. Special 
attention is given to the growth of the various educational 
agencies, and to state and national organizations. This course 
may be taken as required work in place of course 4. Text: 
Cubberley, Public Education in the United States. Presup- 
poses courses 1, 2, and 3. Professor Hoyt. 

7. Advanst Child, Study, 1 unit. 

An experimental laboratory course, dealing with the methods 
of the measurement of mental processes and with the various 
tests and devices for determining the mental capacity of chil- 
dren. Laboratory work, lectures, readings. Not open to 
freshmen; presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. 
Spring term. Professor Harvey. 

8. Psychology of Individual Differences. 1 unit. 

This course is complementary to the courses in general psy- 
chology and is designed to enable teachers to determine the 
characteristics which constitute the peculiarities of individual 
children. Laboratory work, lectures, readings. Not open to 
freshmen. Winter Imn. Professor Harvey. 

9. Tin J\ sychology of Exceptional Children. 1 unit. 
An introduction to the general science of intelligence giving 

iotance to the class room teacher and the principal 

in diagnosing the nature of exceptional -children. Both sub- 

mi! and gifted children are studied. The work consists of 

;t-book discussions, Lectures, special reports and clinical 

urse is not open to freshmen. 

Associate Professor Irion. ■ 



EDUCATION . 99 

10. Educational Measurement. 1 unit. 

An advanst course, not open to Freshmen. 
In this course, instruction is given in the methods of collect- 
ing, tabulating, and representing educational data. The vari- 
ous measures of frequency, distribution, averages, relation- 
ship, correlation are studied. Constant use is made of data 
collected by using the various scales and tests that have been 
devised for measuring educational products. 
Fall term. Professor Harvey. 

12. Psychology of the Common School Subjects. 1 unit. 

This is an advanst course not open to freshmen, and must 
be preceded by courses 1, 2, and 3. It is intended to summate 
the work that has been done in experimental pedagogy and in 
measuring the efficiency of teaching. An evaluation is given 
of the methods of teaching penmanship, spelling, reading, 
arithmetic and grammar, and an examination made of the 
various scales and tests for determining efficiency in the com- 
mon school branches. Professor Harvey. 

13. Psychology of High School Subjects. 1 unit. 

A consideration of the psychological problems involved in 
teaching and learning the various high school subjects. Also 
an analysis of these problems with respect to subject matter 
and methods of attack, and a discussion of the mental pro- 
cesses involved. Presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. Not open 
to freshmen. Professor Lott. 

.15. Social Psychology. 1 unit. 

A psychological study of the social life. The course is a con- 
sideration of the bearings of modern psychology upon the 
methods of social evolution and organization. The basal 
traits of the individual serve to explain social phenomena. 
Lectures, reports, discussions. Presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. 
Fall and summer terms. Professor Lott. 

15A. Educational Sociology. 1 unit. 

A development of some of the principles of Social Psychology, 
and the adaption of these principles to educational theory 
and practice. Particular emphasis is placed upon group 



100 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

and community activities through which the individual is 
educated. Readings, reports, discussions. 
Winter term. , Professor Lott. 

16. School Administration. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the problems of school management 
from the standpoint of the superintendent. Consideration is 
given to the development of our school system, its plan, struc- 
ture, and the agencies by which controlled. The place of the 
school in the community, the functions and relationships of 
superintendent, teachers, and boards of education, are given 
special attention. Lectures, readings and class discussions. 
Text: Cubberley. Public School administration. Presup- 
poses courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 (or 5). 
Spring term. Professor Hoyt. 

18. The Socialized Curriculum. 1 unit. 

An introductory course in the theory of the formulation of 

a school curriculum that will meet the requirements of modern 

social conditions. Vocational activities are considered as 

projects for social cooperation, and problems involved are 

presented for analysis and solution. Lectures, reports, and 

discussions. 

Spring and summer terms. Professor Lott. 

20. Philosophy of Education. 1 unit. 

This course consists of a study of the philosophical bases of 
education and of their relation to the various lines of human 
activity. The different aspects of education are considered 
in the light of their historical development and their bearing 
on the solution of present day problems. Textbook, assigned 
readings, reports, and class discussions. Text: Dewey, Dem- 
ocracy and Education. Not open to freshmen. 
Spring term, Professor Hoyt. 

21. Introduction to Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A itudy of the fundamental problems of philosophy, supple- 
menting the courses in the history of education and furnish- 
ing a ba8U for further philosophical study. Lectures, readings 
and claflfl discussions. Not Open to freshmen. 

".•). Professor Hoyt. 






EDUCATION 101 



History of Ancient Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of Greek philosophy from Thales to Aristotle. The 
work is based on a textbook, supplemented by lectures, readings, 
and class discussions. Not open to freshmen. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Norris. 

History of Medieval Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of the development of philosophy from Aristotle 
to Descartes, with a view to determining the medieval sources 
of modern thought. Textbook, readings, and class discus- 
sions. Not open to freshmen. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Norris. 

History of Modern Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of the doctrine of the modern philosophers from Des- . 
cartes to Kant, both with regard to their relation to each 
other and their influence on the modern educators. Textbook, 
readings, and class discussions. Not open to freshmen. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Norris. 

Logic. 1 unit. 

A study of the inductive and deductive methods of reason- 
ing and of their relation to argumentative discourse, 
together with a consideration of the laws of thought and their 
application. For advanst students only. 
Winter term. Professor Laird. 

Ethics. 1 unit. 

This course involves a consideration of the ethical themes 
from the historical standpoint, the philosophical interpretation 
leading to a study of the more important social and modern 
questions. This course may be elected by sophomores. Text: 
Coffin, The Socialized Conscience. 
Spring term. Professor Laird. 

American Thought and Education. 1 unit. 

A presentation of the movements and tendencies in American 
education, based upon European and American thought. This 
course will offer an excellent preparation for a more intelligent 
understanding of the growing problems of education and 



102 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

will pave the way for a criticism of many educational prac- 
tices and experiments. For advanst students only. 
Spring term. Professor Hoyt. 

31. Special Problems in Educational Psychology. 1 unit. 

A course intended for advanst students and of special interest 
to principals and supervisors. The work is planned to be of 
practical value in meeting the fundamental psychological 
problems of the school and the class room. The work will be 
conducted thru text-book assignments and discussions, lec- 
tures, reports and special investigations. The course is not 
open to freshmen. 
Associate Professor Irion. 

32. The Evolution of Educational Theory. 1 unit. 

This is a treatment of the history of education from the stand- 
point of the different educational movements, especially in 
relation to the great movements of civilization. The aim is 
to discover the causes and effects of the changes in educational 
theory. The course may be elected as required work in educa- 
tion or it may be used as a degree subject. 
Professor Hoyt. 



l/I 



ENGLISH 



Professor Florus A. Barbour 
<i ah: Professor Abigail Pearce 
Associate Professor Alma Blount 
kssoi i atk Professor Estelle Downing 
ociate Professor Harriet Mackenzie 

Assistant PROFESSOR E8TABROOK Rankin 
Assistant PROFESSOR ELIZABETH CARET 



Freshman Composition. 1 unit. 
Tin- course includes the making of bibliographies; note-taking; 
the outlining of themes; a study of unity, coherence, and em- 
phasis, as applied to the theme, the paragraph, and the sentence! 
the discussion of various methods of paragraph development! 



ENGLISH 103 

and a brief study of words for the purpose of arousing interest 
in vocabulary. Constant practice in writing is given thruout 
the course. 

From six to eight sections will be formed during each term 
of the year. 

2. English Grammar. 1 unit. 

Open only to students specializing in primary work. An ele- 
mentary review of English Grammar. The course includes 
an analysis of sentences with special reference to punctuation, 
a rapid review of inflections and fundamental constructions, 
and such a study of grammatical usage as the teacher in the 
primary grades needs special training upon. The entire course 
is more elementary in character than course 3. 

3. Teachers' Grammar. 1 unit. 

(a) A rapid academic review of the subject in Whitney's Es- 
sentials of English Grammar. In connection with analysis 
and composition of sentences attention will be given to the 
common errors in speech and writing which teachers in the 
public schools are most frequently called upon to correct. 
Model lesson plans will also be suggested for teaching special 
topics. Required of all students upon the General Course 
and of all students specializing in English. 

4. Principles of Criticism 1. 1 unit. 

For freshman specializing in English, either as a . major or 
minor. The elementary principles of literary criticism are ap- 
plied to the study of selections from the American poets. The 
main purpose of the course is to introduce freshman students 
to an intelligent study of short poems, and as a result of such 
study to enable them to teach such poems more effectively in 
the different grades of the public schools. The course 
presupposes a high school course in English Literature, and is 
open to students on the grammar grade curriculum. 
Sections are formed during each term. 

5. Principles of Criticism 2. 1 unit. 

A study of American prose in accordance with the method 
suggested for course 4, and in all cases to be preceded by course 
4. The course is deemed especially valuable as an opportunity 



104 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

for studying different types of prose; the essay, narrative and 
descriptive (Irving); the essay, meditative and philosophical 
(Emerson); the short story (Hawthorne and P.oe); minute 
observation (Thoreau); and the oration in Webster's reply to 
Hayne. Different classics may be chosen from time to time 
with the same general purpose in mind. Supplementing 
course 4 the somewhat intensive study of different types of 
prose in Principles of Criticism 2 is intended to promote more 
effective teaching of prose selections in the different series of 
readers in the elementary grades. At the same time it affords 
a preparation for more advanst courses in English for those who 
are preparing to teach in high schools. 

Winter and spring terms. Professor Barbour, and Associate 
Professor Pearce. 

6a. English Literature. 

A rapid survey of the History of English Literature. Text-book 
study will be supplemented by lectures and such illustrative 
reading as there may be time for in a single quarter. The main 
purpose of the course is to review rapidly the development of 
English Literature, especially from the Age of Elizabeth to the 
close of the Victorian Era. As an aid to students in making 
out high school courses the Uniform Entrance Requirements 
in English will be briefly considered as to their suitability for 
reading as representative classics. 

8. Literature for the Primary Grades. 1 unit. 

The work of this course consists of lectures, required reading, 
reports, observation of model lessons, practice in story telling 
and dramatization. Such a detailed study of the literature 
for children is made as gives a basis for the appreciation, selec- 
tion, and presentation of the most suitable material for the 
primary grades. Fables, folk-tales, fairy-tales, myths, legends, 
Bible stories, realistic stories, animal stories, rhymes, and simple 
poetry are considered. This is a required course for sophomores 
who are specializing in primary work, for those taking the Rural 
curriculum, and may be also taken as a degree course after 
conference with Professor MacKenzie. English 1 must pre- 
Cede English s. 
Fall, Winter, and spring terms. Associate Professor MacKenzie. 



ENGLISH 105 



9. Literature for the Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 1 unit. 

The work of this course is identical with that of 8 except that 
the literature studied is that suitable for the intermediate and 
grammar grades. Myths, Bible stories, tales of adventure, 
chivalry, romance, and history, simple narrative and lyric 
poetry, are read and discust with reference to their literary 
qualities, their fitness for various grades, and the best methods 
for their presentation. This course is required of sophomores 
upon the General Curriculum who are making English their 
major or minor elective, and may also receive degree credit. 
English 1 must precede English 9. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor MacKenzie. 

10. English Fiction. 1 unit. 

A short course of lectures upon (1) the history of English 
fiction and the development of the modern novel; (2) upon 
the plot, its qualities, and technical construction. Special 
study of different types will follow, particular attention being 
paid to plot, setting, and character sketching. The aim is to 
make this course helpful and suggestive not only to high school 
teachers but also to any teachers of narrative prose. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Pearce. 

11. Advanst Rhetoric 1. Description and Narration. 1 unit. 

A study of models, discussion of principles and practice in 
writing. Supplementary reading thruout the course. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Downing, and 
Assistant Professor MacKenzie. 

12. Advanst Rhetoric 2. Exposition and Argument. 1 unit. 

Same general plan as in English 11 with work in note-taking 
and outlining, and a little practice in oral theme-making. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Downing. 
Note — English courses 11 and 12 are planned primarily to 
meet the needs of students specializing in English, but others 
who are qualified to do the work are eligible. Both courses 
presuppose a knowledge of the elementary principles of rhe- 
toric and the ability to write with a fair degree of clearness and 
accuracy. Either course may be taken without the other, 
and the sequence is not important. The models are secured 



106 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

from various sources. Either course may be made to count 
on a degree. 

13. Teachers' Composition. 1 unit. 

This aims to fit students for teaching composition in the grammar 
grades and high school. It includes a study of theme-subjects, 
methods of making assignments, criticism and rating of papers, 
oral composition, picture work, vocational English, correlation 
and cooperation, course of study, text-books, and other matters 
vital to effective composition work. It is carried on by outside 
reading, discussions, observation of composition classes, and 
the making of model lessons. Special students of English and 
all others who have done satisfactory work in Freshman Com- 
position are eligible to the course. The work is credited as a 
teachers' course and will be offered one hour each term. Asso- 
ciate Professor Downing. 

14. Anglo-Saxon. 1 unit. 

Cook's First Book of Old English, followed by a study of the 
history of the English Language. The course is an elementary 
study of linguistic principles from a historical point of view, 
with special reference to the application of such a method 
to forms, constructions, and idioms of the English language. 
The course is especially recommended to students who expect 
to teach English grammar in high schools. Because of the 
close relation between English and other Germanic languages 
it is interesting and useful to students and teachers of German. 
Aa an elementary course in the methods of historical study it is 
valuable also to special students of the Classics. Associate 
Professor Blount. 

15. Nineteenth Century Poetry. 1 unit. 

A study of nineteenth century poetry, with special consideration 
of Shelly, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Morris, and Swineburne. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Blount. 

peare. 1 unit. 
A brief course of lectures on ilio technical construction of 
the drama, followed by an analytical study of Hamlet, Mac- 
beth, and King Lear. Special attention is given to the de- 
veloj Ji" i I of M v pl< I, and to the consistency of the characters! 



ENGLISH 107 



with the plot. Teachers of literature in high schools will find 
the course stimulating and suggestive as a preparation for 
teaching Shakespeare. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Barbour. 

17. English Masterpieces. 1 unit. 

Six weeks of the quarter are given to the study of Wordsworth. 
Minor poems are given special study while the Prelude and the 
Excursion are discussed in lectures and thru assigned reading. 
The remainder of the quarter is devoted to Carlyle's Sartor 
Resartus. Students who have had courses in Philosophy and 
the Bible will find the Masterpiece study above outlined an 
inspiring corroboration of the fundamental teaching of Biblical 
Literature. 
Spring term. Professor Barbour. 

18. Contemporary Drama. 1 unit. 

This course will comprise: (1) a study of some 19th century 
dramatists, — Ibsen, in English translation, Shaw, Pinero, 
Yeats, Jones, and others; (2) characteristics and tendencies 
of the present drama; (3) modern drama and social problems. 
Associate Professor Pearce. 

19. Middle English. 1 unit. 

A study of the literature of England from the Norman Con- 
quest to the Renaissance. Particular attention will be given 
to the Fourteenth Century and to the pronunciation of Chau- 
cer. The library is well supplied with texts and translations 
from the literature of the entire period. 
Associate Professor Blount. 

20. The Bible in the Making. 1 unit. 

This course covers the history of the Bible from its sources 
in ancient lore, oral and written, through the history of the 
oldest manuscripts, to the completion of the Old Testament 
and its translation into Greek. The New Testament is taken 
up in a similar way giving the historical development of the 
Epistles and the Gospels. The course includes the history 
of the most important codices and the chief modern versions 
of the Bible. 
Associate Professor Pearce. 



108 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

21. The Short Story. 1 unit. 

A study of the history and technique of the modern short- 
story. This course will call for some library work, the reading 
of many stories, and the analysis and criticism of a limited 
number representing distinct types. There will be one or two 
critical papers. 
Associate Professor Downing. 

22. Greek Drama in English. 1 unit. 

This is a course intended to present by direct study of English 
translations the essential features of the classical backgrounds 
of modern drama, especially tragedy. The primary emphasis 
of the course will be literary — regard for the dramatic pos- 
sibilities in the local legends that furnished the materials for 
Greek tragedy, for the progress of literary skill with which 
dramatic possibilities were realized in structure and tech- 
nique, and for differences between ancient and modern tragedy. 
The study will be illuminated by a concise historical sketch of 
the Greek drama and theater; the Roman drama and theater; 
and the transmission of the Greek and Roman dramatic tra- 
ditions down to their arrival in England. Several of the trag- 
edies will be read — perhaps three in class, and others outside. 
Associate Professor Norris. 

23. Advanst Composition. 1 unit. 

This course will be based upon a study of the English familiar 
essay. It will include a study of the 17th century essay, be- 
ginning with Montaigne and Bacon; of the periodical essay 
of the 18th century; of the essay of the 19th century as it 
was developed by Lamb, Carlyle, Newman, Emerson, Ruskin, 
etc; and a brief study of contemporary essayists. It will be 
carried on by lectures, reading, and class discussions. A week- 
ly theme based upon some aspect of the work of the preceding 
work will 1)0 expected. Only students who are well grounded 
in the simple; fundamentals of composition should elect it. 
ociate Professor Downing. 

2\. Shakespearean Comedy. 1 unit. 

This course follows English 10. At least four of the come- 
dies will be read in class, — Midsummer Night's Dream, As 
You Like II, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest. 



109 



The effective teaching of Shakespeare calls for an apprecia- 
tion of his rhythm. With this in mind a short course of lec- 
tures upon versification will precede the reading of the plays 
and time will be taken in class, by oral reading, to catch the 
spirit of the comedies, and to cultivate a sensitive feeling for 
the musical flow of his verse. 

Literary Projects for the Grades. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to meet the present-day demand on 
the part of superintendents, prinicpals, and teachers in the 
primary, intermediate, and junior high school departments, 
for practice in treating large literary units as projects. Such 
story groups as the following will be studied as to (a) con- 
tent (b) division into units for teaching, (c) adaption for, 
and (d) presentation in, the various grades: 1. Hiawatha 
(background of Indian myth and Indian life); 2. Sigurd the 
Volsung (background of Norse myth, Norse life, the Vik- 
ings; 3. Kalevala (background of Finland and the frozen North) ; 
4. Iliad and Odyssey (background of Greek myths); 5. William 
Tell (Switzerland and Life on the Alps); 6. Robin Hood (days 
of ballad-making, and King Richard's England); 7. The Cid 
(Spanish background); 8. Story of Roland; 9. Arthurian Cycle; 
10. Faery Queen (background of mediaval life, knighthood, chiv- 
alry); 11. Cuchulain (Celtic Cycle); 12. Hebrew Cycle (back- 
ground of pastoral life in East). Bibliographies will be made 
by students. English 1 is presupposed and English 8 or 9 is 
highly desirable as preparation for this course. 
Associate Professor MacKenzie. 



EXPRESSION 



Professor J. Stuart Lathers. 

Associate Professor Frederick B. McKay 

Assistant Professor Ida G. Hintz 

The work of the debating clubs and the oratory and debating 
contests is done under the direction of Associate Professor McKay. 

Students specializing in this department are required to take part 
of their work in the English department. 



110 • NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

1. Teachers' Reading. 1 unit. 

The aim of this course is preparation for the teaching of reading. 
It consists of a study of the elements of vocal expression and 
the steps essential to a systematic course of reading in the 
grades, a discussion of the methods of primary and grammar . 
grade reading and of the relation of the reading work to liter- 
ature. An attempt is also made to develop the student's 
ability as a reader by the study and vocal interpretation of 
certain classic selections from literature. 

Students who have had no experience in teaching should, 
if possible, postpone this course until they have had psychol- 
ogy , and no student should elect it before the freshman year. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Professor Lathers, Associate 
Professor McKay, Assistant Professor Hintz. 

2. Elements of Elocution. 1 unit. 

This course aims to give the student a correct pronunciation 

and distinct utterance, and to bring him into greater sympathy 

with the best in literature. 

Exercises are given to secure good quality and volume of tone 

and distinctness and accuracy of articulation and enunciation. 

A study is made of the sources of power in speaking — both 

vocal and physical expression. Short classics are carefully 

studied as to their literary value and are given as declamations 

at frequent intervals during the course. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

3. Advanst Elocution. 1 unit. 

Study of vocal technique and expression thru action. This 

course aims to make a careful literary analysis of selections 

from the best literature, and, thru stimulating the thinking 

process, to make the thought and feeling dominate voice and 

action. 

Winter .Hid spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

■1. Pvblic Speaking, Elementary, 1 unit. 

Tin- i b fn i course in public speaking and is adapted to the 
need ''i those who have had little or no experience in speak- 
ing before an audience. The course opens with a study of the 
principle* and practice of parliamentary procedure intended 



EXPRESSION 111 

* 

to meet the demand for a better acquaintance with methods 
of conducting business meetings of various kinds. 
This is followed by regular programs consisting of declama- 
tions, short original talks, debates, after-dinner speeches, etc. 
One day of each week is given to lectures and discussions 
upon the principles of thought, composition, and delivery. 
Little of the work is written, the great purpose of the course 
being to learn to think upon one's feet. 
Spring term. Associate Professor McKay. 

5. Public Speaking Advanst. 1 unit. 

This is a continuation of the Elementary course, its aim being 
the development of ability in practical public speaking, fitting 
one to appear before an audience and present his ideas clearly 
and forcibly. To assist in securing good form considerable 
time at the beginning of the course is given to declamation. 
Later original speeches are made upon a great variety of topics 
popularly discust. The principles of public speaking are 
presented thru lectures, reports and a study of the speeches of 
great orators. It is of special value not only to those who 
expect to enter the oratorical contests, but to those as well who 
may have charge of similar work in high schools either as teachers 
of English or in the position of superintendent or principal. This 
course should be preceded by Expression 4 or an equivalent 
amount of work. 
Fall term. Associate Professor McKay. 

6. Argumentation and Debate. 1 unit. 

The course opens with a text-book study of the principles 
underlying argumentation, which is continued by assignments, 
lectures, and discussions one day each week thruout the term. 
This is followed by platform debates upon prominent questions 
of the day with special attention given to the logical and ef- 
fective arrangement of arguments and an easy, forceful de- 
livery. The class is divided into sections and each section is 
given opportunity to defend some proposition against other 
sections. The preparation of briefs precedes these discussions, 
with the aim of organizing the thought and discussing the 
topic more intelligently. This course is intended to develop, 
thru investigation, practice and criticism, the habit of logical, 



112 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

consecutive thinking, and commends itself, not only to those 
who wish to learn the art of thinking upon one's feet, but 
particularly to all who may have to supervise literary or de- 
bating societies in the public schools. It should be preceded 
by Expression 4 or an equivalent amount of work. 
Winter term. Associate Professor McKay. 

7. Shakespearean Reading. 1 unit. 

Study of the principles of dramatic structure, and an exam- 
ination of the plots and characters of Shakespearean drama as 
they bear upon the vocal expression of the selections. Studies 
will be made of passages from Hamlet, Macbeth, Julius Ca sar, 
Merchant of Venice, and Midsummer Night's Dream. 
Winter term. Professor Lathers. 

8. Critical Readings. 1 unit. 

An advanst course in reading intended for teachers engaged 
in high school English or for students who are doing special 
work in English or oratory. 

It consists of a study of the aesthetic and rhetorical princi- 
ples of style as related to the vocal interpretation of great lit- 
erature. The work will be based upon the study of selections 
from English and American masterpieces in prose and verse. 
Spring term. Professor Lathers. 

[). Dramatization. 1 unit. 

A st udy of the manifestations of the dramatic instinct in children 
and the educational value of dramatic performances in the 
school. The dramatization of stories suited to the various 
grades. Discussion of pageants and festivals and practice in 
stage deportment and management. 
Winter and spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

10. Oral Di cussion. 1 unit. 

The first purpose of the course is to develop thru general dis- 

ii the individual presentation of topics and accom- 
panying reading, definite ideas upon a round of related subjects, 
particularly with reference to their underlying principles. The 

I purpose is <<> develop the power to organize ideas, to 
Il\y<- them Oral expression in good English, and to defend them 
with confidence. Clear ideas and clear, convincing expression 



EXPRESSION 113 



are the objectives. Illustrative of the problems considered 
are: Does the world grow better, The purpose of man's exis- 
tence, Man at the beginning of his human career, Growing 
truth, How problems arise, The Practical versus the Ideal 
point of view, Individualism, Socialism, Social struggle, 
The Single tax. Any subject so related as to enable the student 
to see more clearly the purpose and trend of life and his place 
in it is eligible for discussion. It is not a public speaking 
course; the method is rather that of the round table. Written 
work is reduced to the minumum tho students are asked to 
keep a notebook for briefly recording the discussions. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor McKay. 

Interpretative Reading. 1 unit. 

This course is intended for students who have had consider- 
able work in reading and public speaking or English. The work 
is designed to aid students in the presentation of readings of 
some length and difficulty in fiction poetry and drama. Stu- 
dents should consult the instructor before electing this course. 
Spring term. Professor Lathers. 

Readings in Victorian Poetry. 1 unit. 

A study of the poetry of the Victorian period. Review of the 
intellectual, artistic and political movements of the period and 
their relation to the poetry. Special attention is given to the 
oral interpretation of Browning and Tennyson. 
Spring term. Professor Lathers. 

Story Telling. 1 unit. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
various types of stories — fables, folk-tales, myths, hero-stories 
and the like, and to choose those which are suited to the needs 
of the different grades. The emphasis is placed on the expres- 
sion side and after a discussion of the principles which underlie 
the art of story-telling, as much practice as possible is given to 
the actual telling of the story. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

Play Production. 1 unit. 
A study of the problems involved in staging plays in the high 
school. Specifically it will deal with the selection of suitable 
15 



114 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

plays, the principles governing staging, make-up and costum- 
ing with an examination of modern theories regarding stage 
scenery and settings. The class will have opportunity to ap- 
ply these principles in actual presentation of parts on a suitable 
stage and if casts can be made up from the class an evening 
program of short plays or one long play will be presented. 
Winter and spring terms. Professor Lathers. 

DEGREE COURSES 

Course 1 will not be credited on the work of the third or fourth 
college year. 

Students not specializing in this department may elect Courses 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 in the third or fourth college year. 



FINE ARTS 



Professor Bertha Goodison. 
Miss Lota H. Garner. Miss Lid a Clark. 

Miss Elinor Strafer. 

1. Perspective. 1 unit. 

Instruction is given in the principles of perspective and of 
light and shade. Drawings are made from type forms, still- 
life, interiors and exteriors of buildings. 

Mediums: Pencil, brush and ink, blackboard. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Miss Garner, Miss Clark, 
Miss Strafer. 

2. Nature Drawing. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

This course includes the pictorial and decorative treat- 
ment of plant and animal forms in black and white, and color. 
Mediums: Pencil, water colors, blackboard. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Miss Garner, Miss Clark, Miss 
Strafer* 

3. Commercial Design, 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, ( loUTSe 1. 

The introductory work in tin's course is the study of letter 



FINE ARTS 115 



forms, proportions, spacing; and arrangement; in connection 
with the Gothic and Roman Alphabets. Such commercial 
problems, as advertisements, trade-marks, labels, catalog 
covers, and posters are given. 
Mediums: Pencil, ink and water colors. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. 
Miss Strafer. 

5. Teachers' Drawing. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

Preparation is given for teaching art in the grades. Pro- 
gressive series of lessons in the different art subjects are planned 
and executed. The following is considered: art in relation to 
other subjects, to environment, industry, etc., also various 
methods of presenting lessons. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Goodison. 

6. Still-life Drawing and Painting. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2 or 3. 

Instruction is given in the rendering of drapery, objects, still- 
life and flowers in charcoal and water color. Some problems 
in landscape composition are introduced. 
Fall and spring terms. Miss Clark. 

7. Blackboard Drawing. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 
Offered summer term only. 

Rapid sketching on the blackboard in outline or in values 
of flowers, animals, landscapes and buildings. The aim is to 
give the teacher skill in illustrating lessons in geography, his- 
tory, nature study, etc. 
Miss Garner. 

8. Composition. 1 unit. 

Prerequisites: Three courses in Fine Arts or their equivalents. 
The work will be somewhat advanst in character, as studies 
suitable for illustration or mural decoration will be made. 
These will require the use of figures, animals, and landscapes, 
and will be executed in black and white and in color . 
Summer term only. Miss Strafer- 



116 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

9. Des-ig?i. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2, or 3. 

An appreciation of the principles of design in line, mass, 
and color. Exercises with brush and ink, charcoal, and water 
colors. Application made with wood blocks, stencils, and 
other mediums. 
Fall and spring terms — One section, 2 hours. Miss Strafer. 

10. Home Economics Design. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

The course in H. E. Design is planned to cover the decora- 
tive part of the sewing taught in the grades and in the high 
school. The theory of flower arrangement and table decora- 
tion also receive attention. 
Winter term. Miss Clark. 

11. Interior Decoration. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

This course instruction in the principles of color and design 
as related to problems of home decoration and furnishing. Such 
factors controlling house planning and furnishing as the lighting, 
size and function of rooms, and the adaptabilitjr and cost of 
materials are considered. 
Winter term. Professor Goodison. 

\2. Costume Design. 1 unit. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. 

The course in costume design includes sketching from the 
l.i v figure, and the designing of the modern costume based 
on the fund;i mental principles of design. The exercises are 
carried out thru various mediums: pencil, pen and ink and 
water color. Special attention is given to color combinations 
and to technique in the rendering of materials. 
Spring term. Miss Strafer. 

L5 and L5a. L if< Ski tch i n g . 1 unit . 

Prerequisite, ( bourses L, 2 and 0. 

'I in held two hours daily, four days in the week. 

The course includes rapid sketching for action and propor- 
tion, and the rendering of the full figure and the head in light 



GEOGRAPHY 117 

and shade. The mediums used are charcoal, chalk, and pen 

and ink. 

Winter and spring terms. Miss Clark. 

History of Architecture and Sculpture. 1 unit. 

This course is a study of the Egyptian, Grecian, Roman, 
Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Renaissance Architec- 
ture, and the sculpture of these periods. 
Fall or winter term. Miss Clark. 

History of Painting. 1 unit. 

This course includes a series of illustrated talks on the prin- 
cipal painters of different periods and countries. 
Text book — World's Painters — Hoyt. 
Fall term. Professor Goodison. 

Greek Art and Archaeology for Beginners. 

This course is open not only to classical students but also 
to students of art. The work is popular in character and 
aims to give, in a simple manner, such information in ancient 
art and architecture as every intelligent teacher should have. 
The course will be given by lectures and illustrated by the 
stereopticon. 
Spring term. 



GEOGRAPHY 



Professor Mark Jefferson. 
Miss Ora B. Wilcox 

Note. — Geography 1 is the fundamental course in the department 
and required of all students on the General Curriculum. Other courses 
in geography should be preceded by this. 

1. Teachers 1 Course. 1 unit. 

Countries are regarded as groups of men under one govern- 
ment together with the portion of the earth they have in actual 
use. The distribution of men over the earth is regarded as 
the most important item of geography, and modern conceptions 
of such things as cities and countries are here explained. Cli- 



118 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

mate figures a good deal in the course, especially in so far as 
the explanation of rainfall is concerned, for the distribution 
of rainfall over the earth enables man to live and thrive best 
in favored localities. The old-time teaching about the climates 
of the earth, for instance, has the merit of simplicity, but it is 
often the simplicity of ignorance, teaching what simply is not 
so, as that the equatorial regions are excessively hot, that 
Europe is given a mild climate by the Gulf Stream and that 
winds are cooled by snow-capped mountains. Of recent years 
abundant measurements and careful observations enable us 
to describe climates with some accuracy, and illustrate the 
chief principles that control them. Enough exercises are given 
in simple map drawing to enable the students to use maps better. 
It is believed this course gives a sound foundation both for 
elementary teaching and for further study of geography. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Professor Jefferson and Miss 
Wilcox. 

2. Field Work. Teachers' Course: 1 unit. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. 

A course in Physiography for students who are able to do 
some walking. Others should be content with 6. More than 
half the exercises are conducted in the open air. Spring term, 
2-4. Students must reserve the whole afternoon, as occasional 
excursions will last till 6 p. m. This is most important work 
for all who wish to teach geography well, since it deals with 
geography itself, not descriptions of it. It is the real labora- 
tory work of geography. 
Spring term. Professor Jefferson. 

:;. Geography of The United Stales. 1 unit. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. 

Fall and spring terms. Professor Jefferson. 

4. Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 
Prerequisite, ( lourse 1. 

\ study of culture, power, commerce and physical habitat 
of the chief European nations, with comparisons between 
t hem. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Jefferson. 



GEOGRAPHY 119 



5. Commercial Geography. 1 unit. 

This course treats of the geographic control on the produc- 
tion and exchange of such commodities as cotton, wheat, iron, 
copper, wool and manufactured articles, to develop the prin- 
ciples underlying and guiding commercial activities. Smith's 
Commerce & Industry and Jefferson's Atlas of Commercial 
Values. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Wilcox. 

6. Physiography of the Lands. 1 unit. 

Preparation for teaching Physical Geography in high schools. 
This is an advanst course in physical geography, dealing 
with the forms of the surface of the lands and the processes 
by which they take and change these forms. Davis' Physi- 
cal Geography and Practical Exercises are used as text. 
Winter term. Miss Wilcox. 

7. Map Drawing. 1 unit. 

(Even years, 1922, 1924.) 

Exercises on the theory and practice of drawing maps. 

Spring term. Professor Jefferson. 

8. Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 

(Even years, 1922, 1924.) 

Intensive* study of France. Geography 4 must precede this 

course. 

Winter term. Professor Jefferson. 

9. Meteorology. 1 unit. 

(Odd years, 1921, 1923, etc.) 

A study of weather and climate with especial attention to 

observation and explanation of the current and usual weather 

at Ypsilanti. Davis' Meteorology as text. 

Winter term. Professor Jefferson. 

10. Advanst Course on the Geography of Latin America. 1 unit. 

Intensive study of the countries south of the United States. 

Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Spring term. Professor Jefferson. 

12. Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 
(Odd years, 1921, 1923, etc.) 



120 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Intensive study of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland. Geography 4 must precede this course. 
Spring term. Professor Jefferson. 

13. Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 
(Odd years, 1921, 1923, etc.) 

Intensive studies of Mediterranean countries. Geography 4 
must precede this course. 
Winter term. Professor Jefferson. 

16. Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 
(Even years, 1922, 1924, etc.) 

Intensive study of Switzerland. Geography 4 must precede 
this course. 
Winter term. Professor Jefferson. 



HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Professor Carl E. Pray. 

Associate Professor Mary B. Putnam. 

Associate Professor Bertha G. Buell. 

Associate Professor Bessie Leach Priddy. 

Courses 10, 11 and 20 should be elected early in the course by 
specializing students, unless English History has not been taken in 
the high school, when courses 1 and 2 should be elected instead of 
lo i and 11. 



HISTORY 

1 History of England. 1 unit. 

This course is for high school graduates who have not includ 

Engliali history in their courses. 

Full term. Associate Professor Buell. 

2. Hi tot v "/ England, 1 unit. 

This course u a continuation of course 1. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Buell. 



- 



HISTORY 121 



5. History of the British Empire in the Nineteenth Century. 1 unit. 
A study in the development of democracy, in the expansion of 
empire, and in the British solution of imperial problems. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Buell. 

10. History of Greece to the Conquest by the Romans. 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned reading. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

11. History of Rome. 1 unit. 

Supplementary to Course 10. Courses 10 and 11 should be 
taken in the order named. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

12. History of Greece and Rome. 1 unit. 

For students intending to teach in intermediate grades. 

20. History of Medieval Europe, 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned library reading. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Buell. 

21. History of Modern Europe from 1500 to 1789. 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned library reading. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Buell. 

22. History of Nineteenth Century Europe. 1 unit. 

This course completes the general survey of European history 
offered in Courses 10, 11, 20 and 21. It begins with the French 
Revolution and affords discussion of the important political 
and social changes of the early part of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury. Text-book supplemented by library reading. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Buell. 

24. The World War. 1 unit. 

The place of the World War as a struggle for trade suprem- 
acy, its background of diplomatic bargain and intrigue in rela- 
tion to expansion and balance of power and the dramatic con- 
flicts caused by aspirations for national unities will be devel- 
oped. The period emphasized will He between the Congress 
of Berlin (1878) and the present. Attention will be given to 
the effects of the struggle on American history, on the de- 



122 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

velopment of international law and on the progress toward 

democracy. 

Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 

30. History for the Primary Grades. 1 unit. 

Required of all students of the Primary Curriculum. This 
course is designed especially to aid the teacher in the grades in 
the use of elementary historical material and draws from both 
European and American history and social conditions. Dis- 
cussions of social relations in family, school and community; 
research with written exposition; and the consideration of a 
tentative course of study in social relations for the primary 
grades constitute the bulk of the work. 
Given each term. Associate Professor Buell. 

Teachers' History. 1 unit. 
Required of all students of the General Curriculum and all 
those specializing in History. 

This course begins with the close of the American Revolution 
and continues thru the War of 1812. A text-book, with ref- 
erence work, lectures on history and methods, observation 
work in the grades and discussions, constitute the course. 
Given each term. Professor Pray. 

31a. Teachers' History for Junior High School. 1 unit. 

A course on the teaching of history and civics in the Junior 
High School. Attention will be given to courses of study, 
collateral reading and selection of text-books. History 31 
is a prerequisite. 

32. Advanst American History 1. 1 unit. 

Teachers' history or an equivalent is a prerequisite for this 
course. It covers the period from the close of the War of 
1X12 to the end of .Jackson's Administration. 
Each term. Professor Pray. 

33 Advansl American History 2. 1 unit. 

I hi course covers the period from the close of Jackson's ad- 
mini.-f ration thru the Civil War. 
Spring term. Professor Pray. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 123 



34. Advanst American History 3. 1 unit. 

Course 34 covers the period from 1865 to the present time. 
Fall term. Professor Pray. 

15. American Colonial Institutions. 1 unit. 
Winter term. Professor Pray. 

IB. American Colonial History. 1 unit. 

For students intending to teach in the intermediate grades. 

38. Industrial History. 1 unit. 

A text-book course in American Industrial History. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

39. Current History. 1 unit. 

A study of presnt day questions, political, economic, philan- 
thropic, etc. Written and oral reports. 
Each term. Associate Professor*Putnam. 

41. History of American Diplomacy. 1 unit. 
Spring term. Professor Pray. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



1. Sociology. 1 unit. 

This course discusses the theories of sociology. It emphasizes 
the bearing of sociological theory on education and shows how 
historical knowledge is illumined by an analysis of the 
evolution of society. Text-book, assigned readings, discussions, 
oral reports and the preparation of a thesis. 
Fall and winter terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 

2. Sociology 2. 1 unit. 

Course 2 is a study of practical sociology wherein modern 
problems and prevailing remedial efforts are inspected. Orig- 
inal investigation with properly compiled reports thereon 
forms a part of the course. A text-book, magazines of social 
exploration and social surveys are the materials on which class 
room discussions and reports are based. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 



124 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

3. Political Science. 1 unit. 

This takes the place of the course previously called Teachers' 
Civics and counts for a Teachers' Course for specializing 
students. It presupposes high school courses in American 
history and government. The elements of Political Science, 
certain present questions in government and some specially 
difficult points in our own government are studied. The course 
aims to prepare students for good citizenship and to aid them 
in their future work in training young citizens. 
Given each term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

4. Comparative Government. 1 unit. 

Special study is made of the English, French and German 
governments. Some one or two other governments of special 
interest at the time are taken up each year. The course in 
Political Science should- precede this course. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

5. Economics 1. 1 unit. 

Elementary course in Economics. Text-book and assigned 

reading. 

Given each term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

6. Economics 2. 1 unit. 

Presupposes Economics 1 of which it is a continuation. At- 
tempts to apply some of the principles of economics to the 
Btudy of present questions. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

7. Present Reconstruction Problems. 1 unit. 

A study of economic, political and social questions before us 
.it the present time, with the object of obtaining a better un- 
deretanding of problems and proposed solutions. Work will 
be done by class discussions and special reports by students 
and occasional lectures by the instructor. Such study seems 
of special interest to teachers who are in part responsible for 
clear t hinking and just action on the part of the American people. 
The course might he called a course in mental and moral "pre- 
paredness/' 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 



HOME ECONOMICS 125 



8. Social Composition and Organization. 1 unit. 

An inquiry into the development of class, caste and political 
party, with special attention to the labor movement as a world 
problem. Ideals of social service and social justice in the 
reconstruction program. Social Science 1 and 2 not required 
as a prerequisite. 
Summer term. 

DEGREE COURSES 

Students desiring third and fourth year work may select from 
courses 5, 21, 22, 24, 32, 33, 34, 35, 39, and 41 in history and any 
of the courses in the Social Sciences. 

Freshmen are not admitted to courses 21, 22, 34, 35 and 41 in 
history, and courses 1, 2, 5, and 6 in the social sciences. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



Professor Martha H. French. 

Assistant Professor Charlotte King. 

Assistant Professor Jessie Richardson. 

Miss Mary Faulkner. Miss Inez Rutherford. 

Miss Nellie Ferrin. 

See page 73, for an outline of Home Economics Curriculum. 

1. Foods and Cookery. 1 unit. 

Lectures and laboratory work. 

A study of foods in relation to source, compositions, charac- 
teristics, nutritive value, digestion, effect of heat and moisture 
at different temperatures, cost, and place in the daily diet. 
The laboratory work deals with the preparation of beverages, 
fruits, vegetables, cereals, flour mixtures, candies, eggs, milk, 
cheese dishes, meats, salads and desserts. Special emphasis 
is place upon speed, accuracy and skill in manipulation and 
the recognition of standard products. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Fall term. Freshman year. 



126 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

2. Food Economics. 1 unit. 

Lectures and laboratory work. 

Presents a study of the nutritive value of foods in relation to 
body requirement and costs; the making of dietaries; the pre- 
paration of breakfasts, luncheons, and dinners, using simple 
home service and also more formal methods, their cost bearing 
a definite relation to the family budget. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Winter term. Freshman year. 

3. Garment Making. 1 unit. 

This course includes practice in the following: the use of com- 
mercial patterns; the care and use of the sewing machine and 
its attachments; hand and machine sewing applied to simple 
garments; the repair of clothing; the elementary study of 
textile fibres and fabrics, and the hygiene and economics of 
clothing. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Spring term. Freshman year. 

4. Dressmaking. 1 unit. 

This course includes further practice in the use and adaptation 

of commercial patterns in garment construction; the planning 

and making of a wash dress, a silk waist; the renovation and 

remodeling of a woolen dress or skirt. 

Hygiene and economics of clothing are studied preparatory 

to budget making in later courses. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 3. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Fall term. Sophomore year. 

5. A utrition. 1 unit. 

Lecture, laboratory and discussion. 

I 1" course will include the study of the food requirements 
o\ the normal individual thruout infancy, childhood, adolescence, 
adull life, and old age. The chemistry and physiology of 
digestion, the energy value of food, the nutritive value of 
proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, ash constituents, and vi ta- 
in:, budied. F'ractice is given in planning dietaries 



HOME ECONOMICS 127 



for each normal period of life and also dietaries for groups of 

people and families under diverse conditions. , 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1 and 2. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Winter term. Sophomore year. 

Clothing Sociology and Tailoring. 

This course aims to give practical training in the application 
to costume of line, color harmony, light and shade, and texture. 
It will aid the student in planning, executing and choosing 
garments from the standpoint of art. Practice is given in 
using and adapting to different individuals and purposes de- 
signs from current fashion magazines. 
Materials used — pencils, ink and water colors. 

Tailoring. 
Demonstration lectures are given in methods used by tailors. 
Each student makes a coat suit in linen or other suitable ma- 
terial. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 3 and 4. 
Spring term. Sophomore year. 

Home Nursing. 1 unit. 
The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
methods for rendering first aid, and for caring for patients in 
the home where trained assistance is not possible or not neces- 
sary. General practice is given in the care of a sick room, bed- 
making, bathing a patient, bandaging, etc. Diets are studied 
and menus planned. The bathing and general care of an in- 
fant is also given attention. This course is credited by the 
Red Cross, and certified. 
Offered every term. 

Lunch Room Management. 1 unit. 

This offers an opportunity to do work in large quantity cookery. 

One hundred Training School children are served with hot 

noon-day lunches which are prepared and served within a 

specified time and at a definite cost. The food requirements of 

school children are emphasized. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 

Winter term. Junior year. 



128 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



9. Housewifery and Laundry. 1 unit. 

Discussion and laboratory. 

Housewifery is a practical course that aims to acquaint the 
student with the most effective methods as applied to house- 1 
keeping. It shows how to reduce tasks in the home and howi 
to save time, money, and energy. Each student plans, draws 
and routes a home. Household labor-saving appliances are] 
studied; repairing and renovating are done; household budgets <: 
are considered, and the homemaker's job is analyzed. 
Laundry. The principles and processes in laundry work arel 
studied. The chemistry underlying the use of soap, water, 
bluings, and various reagents is considered. Equipment, costs 
care and routing of the laundry; removal of stains and disin-s 
infecting are emphasized. Household and commercial laun-i 
dries are visited. The practical work includes the washing and 
ironing of cottons, woolens, silks and linens. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Spring term. Junior year. 

10. Child Care and Child Welfare. 1 unit. 

A comprehensive study of childhood; its problems with re 

gard to food, clothing, health, environment, home and school 

Aims to suggest possible methods for those teaching in publi< 

schools in presenting all the important phases in child develop 

ment. 

Spring term. Sophomore year. 

11. Household Management. 1 unit. 

A group of six or eight young women live in the Ellen Richard 
house for the purpose of doing practical home-making unde 
supervision. This is required of all seniors, and is opened to 
no others in the department. Each person pays for room an< 
board, and earns, by living in the house, a credit which helps t 
satisfy the demand of the Smith-Hughes law that its teacher 
shall have had experience in home-making. 
Offered each term. Senior year. 



12. Home Economics Methods. 1 unit. 

Thin course aimfl to make better teachers. It analyzes 
wbject matter of home economics on the basis of the principle 



: tJ 



T" 



HOME ECONOMICS 129 

of teaching and presents the problems of the teacher, such as 
the preparing of courses of study, the lesson plan, the organi- 
zation and equipment of a department, the relation of home 
economics to other subjects in the curriculum and* to community 
work. 
Spring term. Junior year. 

Experimental Cookery. 1 unit. 
Discussion and laboratory work. 

This course gives the student the principles of research work 
in the field of cookery thru quantitative experiments with 
various problems. The class selects a problem, and each 
student works on this individually, thus checking the results 
obtained by other members of the class, and aiding in es- 
tablishing a conclusion scientifically correct. 
Each student has an opporunity also to work on a food problem 
which she selects because of its peculiar interest to her. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Spring term. Senior year. 

Dietetics. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the application of the principles of 
human nutrition to the feeding problems of the individual and 
the group under conditions of health and of such diseases as 
are dependent upon dietetic treatment. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Fall term. Senior year. 

Cafeteria Management. 1 unit. 

This course is planned for the purpose of preparing students to 
organize and administer the business of the school cafeteria or 
lunch room. Actual planning for and preparing of the counter 
display and the serving of the foods require five laboratory 
periods each week and in addition, two periods weekly are 
devoted to discussion and lecture work. 

Home Economics Teaching. 2 units. 

Each student teaches home economics subjects in grade and 
fiigh school classes for two terms or an equivalent number of 
17 



130 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



hours. This gives an opportunity for trying out work developt 
in Home Economics 12, and also aids in familiarizing the 
students with schoolroom management. Open to senior 
students only. 
Any term. Senior year. 

18. Textiles. 1 unit. 

The primitive forms of industry in their relation to the tex- 
tile industries of today form a basis for the study of the pro- 
duction and manufacture of fabrics used in the home. Cotton, 
wool, silk, linen and other useful fibres are investigated. Phys- 
ical and chemical tests for the identification of the fibres 
are given, and their individual properties studied. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Fall term. Junior year. 
Prerequisites: High school chemistry or its equivalent, 



19. Dress Design. 1 unit. 

Practical course in dressmaking. 

This includes the application of the fundamental principles 

of costume design to the different types of personalities; the 

modeling and making of lingerie and silk dresses; costs and 

suitability of materials to individuals and purposes will be 

discussed. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 3, 4, 6, and 18. 

Winter term. Third year. 

20. Millinery. 1 unit. 

Including the making of patterns for hats from paper, the 
making of wire frames, stretching buckram and cape-net frames, 
:iiid remodelling commercial frames. Frames arc covered 
with braid, and other materials, as desired, and trimmed. Dec- 
materialfl such .'is bows, fancies and flowers are made, 
:u 'I old materials are renovated. The student makes a new 
hat, mikI remodels mm old one. 
Laboi :•< ' oo. 

I'n requi Ltee : Home Economics, 3, 1 and 6. 
Winter term. Senior y 






HOME ECONOMICS 131 



21. History of Costume. 1 unit. 

A study of Egytian, Grecian and Roman costumes and their 

bearing upon later French dress, showing how our modern 

attire is an outgrowth of these and how many of the changes 

in fashion today are based on fancies of hundreds of years 

ago. 

Spring term. Senior year. 

22. Home Economics Design. 

See Fine Arts 10. 

23. Costume Design. 

See Fine Arts 12. 

24. Home Decoration. 

See Fine Arts 11. 

25. Home Economics in the Part Time School. 1 unit. 

A study of the aim, organization and administration of part 
time schools and classes, and what home economics has to 
offer in their curricula. Types of subject matter to be pre- 
sented and its relation to types of students found in part time 
schools will be discust, and practical work developt. Special 
qualifications which teachers in these classes should have will 
be outlined, and methods for progress suggested. 

30. Home Economics Survey. 1 unit. 

This course aims to present the development and growth of the 
Home Economics Movement and its present status as affected 
by legislation, and by the larger field of work now possible 
to women. 

The work of the teacher, homemaker, and professional woman 
will be analyzed and the value of a study of Home Economics 
as related to their tasks will be shown. 
Winter term. Senior year. 

50. Planning and Serving of Meals. 1 unit. 

This* is a combination course which differs from the regular 
year's work and may be taken as an elective by students who 
are not specializing in this department. 

Discussion of the simple home service and of the more formal 
methods for serving foods . 



132 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

The meals are planned with special reference to nutritive value 
and cost. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Summer term. 

55. Home Economics for Special Students. 1 unit. 

Not open to students specializing in Home Economics. 

A course which aims to aid those teaching in rural schools, 

or in special rooms, to provide some training in food and clothing 

for their children. Half the class periods will be given to 

food study and half to the study of clothing. 

Will require a two-hour period, as laboratory work will be done. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

50. Home Economics for Special Students, limit. 

A continuation of the above course carried thru a second term. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 55. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

60. Shirtwaist Course. 1 unit. 

This is a combination course which differs from the regular 
year's work and may be taken as an elective by students who 
are not specializing in this department. 

Designing and making of simple underwear, skirts, shirtwaists 
and dresses. Commercial patterns are used. The course aims 
to give practical aid to students wishing to make plain clothing. 
Si i miner term. 

Students in the Clothing classes require no uniforms, but are ex- 
pected to wear dresses appropriate for the school room. A small 
sewing apron of white material and of plain design is worn in class. 
Sewing boxes and equipment may be purchast under the direction of 
the Department ; approximate cost of equipment, $7.00 for the course. 
The cost of materials lor articles required in the course varies with 
the student*! selection, which is subject to the supervision of the in- 
fcor. 

Students In the Pood and Cookery classes will require uniforms 
■ of white tailored shirl waist, which may be brought from 
home; an apron, cap and holder, which should be purchast under the , 
supervision of the department \p} roxiinate cost of uniform, $5.00. 






INDUSTRIAL ARTS 133 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



Assistant Professor Alice I. Boardman. 
Miss Mary E. Hatton. Miss Belle Morrison. 

For the combined curriculum in Fine Arts and Industrial Arts see 
Fine arts department. 

A fee of one dollar will be charged each term to cover expense 
of material used. 

1. Woodwork 1. 1 unit. 

This course aims to teach elementary principles of joinery 
thru nature study and projects developt in the fifth and six 
grades. 
Fall term. 

2. Woodwork 2. 1 unit. 

Problems involving duplicating of parts, broad surface planing, 
square joints and wood fastenings. These principles are 
practically worked out in projects which will be of interest to 
boys of the seventh grade. 

Discussions on subjects related to wood work, as comparison 
and treatment of different woods, care and construction of 
tools, development of industrial education. 
Spring term. 

3. Woodwork 3. 1 unit. 

Problems requiring decoration, as carving, inlaying and staining ; 

gouging and wood modeling, lapt, glued, mortise and tenon 

joints. 

Lathe work. 

Study of sources and treatment of materials. 

Identification of trees and woods. 

Fall term. 



4. Woodwork 4. 1 unit. 
Problen 
signing 
projects 



oodwork 4. 1 unit. 

Problems requiring hard wood and more difficult joints; de- 
signing and finishing simple furniture; developing original 



134 NORMAL COLLEGE~YEAR BOOK 

Outlining courses and estimating expense of installing equip- 
ment. 

Lathe work. 
Winter term. 

5. Woodwork 5. 1 unit. 

In this course a piece of furniture is designed, constructed and 
suitably finished, the requisite plans having previously been 
made in Course 7. Some attention is given to the history and 
development of " Period Furniture.' ' 
Wood staining and finishing. 
Lathe work. 
Spring term. 

6. Woodwork 6. 1 unit. 

Those who do not care to take Industrial Arts 17 may sub- 
stitute one unit of advanst wood work; furniture making, house 
construction and advanst joinery. 
Spring term. 

7. Mechanical Drawing. 1 unit. 

This course includes simple perspective, orthographic projec- 
tion, working and isometric drawings, detail and assembly 
drawings; some of the common conventions found in com- 
mercial practice and elementary furniture design principles; 
free hand sketching from objects. Special emphasis is placed on 
lettering and some attention is given to outlining courses in 
mechanical drawing for high school students. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Morrison. 

s. Mechanical Drawing. 1 unit. 

Industrial Arts 7 should precede 8. 

Thii course includes advanst problems based on the events of 
the previous course. Special attention is given to the conven- 
tion- used in commercial drawing room practice, in mechani- 
'•:<!. sheet metal, and architectural drawing. 
Spring term. Miss Morrison. 

it. Elementary Handicraft. 1 unit. 

Thil ''hum- aims to meet the needs of teachers in rural and 
ungraded schools, kindergarten] and primary departments, and 






INDUSTRIAL ARTS 135 



exceptional children. The nature of the course will be flexible 
enough to meet the requirements of the class. Many problems 
considered would be helpful to leaders of camp fire and social 
groups and summer camps. Problems requiring simple tool 
work will be developt, based on nature and farm projects. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the designing and making of toys. 
Administration Building. Room 4. Miss Boardman. 

Arts and Crafts. 1 unit. 

Pottery, both hand-built and cast, with application of design, 

glazing and firing. Simple process in jewelry making. An 

elementary course in these crafts requiring Fine Arts 9 or its 

equivalent as a prerequisite. 

Silver and stones must be purchased by the student. Fee 

of $1.00 Spring and summer term?. 

Training School Building. Room C. Miss Hatton. 

Industrial Handwork. 1 unit. 

Course 17 or its equivalent is a prerequisite. 
The purpose of this course is to give the student a knowledge 
of the projects and materials suitable for children in the pri- 
mary grades. Problems are developt in elementary book- 
binding including repairing and rebinding of boosk, in chair 
caning, and in the utilization of numerous materials in basketry. 
Considerable emphasis is given to the outlining of courses 
and the history of some of our colonial industries as related to 
the industries of the present. 
Administration Building. Room 4. Miss Boardman. 

Supplementary Handwork. 1 unit. 

This course is especially planned to meet the needs of pri- 
mary teachers. It deals with the problems which concern 
man's use of raw materials in providing food, clothing, shel- 
ter, etc. Projects in clay, paper, cardboard, and textiles are 
given, as well as others related to the various subjects of the 
grades and the observance of holidays. Study of industrial 
processes and methods of teaching form an important part 
of the course. A fee of $1.00 is required. 
Training School Building. Room C. Miss Hatton. 



136 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

19. Jewelry. 

Instruction will be given in the making of brooches, pendants, 

chains, etc. The setting of stones, saw-piercing, repousse, 

enameling, casting, soldering, and finishing processes, will be 

taught. Industrial Arts 15 and Fine Arts 9, or its equivalent, 

is required. 

The cost of silver and stones must be met by the student. 

The fee of $1.00 covers use of equipment and cost of incidental 

materials. 

Training School Building. Room C. Miss Hatton. 

20. Pottery. 1 unit, 

More advanced work in coiled and built shapes and slipcasting. 
Incised, relief, inlaid, and glazed decorating. The composition 
of glazes and operation of a kiln are taught. Fine Arts 9 
(Design) and Industrial Arts 15 are prerequisites. A fee of 
SI. 00 is required. 

Laboratory hour additional. Training School Building. Room 
C. Miss Hatton. 

25. Printing. No credit. 

The aim of this course is primarily to familiarize students 
with printing as taught in junior and senior high schools. The 
major benefits are obtained in the correlation of printing with 
general English subjects. Practical work will be required 
daily in the print ship. 
Administration Building. Room 9. Miss Morrison. 

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 

Prescribed subjects for students majoring in Industrial Arts or 

Industrial and Fine Arts. 
Prescribed ( rroup: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Six Teachers ( lourses. 

Grade Teaching (1 unit). 

Teaching Special Subject (1 unit ). 
Industrial \iti Prescribed Group and Groups I, [J, and III. 
Industrial and Fine Arts Prescribed Group and Groups, r, II, 
and IV: 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 137 

I. Industrial Arts 1, 2, 15, *16, 17, English 1. 

II. Fine Arts 1, 2, or 3, 5, 9, Industrial Arts 7. 

III. Industrial Arts 3, 4, 5. 

IV. Fine Arts 6, 15, 16, 17. 

Only three terms of physical training are required of students 
taking the above courses. 

Industrial Arts 6 may be substituted for Industrial Arts 17. 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY 

1. Kindergarten-Primary Curriculum. 1 unit. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a thoro under- 
standing of the dominant characteristics, experiences, and 
needs of the child from four to eight years of age, and the 
environmental conditions best adapted to complete develop- 
ment. It will include the theory of plays and games char- 
acteristic of these ages. Supervised observation in the kin- 
dergarten and primary .grades will be made with particular 
reference to individual characteristics and differences, interests 
and responses to various stimuli. 
Miss Adams, Miss Watson, Miss Paine. 

2. Kindergarten-Primary Curriculum. 1 unit. 

This course will be a continuation of Kindergarten-Primary 
Curriculum 1. It will be devoted to a study of the subject 
matter best suited to children from four to eight years of age. 
Emphasis will be laid on the subject matter, theory and method 
best suited in presenting this material to the children of kinder- 
garten age. 

Supervised observation of type lessons will be made with par- 
ticular reference to the evaluation and organization of activities 
in kindergarten and primary grades. 
Miss Adams, Miss Watson, Miss Paine. 



Teacher's Course for students specializing in Industrial Arts. 



138 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



LATIN 



Professor Benjamin L. D'Ooge. 
Associate Professor Orland O. Norris. 
*Miss Clara Janet Allison. 
Miss Christabel Sawyer. 

1. Beginners 1 Latin. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Miss Sawyer. 

2. Beginners' Latin. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Miss Sawyer. 

3. Beginners' Latin. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Miss Sawyer. 

Courses 1-3 are preparatory to all that follow, and are 
credited as follows: 

(a) Students who have had no Latin may begin it here, 
and their work will be credited on the electives of their Nor- 
mal Course. 

(b) Students who have taken the first year of Latin in ad- 
dition to the high school work required for entrance will 
receive no advanst credits for the same unless it be followed 
by a second year here. 

Students who wish to specialize in Latin are urged to 
take as much as possible before coming to this institution. 

1. Second Year Latin and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 
Fall term. Miss Sawyer. 

5, Caesar and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Miss Sawyer. 

6. Caesar and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Miss Sawyer. 

;. Cicero and Latin Composition* 1 unit. 
Fall term. Miss Sawyer. 

8. Cicero and Latin Composition, I unit. 

\\ 'inw r tea iii. Miss Sawyer. 



:it on leave. 



LATIN 139 

9. Ovid j Metamorphoses. 1 unit. 
Spring term. Miss Sawyer. 

10. Ovid, Metamorphoses. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

11. Vergil, Aeneid. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Professor D'Loge. 

12. Vergil, Aeneid. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Norris. 

13. Livy and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Associate Professor Norris. 

14. Cicero's De Amicitia and De Senectute. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Associate Professor Norris. 

15. Latin Selections and Roman Literature, lunit. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Norris. 

16. Horace, Satires and Epistles, lunit. 

Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

17. Horace, Odes. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

18. Latin Comedy and Roman Private Life. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

19. Latin Writing. 1. 1 unit. 

This course is open to such only as have had at least four years 
of the language. It is designed to meet the needs of those 
who look forward to teaching Latin, and combines drill in the 
translation of connected English into idiomatic Latin with a 
thoro review of syntax. 
Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

20. Latin Sight Reading. (2 recitations per week, V2 unit.) 

This course is open to such only as have had at least three 
years of Latin. It affords systematic drill in the building of 
a vocabulary, and in the principles underlying the structure 



140 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






of the Latin sentence, so that the peculiarities of order may 
become thoroly familiar and progress in reading be easier 
and more rapid. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

21. Teachers 1 Course in Caesar, Cicero and Vergil. 1 unit. 

This course is required of all who expect to teach Latin and is 
open to such only as have had at least five years of the language. 
The lectures present: (1) a brief history of the Latin language 
and its relation to other languages; (2) the justification of 
Latin in the secondary school; (3) problems and methods of 
teaching secondary Latin; (4) pronunciation, quantity, prosody; 
(5) a general bibliography and a consideration of the best 
text-books; (6) ancient books and the general principles of 
textual criticism. Students who are specializing may take 
this course as one of the required teachers' courses. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

22. Historical Latin Grammar. (2 recitations per week V2 unit.) 

Course 22 is open only to those who have had at least five 

years of Latin. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

23. Latin Writing 2. (2 recitations per week, V2 unit.) 

Course 23 is an advanst course and presupposes a credit 
in Latin Writing 1. While the latter has most to do with 
mat tors of syntax, the former is devoted to a study of style 
and diction. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

24. Latin Inscriptions. (2 recitations per week, J^ unit.) 

Course 24 is an advanst course, is conducted as a seminar, 
and is open only to ten students; it may be elected only by 
such as obtain special permission from the head of the depart- 
ment. 
Spun- term. Professor D'Ooge. 

'-'•">. ' 1 ciUan lh putdlions, I unit. 

'I he hour for this class will be determined at the time the class 

1 '•! ganizi d. 

Fall U mi. Professor D'Ooge. 



LATIN 141 

Roman Political Institutions. 1 unit. 
This course should bo taken by all who are specializing in 
Latin and History. It should be preceded by a course in 
Roman History. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

Teachers' Review of Latin Grammar. 1 unit. 

This course should be taken by all who expect to teach Latin, 
and will be counted as one of the six required teachers' courses. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

COURSE IN GREEK ART 

Greek Art and Archaeology for Beginners. 1 unit. 

This course is open not only to classical and art students 
but also to students on the general curriculum. The work is 
popular in character and aims to give, in a simple manner, such 
information in ancient art and architecture as every intelli- 
gent teacher should have. The course will be given by lec- 
tures and illustrated by the stereopticon. 
Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

ANCIENT TRAGEDY FOR ENGLISH READERS 

Greek Drama in English. 1 unit. 

This is a course intended to present by direct study of Eng- 
lish translations the essential features of the classical back- 
grounds of modern drama, especially tragedy. The primary 
emphasis of the course will be literary — regard for the dra- 
matic possibilities in the local legends that furnished the ma- 
terials of Greek tragedy, for the progress of literary skill with 
which dramatic possibilities were realized in structure and 
technique, and for differences between ancient and modern 
tragedy. The study will be illuminated by a concise historical 
sketch of the Greek drama and theater; the Roman drama and 
theater; and the transmission of the Greek and Roman dramatic 
traditions down to their arrival in England. Several of the 
tragedies will be read — some in class, and others outside. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Norris. 



142 NORMAL COLLEGE jYEAR BOOK 

31. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. 1 unit. 

The hours for this class will be determined at the time the 

class is organized. 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

32. Catullus, Tibulus, and Propertius. 1 unit. 

The hours for this class will be determined at the time the 

class is organized. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

33. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. (2 lectures per 

week. Yz unit.) 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

COURSE IN MYTHOLOGY 

1. Mythology. 1 unit. 

The course in Mythology is open not only to students of this 
department, but is specially designed to acquaint the non- 
classical student with the general field of classical, especially 
Greek, mythology. The poet's and artist's use of the classic 
myths is made the basis of selection for study. In recognition 
of the large place that modern educational theory assigns to 
the myth in elementary education, considerable attention is 
given to laying a sound basis for its use in the educative process. 
Readings, recitations, and discussions. 
Each term. Associate Professor Norris. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

Students preparing themselves for teaching Latin are given un- 
USUal advantages for practice teaching in the seventh, eighth, ninth 
and tenth grades of the Training Department under the supervision 
of a trained specialist. 

LIBRARY AND ILLUSTRATIVE MATERIAL 

'J be department baa a well-equipt classical library of more iliun 
B thousand volumes, representing standard authorities in English, 
French and German. Large accessions to this collection are being 
made year by year, and the facilities of this nature are ample for all our 



MATHEMATICS 143 

purposes of study and investigation. Strong emphasis is laid upon 
collateral reading in connection with all classical authors. The de- 
partment is also well supplied with maps, charts, and photographs, of 
which constant use is made, and additional illustrative material has 
recently been provided in the shape of a large collection of lantern 
slides. 



MATHEMATICS 



Professor Elmer A. Lyman. 

Associate Professor R. A. Wells. 

Associate Professor Ada A. Norton. 

Associate Professor Jane Matteson. 

Assistant Inez Selesky. 

1. Preparatory Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

A comprehensive review in the fundamental parts of Arith- 
metic. The aim of this course is to secure rapidity and accu- 
racy in computing. 
Fall and winter terms. Associate Professor Norton. 

2. Algebra 1. 1 unit. 

Elementary algebra thru the fundamental operations. 
Fall and spring terms. Miss Selesky. 

3. Algebra 2. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Algebra 1 including factoring and fractions. 
Fall and winter terms. Miss Selesky. 

4. Algebra 3. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Algebra 1 and 2 to simultaneous equa- 
tions. 
Winter and spring terms. Miss Selesky. 

5. Algebra 4. 1 unit. 

This includes near quadratic simultaneous equations. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Matteson. 

6. Algebra 5. 1 unit. 

Completes high school algebra and furnishes a complete re- 
view of elementary algebra. Associate Professor Matteson. 



144 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

7. Plane Geometry 1. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in plane geometry including rectilinear 
figures. 

Fall, spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Matte- 
son and Miss Selesky. 

8. Plane Geometry 2. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Course 6. 

Fall, winter and summer terms. Associate Professor Matte- 
son and Miss Selesky. 

9. Plane Geometry 3. 1 unit. 

Associate Professor Matteson. 

10. Solid Geometry. 1 unit. 

Associate Professor Matteson. 

11. Teachers 1 Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

This course is carried on partly by lectures on the history 
and pedagogy of the subject, and partly by a review of the 
typical parts of the subject. This course must be preceded 
by all of the high school courses given above. 
Offered each term. Professor Lyman, Associate Professor 
Wells, Associate Professor Matteson. 

12. Methods in Geometry. 1 unit. 

A review of plane and solid geometry. Special attention will 
be paid to the methods and presentation of the subject. 
Winter, spring and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 

13. History of Mathematics. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to show the student how the subjects 
he is to teach have developt. Students have access to the 
large collection of books in the library. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Norton. 

11. Trigonometry, 1 unit. 

An elementary course in plane and spherical trigonometry. 
Presupposes all high school courses. 

Each term. Associate Professor Norton and Associate Pro- 
or Matteson. 



LATIN 145 

15. Higher Algebra 1. 1 unit. 

Besides giving a more comprehensive view of elementary 
algebra than could be given in Courses 2, 3, 4, 5, a comprehen- 
sive study is made of the idea of a function, the remainder 
theorem, symmetry, variation, the progressions, determinants, 
and the graph. Presupposes all the high school courses. 
Each term. Associate Professor Norton. 

10. Higher Algebra 2. 1 unit. 

An advanst college course, including additional work on the 

theory of the equation. 

Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Erickson. 

17. Analytical Geometry. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in analytical geometry. Presupposes 
all the previous courses except 10, 11, and 12. 
Fall and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 

18. Differential Calculus. 1 unit. 

Presupposes Course 17. 

Winter term. Professor Lyman. 

19. Integral Calculus. 1 unit. 

Presupposes Course 18. 

Spring term. Professor Lyman. 

20. Theory of Equations. 1 unit. 

This course presupposes Courses 14, 15 and 16. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Erickson. 

21. Solid Analytical Geometry. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in solid analytical geometry. Presup- 
poses all the above courses except 11, 12, 13 and 20. 
Professor Lyman. 

22. Differential Equations. 1 unit. 

Professor Lyman. 

23. Theoretical Mechanics. 1 unit. 

Professor Lyman. 

24. Mathematical Reading. 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Professor Lyman. 
19 



146 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

25. Surveying. 1 unit- 

Spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Erickson. 

26. Studies in Mathematical Education. • 1 unit. 

It is the object of this course to consider a study of the teaching 

of mathematics from an historical and psychological point of 

view. 

Spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Matteson. 

27. The Mathematical Theory of Investment. 1 unit. 

This course presupposes a good working knowledge of algebra. 
The application of the fundamental principles of mathematics 
to the treatment of interest and its bearing on the business of 
Banking Institutions, Building and Loan Associations, Sinking 
Funds, Bond Investments, Life Annuities Insurance, etc., will 
be considered. 
Winter, spring and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 

28. Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. 1 unit. 

An elementary course including a brief consideration of graph- 
ical representations, frequency curves, averages, measures of 
dispersion, and the coefficient of correlation with special refer- 
ence to educational statistics. This course presupposes a thoro 
knowledge of Algebra. 
Assistant Professor Matteson. 

29. The Teaching of Elementary Mathematics. Yz unit. 

This course is devoted mainly to the teaching of arithmetic. 
The following topics are considered: Aim of arithmetic teaching; 
the history of methods in arithmetic; the results of scientific 
studies of problems in the teaching of arithmetic; the theory and 
use of various tests and measurements in arithmetic; the course 
of study; methods of presenting various topics, etc. 
Course 1 1 must precede this course. 
A sociate Professor Wells. 

lor those desiring three years of work combining mathe- 
matical and physical sciences, the following courses are sug- 
gested: 



MODERN LANGUAGES 147 



Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 20 and 25 Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4 

English 1 German or French, 2 yrs. 

Geography 2 Teaching 

Physics 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10 Mathematics 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 

Astronomy 1 18, 19, and 25 

DEGREE COURSES 

Mathematics 1-10 will not be credited on the work of the third 
or fourth college year. 

Students who are specializing in this department may elect Courses 
20 to 27 inclusive for the third or fourth college year. 

Students who are not specializing in this department may elect 
from Courses 12-27 inclusive for college work. 

The course in Mathematical Reading (24), is distinctly a fourth 
year course. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



Professor Richard Clyde Ford. 

Associate Professor Johanna Alpermann. 

Assistant Professor Florence Lyon. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The library of the department comprises about 1,000 volumes, 
besides a number of the leading pedagogical and literary journals 
of both languages, which are on file in the reading room of the College. 

From time to time thruout the year informal lectures are given 
to students of the department on subjects relating to the politics, 
geography, history and literary life of modern Europe. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

Students of the department will have opportunity to do their 
teaching in the classes of the High School, in the seventh and eighth 
grades of the Training School, and frequently in some beginning College 
3lass. 



148 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



SCHOLARSHIP 

In 1905 a gift of the Hon. Peter White, of Marquette, now de- 
ceast, made .it possible for the department to award $25 annually 
for five years to some student of merit in French. The sum first 
became available in 1905, and was awarded to Miss Elizabeth Beal 
Steere, of Ann Arbor. In 1906 the scholarship was divided between 
Miss Vida Billings and her sister, Miss Daisy Billings; in 1907 it was 
awarded to Miss Jean McKay; in 1908 to Miss Claribel Glass and Miss 
Nelle Warwick; in 1909 no award; 1910 to Miss Josephine Sherzer 
and Miss Fanny B. Berry. 

For five years (from 1911) the fund is continued as a memorial 
scholarship by Mr. White's heirs. In 1911, 1912, there was no award; 
in 1913 the scholarship was divided between Miss Ruth Williams and 
Miss Crystal Worner; in 1914 it was awarded to Miss Ernestine Burton; 
in 1915 to Miss Mildred Jessup and Mr. Harold Rieder; in 1916 and 
1917, no award. Since 1918 awards have been resumed. 

DEGREE COURSES 

Candidates for a degree, and specializing in this department, may 
elect courses French — 4 to 14; German — 10 to 21; Spanish — 1 to 7 
for the third or fourth college year. 

Candidates not specializing, may elect anywhere according to 
requirements of their preparation. 

( ; EN ERAL COURSES— 

Modern European Literature 1, 2, 3. 

Three half courses. 1 Russia, 2 Scandinavia and Central, 
Europe, 3 France and Spain. 

These courses which are altogether in English are open to 
students of all departments. The courses are frequently 
varied Id order and arrangement, but one may be expected 
from the department each year. 

MODERN LANGUAGE TEACHERS COURSE— 

(Moo. Lang. 42.) 

A course devoted to the history, theory and pedagogy of mode™ 
languages teaching. Review of phonetics. 
Spring term. Miss Alpermann. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 149 



FRENCH 



FIRST YEAR:— For Beginners. 3 units. 

t, 2, 3. A beginning course in the language, running thruout the 
year; several sections. Professor Ford, Miss Alpermann, Miss 
Lyon. 

In this year particular attention is paid to pronunciation 
and the elementary principles of grammar and colloquial 
expression. Two hundred pages of matter are read, chosen 
from such texts as Smith and Greenleaf's French Reader, Bruno's 
Le Tour de la France, Halevy's V Abbe Constantin, De Tocque- 
ville's Voyage en Amerique. 

SECOND YEAR:— 3 units. 

\l, 5, 6. Review of grammar, written work and conversation; thruout 
the year. 

The reading of this year is taken from such texts as Dumas' 
L' Evasion du due de Beaufort, Merimeee Colomba, About's 
Le Roi des Montagues, easy plays, etc., supplemented with 
sight reading from modern writers, and outside matter in 
English 

SENIOR COURSES— 

r. First 125 ages of Duval's Histoire de la Litterature Francaise; 
Moliere's Les Femmes Savantes; Corneille's Polyeucte; Racine's 
Esther. 
Fall term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

Duval's Histoire, etc. Pages 125-246. Letters of Madame de 
Sevigne; Voltaire's Prose. Winter term. Professor Ford. 
1 unit. 

Duval's Histoire de la Litterature Francaise concluded. Lamartine's 
Scenes de la Revolution Francaise; Hugo's Hernani; Hugo's Les 
Miserables; Musset's Comedies. 
Spring term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

The year's work as outlined in the preceding courses is 
planned to give the student a systematic review of French 
literature since the 16th century. The main periods and au- 



150 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

thors are carefully outlined and studied, and the literary cur- 
rents setting into the subsequent centuries are followed up. 

10, 11, (42). 3 units. 

These courses are designed to bring together in the depart- 
ment all senior students who wish to qualify in any way to 
teach French. The work as planned in 10 and 11 will include 
a review of French grammar, with attention to historical origins, 
a supplementary drill in formal composition, and practice 
in spoken French. In the spring term the class merges naturally 
into French 42 which is devoted to the history, theory, and 
pedagogy (phonetics) of Modern Language ' teaching. Fre- 
quently courses 10 and 11 will alternate with the work designated 
in French 7, 8, 9. 

12, 13. 1 unit. 

Courses in scientific French. Two hours a week. 
Winter and spring terms. 



SPANISH 



During the last five years Spanish has achieved a prominent place 
in our schools and colleges. This growth of interest is due in part 
to the growth of trade with Latin-American countries, through which 
has come a demand for interpreters, salesmen and government officials 
with a knowledge of Spanish; in part to the development of industries 
in Spanish-speaking countries which furnish opportunities to civil, 
electrical and mining engineers. And then again, the 50,000,000 
Latin-Americans are beginning to develop a literature of great interest. 
The literature of Spain itself contains many of the world's master- 
pieces m poetry and drama. Concerning the Spanish novel William 
Dean I low (lis says: "Take the instance of a solidified nationality, 
take the Spanish and you have first-class modern fiction, easily sur- 
ing the fiction of any of the people of our time." 

The importance of instruction in Spanish has so rapidly gained 
wide recognition thai thi demi ad for teachers exceeds the supply. The 
field i- .'«n attractive one l< r prospective language teachers. 
3 units. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 151 



A beginning course in the language, running thruout the year. 

Pronunciation, grammar, reading, enlivened by composition 

and conversation. 

From 200-300 pages are read from such texts as Hill's Spanish 

Tales, Alarcon's Novelas Cortas, Valera's El Pdjaro Verde, 

and Spanish- American readers and newspapers. 

Two sections. Miss Lyon. 

Advanced Spanish 

4, 5, 6. 3 units. 

Review of grammar, written work and conversation. 

The reading of this year is selected from Spanish-American 
books and magazines, and Spanish novels and dramas of the 19th cen- 
tury. These texts are typical: Tres Comedias Modernas, Alarcon's 
El Capitdn Veneno, Galdo's Marianela, Dona Perfecta, etc., etc. These 
courses in advanced Spanish cover two or three years of work. Miss 
Lyon. 



GERMAN 



The courses as outlined below are illustrative of what was given 
in the department before the revulsion of feeling for things German 
in this country banished from many of our schools a desire to continue 
longer the German language and literature. Whenever conditions 
and a demand warrant it, the department will be glad to help in a new 
appreciation of a new and better Germany, for undoubtedly there is 
much that is valuable in the art, science and literature of German as an 
important modern language. 

FIRST YEAR:— For Beginners. 3 units. 

1, 2, 3. This is a course for beginners in the language and runs thruout 
the year. 

The work of this year is intended to give the student a good 
pronunciation and make him acquainted with the elements of 
the grammar and colloquial expression. (Grammar, — Thom- 
as, or some beginning book). The amount of matter read will 
apprpximate 250 pages and will be chosen from beginning 
readers «and easy stories. 



152 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

The work is preparatory and treated as follows : 
Beginning ivork thruout one year, if taken in addition to the 
high school work required for entrance, will be credited ONLY 
WHEN FOLLOWED BY AN ADDITIONAL YEAR HERE. 

4, 5, 6. The work extends thruout the year. 

In this year the student is introduced to real literature as 
such, and a constant endeavor is made to cultivate a literary 
appreciation of the authors studied. At the same time work 
in grammar and composition is reviewed and emphasized in 
order to fix thoroly in the learner's mind the structural fea- 
tures of the language. 

The following texts may be regarded as typical: Seidel's 
Leberecht Huhnchen, Thiergen's Am Deutschen Herdc, Chamisso's 
Peter Schlemihl. 

SENIOR COURSES— 

7. Study of representative prose; composition and review of grammar. 

Fall term. 1 unit. 

8. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea; written 

work. Winter term. 1 unit. 

9. Lyrics and ballads. Outline history of German literature. 

Spring term. 1 unit. 

The work in these courses is a continuation, both in spirit 
and treatment, of the preceding. Conversation is encouraged 
and there is a systematic review of grammar; nevertheless 
the chief emphasis of instruction is laid upon extensive read- 
ing, with an attempt to determine some of the main currents 
in German literature. 

Literature of the xix Century. 

10. Study of fiction based on such examples as Scheffel's Ekkchard; 

Sudermann's Frau Sorge; Frenssen's J dm Uhl; prose com- 
position. Fall term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

11. Study of modern drama Sudennann, llauptmann, Wilden- 

bruch; prose composition. Winter term. Professor Ford. 

1 unit . 

I _' Poetry of the L9th century. Spring term. Professor Ford. 

l unit, 
13 German Literature of the Last twenty-five years. — lnvcstiga- 



MODERN LANGUAGES \ 53 



tion of the main currents of the literature of the present day 
Magazines and special authors. This course will alternate 
with Course 12 as a seminar course. 1 unit. 
A suitable Litter aturgeschichte will be used as an outline in the 
work of this year, illustrated by texts, which will be studied 
in class. Each student will also be expected to make himself 
familiar with some special author whom he will read and report 
upon. 

SEMINAR COURSES- 
CLASSICAL Literature. 

14. Study of Lessing; history of German literature from the time 

of Luther. Fall term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

15. Goethe; German literature continued. Winter term. Professor 

Ford. 1 unit. 

16. Schiller and his plays; research work and outside reading. 
Spring term. Professor Ford. 

Historical Development of Language and 
Literature. 
7, 18, 19. 3 units. 

A study of the development of the language and grammar 
Fall and Winter, devoted to Middle High German; Spring 
the period from 1300 to 1800, 10-11. Professor Ford. 
A systematic review of the History of German literature 
from the beginning to the present time. Selections from writ- 
ers, ancient and modern. This course will frequently replace 
14, 15, 16. 

-0, 21. Scientific German. 1 unit. 

A course of two hours a week thruout the Winter and Spring 
terms, open to students of science, who have had the regular 
preparation of High School German. This course will alternate 
with Scientific French (French 13, 14). Professor Ford. 



154 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



MUSIC 

Professor Frederick Alexander. 

Assistant Professor Clyde E. Foster. 

Mr. Walter Leary. 

Miss Neva Greene. Miss Ellatheda Spofford. 

Mr. Harold L. Rieder. Mr. Russell L. Gee. 

For outline of special curriculum in Music see page 83. 

1. Elements of Music 1. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors of Music in Public Schools. The course 
discusses the development of musical theory, elements of no- 
tation, ear training and phrase writing, time sub-divisions, 
scale and interval singing, and sight reading. 
Fall term. Miss Greene. 

2. Elements of Music 2. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors. Must be preceded by Music 1. Ad- 
vanst forms of melody and rhythm, chromatics, minors, modu- 
lations and part-singing in combination with work of the pre- 
ceding course. 
Winter term. Miss Greene. 

3. Advanst Sight Reading. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors. Must be preceded by Music 1 and 2. 
The course aims to develop fluency and rapidity in music 
reading of the various voices in different clefs. Advanst part- 
sinking as a preparation for chorus conducting, interpretation 
and analysis. 
Spring term. Miss Greene. 

1. Elements of Music. 1 unit. 

This course is required for nil college students who are pr9 
paring to tench in grades below the high school. It must 
be followed, however, by Music le, reciting two times per 
Week for one term, for which no credit is given. 

The course prepares the grade teacher to give music in- 
struct ion in tin; various grades and offers practical work in 



music * 155 

sight reading. Methods of presenting music are emphasized 

in Course 4e. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Green, Mr. Gee, Miss 

Spofford. 

5. Primary Music Methods. 1 unit. 

It aims to consider the subject of primary music teaching 
under the following topics with emphasis upon suggestive 
methods of presentation: child voice — its protection and de- 
velopment; training of monotones; rote songs and how to 
teach them; the observation song — its purpose; melodic and 
rhythmic development; notation through the song; music 
reading. A sequence of songs for the year, correlated with 
the seasons, is memorized. Some ability in piano playing 
is required as an aid in development of rhythm. 
For college students who have past Music 4, all terms. For 
supervisors, winter term only. Assistant Professor Foster 
and Miss Greene. 

6. Grammar Music Methods. 1 unit. 

Supervisors only. A continuation of Music 5 and must 
be preceded by it. The work includes tone production and 
voice development in grammar grades; song interpretation; 
advanst work in melody and rhythm with emphasis upon the 
basic principles involved. 
Spring term. Assistant Professor Foster. 

7. Grammar Music Methods. 1 unit. 

For college students who have past Music 4 and 4c, or an 
equivalent. Work similar to Music 6. 
Summer term only. Assistant Professor Foster. 

Methods in High School Music and Conducting. 1 unit. 

Devoted largely to theory and professional work for advanst 
or high school grades. It is a continuation of Music 5 and 6 
which must precede it. 
Spring term. Professor Alexander. 

). Department Teaching. 2 units. 

Required in Public School Music and Music Drawing courses. 
Teaching done under Assistant Professor Foster's supervision. 



156 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

11-13. History and Literature of Music. 3 units. 

A course giving an outline of music and musicians, with a 
course of reading relating to musical literature. Text-book: 
History of Music by Waldo Selden Pratt. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Professor Alexander. 

Ear Training. 

The first two years of Ear Training alternate with Harmony 
and the third year with Musical Composition and must be 
taken to receive full credit in these subjects. First year (covered 
by Music 14-16) : The recognition and writing of all major and 
minor intervals; the augmented fourth and diminisht fifth; the 
recognition and writing of all triads and the dominant-seventh 
chord with inversions. Second year: Harmonic dictation 
including all triads, incomplete dominant-seventh and ninth 
and some secondary seventh chords with inversions. Modu- 
lation. Third year: Recognition of all diatonic and chromatic 
intervals, altered and mixt chords in both major and minor 
modes. 

14. Harmony 1 and Ear Training la. 1 unit. 

Major and minor scales; intervals. Principal triads in 
major and minor modes, and connecting of same. 
I all and summer terms. Mr. Rieder. 

L5. Harmony 2 and Ear Training 16. 1 unit. 

Subordinate triads in major and minor modes. Inversions. 
Five — seven with inversions and resolutions and practical use 
of these chords. 

Winter term. Mr. Rieder. 

L6. Harmony '•'> and Ear Training \c. 1 unit. 

All other seventh chords. Five— nine and incomplete five — 

< n and five nine. Diminisht seventh in minor. 

Spring term. Mr. Rieder. 

17. Harmony 1 and Ear Training 2a. 1 unit. 

Direct modulations. Altered and mixt chords in major and 

minor modes. 

Fall term. Mr. Rieder. 



music 157 

18. Harmony 5 and Ear Training 2b. 1 unit. 

Extraneous modulation. Special treatment of diminisht and 
dominant seventh chords in both modes. Inharmonic tones. 
Winter term. Mr. Rieder. 

19. Harmony 6 and Ear Training 2c. 1 unit. 

Inharmonic tone continued. Harmonization of embellished 
melodies and figured basses. Analysis. 
Spring term. Mr. Rieder. 

Musical Composition. 

Form and analysis with original work. This course re- 
quires one year's work and comprises the following: The 
simple phrase; period; double periods; two, three and five 
part song forms. Much attention is given to the analytic side, 
constant reference being made to the works of Beethoven, 
Mozart, Haydn, Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Chopin, 
Brahms and others. 

20-22. Musical Form. 3 units. 

A study of the evolution of musical forms, the principles of 
the homophonic and polyphonic styles of composition, and 
the method of their application, presented through a com- 
prehensive study of masterpieces for voice, solo instruments, 
and various ensemble groups. 
All terms. Mr. Gee. 

23-25. Counterpoint. 3 units. 

This course requires one year's work and covers the following: 
The conduct of the single melodic part; various modes of 
imitation; the invention forms; chorale-figuration; fugue and 
canon. The work alternates with Advanced Ear Training. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Mr! Gee. 

|26. Voice Culture. 1 unit. 

Lectures on the physical basis of tone production; exercise 
for the development of the voice; study of a limited reper- 
tory of songs. This course is open to all college students 
and required of all specializing in Public School Music. Two 
hours a week for three terms required for credit in this course. 
All terms. Mr. Leary. • 



158 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

27. Class in Artistic Singing. 

A study of the interpretation of masterpieces. Meets twice 

a week. For advanst pupils only. 

Fall and winter terms. Professor Alexander. 

29. Normal Choir. 1 unit. 

Required of all Conservatory Students. Open to all college 

students who qualify. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays. All terms. Professor Alexander. 

Credits. 

Voice Culture and Teachers' Music will not be credited in the 
third or fourth college year. 

Students who are specializing in music may elect courses in Counter- 
point, Music Composition, History of Music, Piano, Organ, and Har- 
mony for the third or fourth college year. 

DEGREE COURSES 

The following courses count toward a degree: 
Harmony: Music 14-19. 
Counterpoint: Music 23-25. 
Double Counterpoint, Fugue and Composition or Piano, Organ 
or Violin, three years each. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 

Professor William H. Sherzer. 

Associate Professor Jessie Phelps. 

Associate Professors Mary A. Goddard, Bertram G. Smith and 

J. Milton Hover. 

Student Assistants — Mary A. Long, Martha S. Best. 

A i i wi in Physiology and Hygiene * Caroline A. Supe. 

Curator — Charles C. F^dwards. 

Florist and Gardener — R. A. Henstock. 

The class-rooms, laboratories and collections of the department 
occupy the wesi half of S< ien< e Hall. The laboratory and field courses 
in physiology, biology, zoology, botany, agriculture and geology re- 
quire two hours daily, but into those two periods is intended to be 



I 



NATURAL SCIENCES 159 



brought all the work of the class, including preparation of notes, li- 
brary assignments, reviewing for quizzes, etc. In certain indicated 
subjects these two periods must be consecutive. In the other labora- 
tory classes it is very desirable that the hour preceding, or imme- 
diately following the class hour, be left open, and this should be done 
whenever the schedule will possibly permit. Students seeking elec- 
tives in the department are urged to make their selection early in the 
year and then note the term or terms in which these subjects are offered. 
Those upon the general course are notified that their electives may be 
selected from any of the six lines; nature study, biology, geology, 
zoology, botany, agriculture or physiology. The particular course 
that it is desirable to elect will depend upon the preparation and pros- 
pective work of the student. The various instructors will be glad 
to give advice relative to the selection of courses. 

*Also visiting nurse with salary paid by the Interdepartmental 
Social Hygiene Board, Washington, D. C. 



AGRICULTURE 



The courses offered in agriculture are designed to meet a variety 
of needs, as follows: 

1. Courses for students specializing in Rural Education. Such 
students should take Agriculture 1, and, if possible, also elect courses 
5 and 8. 

2. Electives for students in the General Life Certificate Curric- 
ulum. Courses 1, 5 and 7 are recommended for such students. 

3. Courses for students majoring or minoring in Natural Sci- 
ences. Courses 2, 3 and 4 are recommended. These three courses 
constitute a year's work in agriculture and deal especially with the 
scientific phases of soils, farm crops, and animal husbandry, and give 
the student a fundamental conception of modern agriculture. 

4. Courses for students desiring to prepare for garden super- 
vision work. For such students, courses 1, 2, 3 and 5 are recommended 
for one year's work. If more than one year can be devoted to the 
preparation, courses 6, 7 and 8 are suggested as further electives. 

5. Courses for students preparing for Superintendencies of Con- 
solidated Schools and for special teachers of Agriculture. 

6. Courses for students who plan to complete a four-year course 



160 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

in the Agricultural College, preparatory to teaching under the Smith- 
Hughes Act. Under the provision of this law, the teacher must be 
a graduate of an agricultural college, but plans have been workt out 
whereby the first two years of this may be done in Michigan State 
Normal College. 

The following distribution of subjects is recommended for a two- 
year course in agriculture for the students classifying under above 
paragraphs 5 and 6: 

Preferential General Courses 

English 1 and 3 2 units 

Mathematics 14 and 15 2 units 

Education 1, 2, 3, and 16 4 units 

Teachers' Courses 2 units 

Teaching 2 units 

Preferential Agricultural Courses 

Agriculture 2 (Soils) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Farm Crops) 1 unit 

Agriculture 4 (Animal Husbandry) 1 unit 

Agriculture 5 (Gardening) 1 unit 

Agriculture 8 (Rural Organization) 1 unit 

1 'referential Science Courses 

Chemistry 3 and 4 2 units 

Physics 4 and 5 , 2 units 

Botany 1 and 5 2 units 

Desirable Elective Courses 

( reography 1 Botany 2 

Geology 1 Agriculture 6 

Zoology 4, (> or 9 Chemistry 7 

Students specializing along any line of agriculture should con- 
sult the head of department in regard to their teachers' courses and 
science electives. 

1 . G( ru ral Agriculture. I unit. 

Thifl course, formerly known as" Botany 7, aims to give th€ 
student a general knowledge of the scientific principles aid 
practices involved in modern agriculture; The work will be 
made as practical aspossible by means of numerous labora 



NATURAL SCIENCES 161 



tory exercises. It is planned for the students of the Rural 
School Curriculum and such other students as can devote 
only one term to this subject. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Soils. 1 unit. 

The object of this course is to give the student a knowledge 
of the nature, origin, composition, and management of the 
soil. It should be taken by all students who wish to specialize 
along any line of agricultural work. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Farm Crops. 1 unit. 

In the study of farm crops the student will become familiar 
with the botanical nature, uses, distribution, types, culture, 
harvesting,' and methods of improvement of our common 
grain, forage, fiber, and root crops. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Animal Husbandry. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of 
the various breeds of live stock (including poultry). A study 
of the principles of feeding, judging and management of live 
stock will constitute an important part of the work. The 
dairy and poultry industry will be especially emphasized. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Gardening. 1 unit. 
The object of this course, formerly Botany 8, is to give teachers 
a knowledge of school and home gardening. It will consist 
of a special study of the types and culture of our common 
vegetable crops. The relation of the subject to the school 
will be discussed. Each student will be assigned a plot of 
ground 12' x 30' to be planted in a variety of vegetables. 
The planting, cultivation, succession cropping, and control 
of insect pests by spraying will constitute a large portion of the 
laboratory work. Gardening should be preceded by Agri- 
culture 1 or its equivalent. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hover. 
21 






162 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Horticulture. 1 unit. 

In the study of horticulture, emphasis will be placed on our 
common orchard and small fruit crops. The topics empha- 
sized will be varieties, culture, propagation, pruning, care of 
fruit, and control of diseases by spraying. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hover. 



. 



7. Floriculture and Landscape Art. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of 
the kinds and culture of our common garden flowers and or- 
namental shrubbery. The use of these in the planting of 
home and school grounds will be a feature of the work. Each 
student will make a plan for the planting of a city lot or country 
home, as a practical project. The campus and science gardens 
will be used as illustrative material. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

8. Rural Organization. 1 unit. 

The object of the course in rural organization is to give the 
student a knowledge of the forces at work for uplift of rural 
life. Methods of cooperating and utilizing the work of these 
organizations for vitalization of the teacher's work in the 
community will be emphasized. The various federal and state 
efforts will be studied, as well as work of such agencies as 
the Grange, the press, and the church. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Hover. 

YZ. Farm Biology, Vz unit. 

Tli is is largely a field course, dealing with the natural flora 
I fauna of the farm. The course will not only seek to give 
.'in appreciation of the native plant and animal life as we find 
it on the farm, but will also endeavor to show the important 
relationship which some of these bear to agriculture. A nearby 
typical farm will be .-elected for intensive study. 
Bummer term. \ sociate Professor Hover. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 163 



BOTANY 



1. Plant Biology. 1 unit. 

This course aims to introduce the student to the plant world; 
to acquaint him with some of the fundamental principles of 
plant life; and to give him an understanding of his vital relation 
to the world about him. 

If Plant Biology be combined with Animal Biology it gives a 
course in General Biology which serves as a splendid introduc- 
tion to the whole world of living things. General Biology not 
only gives a necessary basis for more advanst work in Natural 
Science, but also deals with knowledge essential to grade teachers 
in order that they may rightly guide children to an appreciation 
of Nature. It likewise forms an almost indispensable foundation 
for a proper understanding of Psychology. 

Plants are studied as living, working organisms which play 
an important part in the world. Experiments are performed 
and a microscopic examination of tissues is made in order 
that the student may understand how plants carry on their 
work. Fruits and seeds are studied both from the botanical 
and economic standpoints. Much use is made of the science 
green house and some excursions are made. Laboratory work 
lectures and recitations. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Goddard and Assistant. 

2. Practical Plant Studies. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the flora of the region, including both 
wild and cultivated plants. Special effort is made to acquaint 
the student with the common weeds and flowers of the locality 
and to make him familiar with the principal plant families. 
Those species and genera which are of most economic impor- 
tance are selected for illustrating the various families. Much 
of the work is done in the field, making use of the science garden 
and other parts of the campus, and the nearby woods. A few 
trips are made to interesting localities farther away. 
This is a particularly desirable course for agricultural stu- 
dents, and for those intending to teach in the grades. It 



164 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

is also the course for any one who wishes to know the flowers 

of field and wood. 

Spring or fall terms. Associate Professor Goddard. 

3. Seedless Plants. 1 unit. 

In this course a study is made of many of the seedless forms of 
plant life common to our ponds and streams. Molds, rusts, 
smuts, mushrooms and other fungi common to our locality, 
mosses, ferns, lycopods and horsetails are studied. Attention 
is given to questions of fertilization, reproduction, alternation 
of generations, and plant evolution as seen in three of the great 
divisions of the plant kingdom. Stress is laid on the great 
economic importance of many of these lower forms of plant 
life. Early in the quarter a week end collecting trip is made to 
some near-by lake region and toward the close, the conserva- 
tories at Belle Isle are visited where a fine fern and lycopod 
collection is examined. A few other short field trips are also 
taken. Laboratory work, lectures and recitations. 
Fall term only. Associate Professor Goddard. 

I. Fungi. Vi unit. 

A course devoted to the study of the common edible and poison- 
ous mushrooms and other fungi of the region. It deals with 
such questions as their identification, manner of growth, con- 
ditions under which they thrive, methods of preserving her- 
barium specimens, and the economic importance of fungi. Il- 
lustrated lectures are done in the field collecting specimens, 
Btudying their habitat and the damage they do to trees, 
railroadties,posts, etc. Specimens are taken to the laboratory 
for identification, where free use is made of library books and 
herbarium specimens. Usually one or two trips are made to 
near-by lake regions. 
Summer term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

5 Plant Physiology, J unit, 

This ie a cour c designed to give the student a practical knowl- 
edge of the work of plants. ft also gives him an opportunity 
bo do individual experimental work in the laboratory, so that 
I e tmiliar with die handling of laboratory equipment 

and setting up of experiments. If deals mainly with advanst 
ph] I 1 ing up such problems as growth, food making. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 165 



irritability, the nature of stored food, the action of ferments 
and the part played in the world by each portion of the plant. 
In order to show how plant organs increase in size and attain 
their mature forms, a study of cell division is made. This 
course is especially practical for agricultural students and 
those who expect to teach botany. It should be preceded by 
course 1 or its equivalent. Students who are planning to take 
Chemistry of Common Life, or other work in chemistry, will 
find it helpful to do so, if possible, before taking this course. 
Winter term only. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Field Botany. 1 unit. 

This course presupposes high school botany or should be pre- 
ceded by Botany 1 given in the Normal. Plants are studied in 
relation to their habitat, so the course consists largely of out- 
door work. A study of plant societies is made, grouping 
plants according to the amount of light and moisture they 
require. Attention is given to structural adaptation to en- 
vironment and to the habits of plants. The student becomes 
familiar with the flowers and trees of the vicinity, identifying 
the latter by their buds, bark, fruit and general appearance. 
Such ecological subjects as cross-pollination, seed distribution, 
and perpetuation of species receive special attention. Many 
economical questions relating to plant life are considered. 
Spring term only. Associate Goddard., 

Plant Embryology. 1 unit. 

This is a study in the embryology of seed plants and is really 
a continuation of Botany 3. Here, as in that course, much 
attention is given to development from the evolutionary stand- 
point. These two courses aim to present evolution as seen 
in the plant world. The development of calyx, corolla, stamens 
and pistils is traced, special attention being given to the for- 
mation and growth of pollen grains and ovules. The process 
of fertilization and the development of the embryo are carefully 
studied and explained. The work includes some training in 
the making of permanent mounts showing sections of various 
parts of the flower. This course should be preceded b}^ the 
course in Seedless Plants. 
Winter or spring term. Associate Professor Goddard. 



L6G NORMAL COLLEGE FEAR BOOK 

10. Botanical Problems. 1 unit. 

This course is open to those who have had Plant courses 3 and 
9. Individual problems in plant physiology, morphology, or ec- 
ology are assigned each student, the nature of the problem 
depending upon the materials available, the season of the year, 
and the student's preference. The laboratory study is sup- 
plemented by library and field work and from time to time each 
member of the class reports as to the methods pursued and 
results obtained. Hours to be arranged. 
Fall or spring term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

11. Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds. 1 unit. 

While this course is designed especially for students taking 
the special courses in Domestic Science and Physical Educa- 
tion, it is a course of practical value to other students as well, 
as it deals with problems of vital interest to all. Emphasis 
is placed on the study of the nature and work of those bacteria 
t hat affect the home, either in their relation to food, (such as 
milk, butter, cheese, meats, etc.,) or disease. Questions re- 
lating to the prevention of bacterial diseases are considered. 
The nature, action, and uses of the cultivated yeasts, and their 
relation to the "wild" yeasts, together with the modes of 
culture and destruction of the molds that are a source of annoy- 
ance in the home are studied. Some attention is also given to 
soil bacteria and their great value. The course is given by 
means of lectures, recitations and laboratory practice. 
Fall and Winter terms. Associate Professor Goddard, 

1L'. Botanical Teaching, Yi unit. 

Illustrated lectures, assigned reading and discussion make up 
the course. Ii is designed especially for high school teachers 
of botany and deals with the problem of what to teach in 
choolf devoting a semester to the subject and what should 
be included in a year's course. Mel hods of presenting the sub- 
ject matter are discussed and many experiments performed 
to illustrate the activities ofplanl life Students are shown how 
'" collect, press and preserve plant material. Text and library 
book are di cui ed. Some collecting trips are made. An 
hour "i out ide work daily is required. 
Summer term. \ sociate Professor Goddard or assistant. 



NATtTRAL SCIENCES 167 



Civic Biology. ]/2 unit. 

This course is offered to help teachers of all grades to under- 
stand the civic problems of a community; to demonstrate 
their vital relation to the large body of such problems and 'to 
lead them to an understanding of how they can help to solve 
them. It deals with questions of civic forestry; edible and 
poisonous mushrooms; how to combat the fry, mosquito, cab- 
bage butterfly and other harmful insects; beautifying home 
grounds; control of weeds; bacteria in their relation to soil 
and disease; and other important topics. Civic Biology by 
Hodge and Dawson is the text used. 
Summer session. Associate Professor Goddard or assistant. 



GEOLOGY 



Minerals and Rocks. 1 unit. 

This is a practical course in the study of our common min- 
erals and rocks. Blowpipe methods and simple chemical man- 
ipulation are taught. Special attention is given to Michigan 
minerals, their occurrence, formation and economic import- 
ance. An elementary knowledge of chemistry will be found 
helpful, but is not required. 

Fall term only, with usually an abridged course during the 
summer. Professor Sherzer. 

Dynamical Geology. 1 unit. 

This course is intended to give some idea of the agencies which 
have determined the shape and character of the earth's sur- 
face, and which are still at work in modifying it. These agencies 
are classified under the following heads: atmospheric, aqueous, 
glacial, organic and igneous. The method of type study is 
utilized quite largely, the various earth features being repre- 
sented by a special example which is studied in some detail. 
The work consists of lectures, reports upon special topics and 
recitations. The lantern and collection of photographs are 
made use of thruout the course. No previous work is assumed, 
although a knowledge of physics and chemistry "as well as of 
minerals and rocks, will be found helpful. 
Winter term, 2-3. Professor Sherzer. 



168 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

.3 Agricultural Geology. H unit. 

This is an elementary course in laboratory and field geology 
with especial emphasis upon those topics of most interest to 
the student of agriculture. A simple study will be made of the 
common minerals and rocks from which the bulk of our north- 
ern soils has been derived. With this as a basis, the soils them-- 
selves will be made the subject of study so far as their ori- 
gin, composition and distribution are concerned. The geologi- 
cal agencies of chief importance to the agriculturist, such as 
the atmosphere, running water, moving ice, plants and ani- 
mals, will be studied in as much detail as time permits. No 
especial preliminary knowledge is presupposed and the course 
is recommended for those who desire a somewhat broader 
foundation for grade work in agriculture or geography. 

Two consecutive hours, are desired in order to secure sufficient 
time for field trips and laboratory exercises. But little addi- 
tional work will be required. 
Summer session, as needed. Professor Sherzer. 

4. Field Geology. 1 unit. 

A practical course in the study of the local surface features of 
southeastern Michigan by means of field trips. This leads 
into work of ice, water, wind, and organisms, the four great 
agencies chiefly responsible for the physiographic features of 
Michigan and adjacent regions. Rather detailed reports of 
<h trip are prepared, illustrated with drawings and blue 
prints and made into a note book. Class discussions will be 
used to fully explain and fix in mind the foundation principles. 
Pupils Looking forward to this course are urged to precede it 
with either Courses 1 or 2, or both. 
i Ing term. Professor Sherzer. 



NATURE STUDY 



Nature Study. \ unit. 

ned for those who expect to teach in tin; 

or who expecl to supervise such teaching. 
The wot] i directed by printed outlines and consists of quizzal 
lectures and demonstrations covering the elementary principles 



NATURAL SCIENCES 169 

of nature and the evolution of the inorganic and the organic 
worlds. The parallel development of the race and the child, 
the purposes of Nature Study, the principles of method and a 
detailed primary and intermediate course are presented and 
discust as far as time permits. Devices for the keeping of 
Jive material in the school room are exhibited in operation and 
described. So far as the season permits special attention is 
given to the study of the domestic animals, birds and trees. 
Each term, with an abridged course during the summer session. 
A special section is offered in the spring quarter for those 
specializing in the kindergarten course. A special course is 
also arranged for intermediate and rural students, as needed. 
Two sections, 11-12 and 2-3. Professor Sherzer. 

Woodcraft Nature Study. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to bring the student into close touch 
with Nature and so consists largely of work done in the out-of- 
doors. It aims to familiarize the student with the common 
birds, butterflies, flowers, shrubs and trees of the locality which 
are studied in the habitat.- It gives the nature knowledge 
specially needed by those mj charge of Camp Fire Girls, the 
Boy Scouts, Woodcraft League, and similar organizations. It 
is intended to be specially helpful to teachers of nature study, 
but it deals with information which every teacher of natural 
science in high school should know. No previous preparatory 
courses are required. Reed's Bird Guide and Michigan Trees, 
by Otis, are used for identification work. 
Summer session. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Elementary Science for Rural Schools. 1 unit. 

A special course planned for those preparing to teach in rural 
schools. A selected list of topics will be presented especially 
applicable to the country environment and presented in the 
most practical manner possible. Short field trips, laboratory 
exercises and class-room demonstration will feature the course. 
Among the topics treated will be birds, trees, seed distribution, 
bees, ants, silk moth, minerals, rocks, soils, erosion, weather, 
oxydation, along with the principles of natural and artificial 
selection. 
Spring term. Professor Sherzer. 



170 NOKMAl COLLEGE TEAR BOUK 



PHYSIOLOGY 



Is. Physiology. V2 unit. 

A course designed especially to meet the needs of institute 
students and others desiring a review of general physiology. 
The main topics of physiology and hygiene that are likely 
to be touched upon in the county examinations will be con- 
sidered. Some good modern text will be used as a basis for 
the discussions and demonstrations. 
Summer term only. 

2. Teachers' Physiology. 1 unit. 

This course seeks to make a direct appeal to efficient, health- 
ful living thru class discussions of the relation of exercise, 
sleep, eating, bathing and dressing to our daily work and 
ultimate success. The endeavor is to create first, the right 
attitude of mind toward the body; secondly, to establish right 
habits of living on basic physiological principles. 

To these ends the anatomy and physiology of the chief sys- 
tems of organs will be as fully demonstrated as possible, and 
their proper care set forth. 

About two weeks of the time is devoted to the hygiene of 
the pelvic organs. 

The class work consists of lectures, demonstrations and 
recitations. 

One or two sections each term. Associate Professor Phelps and 
Miss Supe. 

:> .Special Physiology for Women. 1 unit. 

This is advanst work open only to those who have had a course 
involving the use of the compound microscope and the Teachers' 
course in physiology, or its equivalent. 

A i.ipid review of an abridged evolutionary series of ani- 
mals and plants is firsl made in order to lay a broad biological 
c tli<- study of human sex-social functioning. The 
of the adolescent boy and girl, heredity, eugenics, 
methods of guarding and instructing children and of conducting 
parents meet discust. A large reference library is 

open for the u <• of the studenl -. 
Phelps. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 171 



I. Laboratory Physiology. 1 unit. 

This is a laboratory course in physiology, having Zoology 2 
or its equivalent, and Chemistry 1 or its equivalent as prereq- 
uisites. The constitution of the chief digestive fluids and their 
action on foods; the nature of muscle action; the secretion 
of glands, and the nature of nervous reflexes; the structure 
and use of the eye and ear; the psychology of the senses of 
taste, smell and temperature, are among the topics studied. 
An attempt is made to relate the course to the work of Home 
Economics, Education and Physical Training, to that end 
about three weeks will be devoted to the dissection of a small 
mammal, with special attention to the nervous system. 
Spring term, two consecutive hours daily, (no outside prepara- 
tion of lessons is required). 
Associate Professor Phelps and Miss Supe. 

5. Mental Hygiene. 1 unit. 

A course designed to study those conditions that make for easy 
mental adjustments; the underlying causes of fears and worries; 
and the relation of the internal secretions to the proper coordinat- 
ing of body and mind. The discussions are based largely 
upon the work of Cannon: " Bodily Changes in Pain, Hunger, 
Fear, and Rage, " and that of Crille in: "The Origin and Nature 
of the Emotions." 
Winter, spring, and summer terms. Associate Professor Phelps. 

6. Good Health. Y% credit. 

This course is required of all students on the rural course and 
may also be elected by others. It seeks to give the prospective 
teacher of the elementary grades an insight into the principles 
underlying the teaching of community and home hygiene, 
together with some material for presenting the same in the 
school-room. Only the more important and practical topics 
will be discussed; such as common communicable diseases, 
germs, school home and community hygiene, personal hygiene 
(posture, exercise, food and digestion, mouth hygiene, care of 
skin, hair, nails, respiration, mental hygiene, etc.) 
Fall term, twice a week. Miss Supe. 



172 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



ZOOLOGY 



Animal Biology 1. 1 unit. 

An introductory course in animal biology, profitably taken by 
those who can devote but a single term to work in this field, 
as well as those who desire a foundation for later work in zoo- 
logy and physiology. The study of the structure, physiology, 
behavior, reproductive processes and life histories of a series 
of typical animals is made the basis for a consideration of the 
fundamental conceptions and practical applications of biological 
science. Some of the topics considered are: the characteristics 
of living organisms, the structure and activities of the cell, 
the nature of life and theories concerning its origin, the evolu- 
tion and significance of sex, the essential principles of heredity, 
the evidences and factors of organic evolution, the animal 
mind, the relations of animals to one another and to man. The 
course is open to first year students. Lectures, laboratory 
work and recitations. Hegners Introduction to Zoology is 
used as a text. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Smith. 

Animal Biology 2. 1 unit. 

An introduction to the study of the anatomy, histology and 
physiology of vertebrates. Laboratory work on the frog is 
made the basis for a comparative study of the structure and 
physiology of man and other vertebrates. The course is open 
to first year students, and need not be preceded by Animal 
Biology 1. Walter's Physiology and Hygiene is used as a 

<: Smith's Laboratory Guide for the Study of the Frog is 

d in the laboratory. 
Winter term, three sections. Associate Professor Smith and 
tant. 

Bird and Mammals. 1 unit or J^ unit. 

A lecture, laboratory and field course devoted to the study 

of Michigan bird* and wild mammals. A considerable part of 

the time i j»<-,it in the field, where (he student learns to recog- 

/• the local birds in their natural environment, and becomes 

miliar with their peculiarities of flight, song and nesting hab- 



u 



NATURAL SCIENCES 11 



its. Iii the laboratory a large collection of mounted birds is 
available for study, and the student learns to identify all the 
more common birds of the state. Bird migration is studied in 
order that the student may know what birds to expect at a 
given season of the year. Adaptations for flight and for par- 
ticular modes of life, the psychology of bird behavior, and 
the economic importance* of birds are among the topics con- 
sidered in the lectures. About one-fourth of the time is de- 
voted to the natural history of the more important wild mam- 
mals, studied both in the field and in the laboratory. The 
department possesses a good collection of mounted specimens of 
the fur-bearing animals native to Michigan. The course is es- 
pecially adapted to the needs of teachers of nature study in 
the graded schools, and is open to first-year students, without 
pre-requisites. It is desirable that students provide them- 
selves with field or opera glasses. The work of the first six 
weeks dealing almost exclusively with birds, may be taken 
separately for Yi unit credit. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Smith. 

Insects. 1 unit. 

A lecture, laboratory and field course devoted to the study of 
the native insects. The work includes a careful study of the 
structure and physiology of a few typical insects, but in addi- 
tion the student learns to identify and classify insects, and be- 
comes familiar with the life-histories and habits of a large 
number of local forms. The social relations of insects, their 
economic importance and relation to the dissemination of 
disease, receive special attention. Methods of collecting and 
caring for living insects, the preservation of insects, and methods 
of combating injurious insects, are taught. The course is of 
special value to teachers of nature study, agriculture and 
general zoology. Sanderson and Jackson's Elementary En- 
tomology is used as a text. The course is open to first year 
students without previous training in zoology. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Smith. 

Invertebrate Zoology. 1 unit. 

This course, supplemented by the course in Vertebrate Zool- 
ogy, aims to give the student a general survey of the animal 



174 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

kingdom without duplicating work given in other courses. 
The course comprises a study of the structure, physiology, 
classification/ life-histories, habits and distribution of in- 
vertebrate animals, with special attention to the most impor- 
tant types and to the local fauna. Lectures, laboratory work, 
and occasional recitations. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 (Animal 
Biology 1) or an equivalent. Hegner's College Zoology is 
used as a text. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Smith. 

6. Vertebrate Zoology, limit. 

The structure, physiology, classification, life-histories, habits, 
and distribution of vertebrate animals. Special attention is 
given to the comparative anatomy of a few of the most im- 
portant types, and to the natural history of local vertebrates 
excepting birds and mammals, which are studied in course 3. 
This course is similar in aim and method to the course in 
Invertebrate Zoology. It is desirable that this course be 
preceded by either Zoology 1 (Animal Biology 1), or Zoology 
2 (Animal Biology 2). Hegner's College Zoology is used as a 
text. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Smith. 

7. Mammalian Anatomy, limit. 

A laboratory course on the gross anatomy of the cat, or rabbit, 
Including comparisons with other vertebrates particularly 
man and Hie domestic animals. The work is of especial value 
to those intending to teach human physiology, physical training 
or agriculture. In order to be admitted to this course the 
Btudent must have taken either Zoology 2 (Animal Biology 
2;, or Zoology o' (Vertebrate Zoology). 
Spring term. Associate Professor Smith. 

.1 nimal Embryology. 1 unit . 

An introduction to the fundamental facts and principles of 
t}i«- reproduction and development of animals. Lectures, 
laboratory work, and recitations. In the laboratory a study 
made of the life-histories of a few of the most important 
i'Ii special attention to such features as the development 
of the germ cells, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, early cm- 



NATURAL SCIENCES 175 



bryo-forination and the development of organs. The lectures 
include a consideration of the more general aspects of the 
subject, such as the physical basis of heredity, the biogenetic 
law, theories of development, and modern experimental work 
in the field of embryology. The course aims to give an insight 
into general biological problems, as well as the key to the 
adult structure of animals and the basis for an understanding 
of the special embryology of man. Kellicott's Outlines of 
Chordate Development is used as a text. The course is not 
open to first year students, except by special permission; at 
least one term's work in animal biology or zoology is a prereq- 
uisite. This course will be given in 1922, but not in 1923, 
since it alternates with course 10. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Smith. 

Heredity and Eugenics. 1 unit. 

Illustrated lectures, assigned reading and discussions, dealing 
with the more fundamental aspects of inheritance with partic- 
ular reference to man. The course aims to present the bio- 
logical facts and principles underlying the phenomena of hered- 
ity, and the more important results of modern work in the 
study of inheritance in plants, animals and the human species. 
It should serve as a basis for a critical understanding of the 
modern eugenics movement. Some of the topics considered 
are: inheritance defined and illustrated; current misconceptions; 
reproduction, development and the physical basis of heredity; 
the question of the inheritance of acquired characters; 
Mendel's principles of heredity; sex-determination; sex-linked 
inheritance; pure line breeding and the genotype conception 
of heredit}^; application of the principles of heredity to the 
improvement of domesticated races of plants and animals; 
the method of evolution; the inheritance of physical and mental 
traits in man, and the possible improvement of the human race 
thru the intelligent appreciation of the known laws of inheri- 
tance. It is desirable, tho not absolutely necessary, that this 
course be preceded by Zoology 1 or its equivalent. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Smith. 

Zoological Technique. 1 unit. 

A teachers' course in laboratory and field methods, for students 



176 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAH BOOK 

who have had at least two terms' w r ork in animal biology or 
zoology of college grade. The aim of the work is to give the 
student the technical knowledge and training required for 
conducting high school courses in zoology. Students are 
taught methods of collecting and caring for living material, 
preparing material for class use, and making permanent anatomi- 
cal and histological preparations. The student acquires a 
set of microscopical preparations of his own making, suitable 
for use hi high school work. The equipment of high school 
laboratories, and the aims and methods of laboratory teaching, 
are discust. This course alternates with Course 8 in successive 
years; course 10 will be given in 1923. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Smith. 

11. Zoology , Organic Evolution and Heredity. }/% unit. 

This is a special course, elementary in its nature but intended 
for mature students. It deals with the historical development 
of the subject and endeavors to make clear the theories and 
principles involved, takes up numerous illustrations drawn 
from the plant and animal world and extends the discussions 
to the human race. 

Given during the winter as a Saturday morning course so that 
it might be taken as an extension course by teachers in the 
vicinity. Professor Sherzer. 

DEGREE COURSES 

I Or work <'i the lasl two college years the courses in Botany 1 and 

<1 Nature Study 1 are not accepted. Specializing students or 

ecting majors and minors in the department may elect any 

of the other ' Mch have not already been used in securing 

their certificates. General students may also elect from this list 

upon the advice of the head of the department. Courses in Botany 

9 and n». Z and L0 are especially intended for advanst students 

d the requisite amount of preparatory w r ork. Those 

uld confer with the instructors concerned. 



PENMANSHIP 177 



SPECIALIZING STUDENTS 

Students of special aptitude in the natural sciences and with some 
successful experience in teaching are invited to make application for 
enrollment as specializing students of the department after one or 
more subjects have been completed. A limited number of such stu- 
dents will be accepted, only as many as there is reasonable hope of 
locating in our Michigan high schools. From this list of students 
there are selected " student assistants/' who give the department 
two hours' time daily and receive $153 compensation. 



PENMANSHIP 

Harry M. Hill. 

The aim of the course is to train students to express thought in 
plain rapid hand writing without conscious physical effort. 

A credit in writing is earned by satisfying three requirements as 
follows: 

Pen practice, Blackboard writing, and a final written report on 
class management and methods of teaching writing. 

Text-book, The Teaching of Handwriting by Freeman. 

An advanst course for those desiring to supervise writing in public 
schools is now offered. Hours, 7-8 and 11-12 a. m.; 4-5 p. m. 
High school rooms. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Professor Wilbur P. Bowen. 

Associate Professors — Mrs. Fannie Cheever Burton, Joseph 

H. McCulloch. 

* Assistant Professor Anna M. Wolfe. 

Instructors — Irene O. Clark, Chloe Todd, Elton Ryne arson, 

Mabel P. Bacon. Lera Curtis. 

Medical Examiner for Women — |Mrs. Glenadine C. Snow. 



fAlso special teacher of hygiene, with salary paid by the Inter- 
departmental Social Hygiene Board. 
23 



ITS NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



GENERAL STATEMENT 






This department offers work of two kinds : 

(a). Physical Training. This comsists of practice in the gym- 
nasium, field, or swimming pool, designed to improve the physical 
condition of students and to make them familiar with material used 
in the schools. Here the classes for men and women are separate 
and a special suit is necessary. 

(b). Physical Education. This comsists of lectures, recitations 
and laboratory work, designed to prepare teachers and supervisors 
of physical training. These classes are, with a few exceptions, open 
to both men and women. The department also offers courses in 
Hygiene, which are listed and described separately on page 191. 

Each student is given a physical examination on entering the 
College and effort is made to make the work beneficial and to prevent 
injury. Those who are disabled or physically unfit for certain parts 
of the work are given special exercises suited to their needs. Special 
classes of women are conducted with this object in view (See Course 
W-22.) 

CREDITS AND REQUIREMENTS 

The college requires physical training of all candidates for the 
life certificate. The requirement is usually four terms; the specific 
requirement for each group is stated in the former pages -out lining the 
various curricula. (See pages 70 to 90). 

Students should begin physical training at once on entering, to 
avoid trouble due to conflicts and crowding of work that are apt to 
occur if it is left to be done later. 

Work in physical training is markt and credited as in other sub- 
jects, the nature of the work making regularity of attendance even 
more necessary than in other college work. 

Credits for physical training and for other subjects-are not inten 
changeable; thai is, extra credits in physical training cannot be used 
in place of academic or professional subjects that a student lacks, 
nor (Mj extra credits in Other college subjects take the place of the 
required units of physical training. 






PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 79 



PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 

Women entering the College in the fall have a choice among six 
courses: Physical Training Wll, W12, W13, W14, W15, and W16 
Those found to be physically unfit for such vigorous exercise are as- 
signed to W17 or W22. 

The three remaining units of required physical training are grouped 
according to the grade of teaching for which the student is preparing. 
Those who are preparing to teach in high schools take Wl, W2, and 
W3; intermediate grades or junior high school, W4, W5, and'w6: 
those who plan to teach in the kindergarten or primary grades, W7, 
W8, and W9. The last required courses, viz., W3, W6, and W9, are 
teachers' courses, giving practice in teaching physical training. 

The regulation suit, which costs about $5, consists of plain white 
middy blouse and full black bloomers. This is required for classes 
m the gymnasium and can be used in outdoor games, such as tennis, 
hockey, baseball and volley ball. Students are advised to purchase 
suits of authorized firms here, since that plan has proven most sat- 
isfactory. Soft-soled shoes are required in gymnasium classes and in 
tennis, and an inexpensive suit is needed in swimming. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Note.— Courses for women specializing in Physical Education are 
listed separately on pages 85 and 86. 

Wl. Swedish Gymnastics, Dancing and Games Suitable for High School 
Teachers. 1 unit. Winter term. 

W2. German Gymnastics, Dancing and Games for High School Teachers. 
1 unit. Spring term. 

*V3. Teachers' Course following Wl and W2. Each term. 

These three courses are under general charge of Mrs. Burton 
and Miss Todd and are required of women preparing to teach 
m high schools. 

r4. Gymnastics, Dancing and Games Suitable for Teachers of Upper 
Grades. 1 unit. Winter term. 

Vo. Similar to W4. 1 unit. Spring term. 

\ r G. Teachers' Course, following W4. and W5. Fall and spring terms. 



ISO NORMAL COLLEGE SEAS BOOK 

These three courses are under general charge of Misses Wolfe 
and Curtis, and are required of women preparing to teach in 
the intermediate grades. 

W7. Exercises Suitable for Teachers of Primary Grades. 1 unit- 
Winter term. 

W8. Similar lo W7. Spring term. 

W9. Teachers 7 Course, following W7 and W8. Each term. 

v These three courses are under general charge of Misses Clark 
and Bacon, and are required of women preparing to teach in 
the kindergarten or primary grades. 

Wll. Folk Dancing. 1 unit. Each term. 

W12. Swimming. 1 unit. Each term. 

W13. Volley Ball. Yi unit. Fall and spring terms. 

W14. Basket Ball, 1 unit, Winter term. 

W15. Tennis. V2 unit, Each term except winter. 

W16. Hockey. 1 unit. Fall term. 

W17. Cross Country Walking. 1 unit. Fall term. 

WIS. Baseball for Women, limit. Spring term. 
Played with the soft indoor ball. 

W20. Aesthetic Dancing, limit, Winter term. 

W22. Special Hygienic and Corrective Exercises. 

Special exercises adapted to the needs of those found phys- 
ically deficient . Each form. 

SUMMARY OF COURSES FOR WOMEN 

I all term: Wll, W12, W13, Wll, W15, W16, W17, W22. 
Winter term: Wi, Wl, \Y7, W12, Wl ■!, W3, W9, Wll, W22. 
Spring term: W2, W3, W5, W6, \vx, w<>, Wll, WIS, W22. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR MEN 

cal training Ml. M2, M5 and M ( .> are required of .-ill men em 
cepl when & man b transferred to another course hoa\ .use of physical 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 181 



disability or because of ability to take a more advanced course. Men 
are also expected to be able to swim. The other courses described 
felow may be taken as elcctives. 

In all indoor courses except swimming a regulation suit is required, 
and this is the usual white track suit, costing about $2.50. Soft- 
soled shoes are needed in addition. Another special suit, better adapted 
for work in heavy gymnastics, is required of men who specialize in 
physical education. 

COURSES FOR MEN 

Ml. Gymnastics and Indoor Athletics. 1 unit. 

This course, which should be taken by all men in the winter 
term of the first year, includes posture training, general gym- 
nastics and athletics suitable for boys of high school age, basket 
ball, volley ball, indoor base ball, and other indoor games. 
Required. 
Winter term. Associate Professor McCulloch and assistants. 

M2. Field Athletics. 1 unit. 

This course, which should be taken by all men in the fall term 
of the first year, includes training in soccer and in the elements 
of football and other field sports. Required. 
Fall term. Associate Professor McCulloch. 

M3. Swimming. 1 unit. 

This course includes instruction and practice in swimming, 

diving and life saving. Every man is expected to be able to 

swim 100 yeards, to use at least three standard swimming 

strokes and two forms of diving. 

Elective for those who pass the requirement. 

Each term. Mr. Lathers. 

M4. Tennis. 1 unit. 

The college courts afford opportunity for from 40 to 50 men 
to play tennis, and in the Spring term a team plays several 
games with teams from other colleges. When the weather in 
the Fall and Spring prevents the playing of tennis, some work 
in the gymnasium, such as basket ball, volley ball or swimming 
is substituted so as to permit the earning of a full unit of credit. 
Elective, 



182 NOHMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






Fall, spring and summer terms. Professor Bowen and assist- 
ants. 

M5. Track and Field Sports. 1 unit. 

Instruction and practice in the details of all the standard 
track and field sports. A college team has dual meets with 
teams from other colleges and takes part in the Michigan Inter- 
collegiate Track and Field Meet in June. Class contests are 
scheduled for the men not making the team. Required. There 
is also opportunity for indoor training in the winter term. 
Spring term. Associate Professor McCulloch. 

M6. Basketball 1 unit, 

We usually have 50 men or more enrolled in basketball. A 
college team is selected and a second team, each playing a 
schedule of games with the teams of other institutions. Men 
not making these teams are organized into a class league of 
six or eight teams and they play a tournament among them- 
selves and with other local teams. Elective. 
Winter term and the last few weeks of the fall term. Mr. 
Rynearson and assistants. 

M8. Football 1 unit. 

Instruction is given each fall to 40-60 men in the college game 
of football. A first team plays about seven games with the 
teams of other colleges and a second team usually has a shorter 
schedule. Elective. 
Fall term. Mr. Rynearson, and assistants. 

MO. Baseball 1 unit. 

A large clans is conducted in this sport, including a first team 
and Beveral class teams. Effort is made to train all the men 
in the details of batting, base running, fielding, signals, team 
work, plays, rules, etc Required. 
Spring and summer terms. Mr. Rynearson. 

M 10. Folk Dancing, l unit. 

Thifl course i. designed to acquainl men who arc preparing to 
supervise physical training with the most Important forms of 
foil, dancing, especially forms thai are useful for boys and men. 
I -ill term. Associate Professor Burton. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 183 



SUMMARY OF COURSES FOR MEN 

Fall term: Ml, M2, M3, M4, M6 (last 4 weeks), M8 ; M10. 
Winter term: Ml, M3, M5. M6. 
Spring term: M3, M4, M5, M9. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

1. Mechanics of Exercise. 1 unit. 

A text-book course on the mechanism of bodily movements 
and the anatomy of muscles, bones and joints. The mech- 
anism of bodily deformities and spinal curvatures is included . 
Fall term. Professor Bo wen. 

2. Human Anatomy. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and demon- 
strations on the structure of the organs of digestion, circulation, 
respiration, and excretion, and of the nervous system. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen or Mrs. Snow. 

3. Exercise in Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A text-book course on the fundamental principles of bodily 

training and the methods and systems employed in physical 

education. 

Fall term. Professor Bowen. 

4. Corrective Gymnastics. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and demonstra- 
tions on the causation and mechanics of bodily deformities 
and practice in the treatment of such cases in the corrective 
rooms. Spinal curvature, flat foot and other remediable 
defects are included and students learn to use active and passive 
movement and massage under supervision. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen and Misses Bacon and Clark. 

5. Physiology of Digestion, Nutrition and Excretion. 1 unit. 

A text-book course presupposing courses 1 and 2 or an equiva- 
lent and also acquaintance with the chemistry of foods or 
with organic chemistry. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen. 



184 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

G. Physiology of Exercise. 1 unit. 

A textbook course, supplemented by lectures and laboratory 
work, on the physiology of muscle, nerve, circulation and 
respiration, with especial relation to the effects of bodily ex- 
ercise. 
Spring term. Professor Bo wen. 

7. History and Literature of Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A course of lectures and library work covering the history 
of physical education and making a systematic survey of the 
literature of the subject. Special study is made of the litera- 
ture on important guiding principles of physical training. Each 
student is expected to make a rather complete study of a 
chosen topic and to write a thesis upon it. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Bo wen. 

8. The Teaching of Physical Training in the Grades. 1 unit. 

A course for grade teachers, designed to prepare them to teach 

gymnastics and games to grade children. 

Every term. Professor Bowen and Associate Professor Burton. 

9. First Aid. Yi unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures, demonstrations 
and laboratory work, in bandaging, treatment of sprains, and 
other items of emergency work. 
Fall term. Associate Professor McCulloch and Miss Bacon. 

10. Health Inspection. 1 unit. 

Theory and practice of physical examination and diagnosis. 
Mrs. Snow. 

12. Teachers' Course in Gymnastics, 1 unit. 

A study of gymnastic exercises from the teacher's standpoint, 
i of commands, presentation of new material, observation, 
criticism and managemenl of classes, training of posture, etc. 
Members of the class practice the teaching of posture excr- 
ercises with dumb bells, clubs, and wands, marching, 
fin folk dancing, and story plays. Designed for spe- 

cial students of Physical Education. Others take Course 8 
Fall term. Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Burton. 






PHYSICAL EDUCATION 185 



13. Teachers' Course in Play. 1 unit. 

Text-book work on the theory of play, lectures on the prac- 
tical management of the playground, and demonstration and 
practice of games. On the practical side the following topics 
are treated: equipment, apparatus, courts, games, tournaments, 
festivals, efficiency- tests, group athletics, folk dancing, dra- 
matics, manual constructive work, and story-telling. Open only 
to special students of Physical Education and teachers of 
experience. 
Winter term. Miss Todd and Professor Bowen. 

14. Theory of Football and Basket Ball. 1 unit. 

A course designed to give men who expect to coach or officiate 
- in these sports an intimate knowledge of the rules, the techni- 
que and the strategy of each. It includes discussion of training, 
diet, prevention and treatment of injuries, equipment, systems 
of offense and defense, and hints for officials. 
Men only. 
Fall term. Mr. Rynearson. 

15. Theory of Base Ball and Track Athletics. 1 unit. 

A course for men specializing in physical education or who 
expect to coach or officiate in these sports. Rules, methods 
of training and officiating and the technique and strategy of 
each is studied. 
Winter term. Mr. Rynearson. 

17. Boy Scout Activities. Yi unit. 

Theory and practice of the organization and management of 
troops of boy scouts, including studies in woodcraft, camphig, 
and the various activities associated with the Boy Scout move- 
ment. 
Winter term. Professor McCulloch. 

18. Camp Fire Activities. J^ unit. 

Theory and practice of the organization and management of 
groups of girls according to the plan of the Camp Fire Girls, 
including general plan and ideals, making of costumes, activ- 
ities, songs, ceremonials, etc. 
Fall and summer terms. Women only. Miss Bacon. 



186 NOBMAL COLLEGE YEAlt BOOK 

19. Teaching Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A considerable number of students on the second and third 
years of the physical education course have opportunity to 
teach some phase of the work, either in the children's classes 
of the training school, the Normal High School, or in the clas- 
ses of college men and women in the gymnasium, field, and 
swimming pool. Students whose previous experience or spe- 
cial aptitude enables them to take full charge of a class may 
be able to earn a full unit of credit in one term,, but if the stu- 
dent acts as an assistant to the regular teacher and handles 
the class but a portion of the time, more than one term is needed 
to earn the full credit. 

20. Advanst Teaching in Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A limited number of students showing special aptitude in 
course 19 have opportunity to teach with full charge of a class 
and full responsibility for it. The work varies from term to 
term according to the needs of the department and the de- 
mands for certain kinds of physical training. 

21. Administration of Physical Education. 1 unit. 

The planning of courses of physical training to meet the con- 
ditions of city and rural schools, principles of supervision, 
construction and equipment of buildings, grounds, swimming 
pools, etc. 
Spring term. Professor Bowen. 

22. Teachers' Course in Athletics for Women. 1 unit. 

A course designed to give women who intend to coach and 
manage girls' athletics and officiate in such sports a full tech- 
nical knowledge of the rules, ways of playing and c >aehing, 
and the handling of large numbers in such exercises. 
Fall and summer terms. Miss Todd. 

HYGIENE COURSES 
1 . School H lill k in'. 1 1 1 nil . 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and library 

work, on the main topics of school hygiene. The object of 

the course i <<• interest and inform prospective teachers re- 

modera methods of health administration and health 

Instruction in the grades of the public schools. 



PHYSICS AM> A.STR0NOM1 



!S7 



Every term. Professor Bo wen, Associate Professor Mc- 
culloch, and Mrs. Snow. 

2. Personal Hygiene. 1 unit. 

A text-book course for men, covering the main topics of per- 
sonal hygiene, designed to stand as an equivalent for the course 
in physiology and hygiene for women that is given in the Nat- 
ural Science department. Men only. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor McCulloch. 

3. Health Work in the Schools. 1 unit. 

A study of topics and methods of promoting health in the 

various grades. 

Fall and summer terms. Professor Bowen and Mrs. Snow. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 



Professor Frederick R. Gorton. 
Assistant Professor Harry L. Smith. 

The department suggests the following three-year curriculum 
combining the Physical and Biological Sciences: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, Physics 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, Zoology 20, 23 and 24 

and 20 and 10 Nature Study 7 

English 1 Chemistry 3, 4, 5, Physiology 17 

Teaching, and 7 

Gorman, French, or Astronomy 1 Geology 27 and 28 

Spanish, two years Botany 8, 9, 10 

Also a three-year curriculum in the Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences as follows: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, Physics 4, 5, G, 7, 9, Mathematics 11, 12, 

20, and 25 and 10 14, 15, 10, 17, 18,' 19, 

and 25 

Geography 2 Chemistry 3, 4, 5, Astronomy 1 

and 7 

English 1 German, French, or Teaching. 
Spanish, two years 



188 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



By a careful selection of courses in English, Modern Languages, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry the student even in two years 
can obtain an excellent foundation for engineering or further speciali- 
zation in industrial physics or chemistry. 

All rooms are in Science Hall for the following subjects. 

For a description of equipment, see page 39. 

Ml. Mechanics. 1 unit. 

A class-room and laboratory course in the mechanics of solids 

and fluids. This is the fundamental subject in Physics and 

should be taken by all who have not had a 3^ear's work in an 

approved high school following the completion of Algebra and 

Geometry. 

Fall term, with two one-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Assistant Professor Smith. 

M2. Sound, Heat and Light. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in heat, light and sound with abun- 
dant demonstrative and laboratory work. As in the preceding 
course, the graphical method is freely used and the processes of 
Algebra and Geometry constantly employed. Emphasis is 
placed on the numerous applications of the principles developt 
to every day life. Prerequisite: Ml. 

Winter term, with two one-hour periods a week of laboratory 
work. Assistant Professor Smith. 

3. M o g aetism and Electricity. 1 unit. 

A full demonstrative course, with student's laboratory work. 
The various uses made of electricity in common life are strongly 
emphasized. Prerequisite: Ml. 

Spring term. Two one-hour periods a week of laboratory 
WOrk. Assistant Professor Smith. 

\. College Physics 1. 1 unit. 

Electricity and magnetism. An Advanst course in which elec- 
trical theory and electrical discovery are btrongly emphasized. 
Follows Physics 1, 2, and 3, or an approved course in a high 
chool, Courses 4, 5, and 6 are fundamental courses for many 
branches of engineering and medicine. Four recitations and 

lectures and one tWO-hour period per week in the laboratory. 

Note. Students classifying in Physics 4 who have not had 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 189 

Trigonometry should take that subject (Math. Lj) in the fall term. 
Fall term. Professor Gorton. 

5. College Physics 2. 1 unit. 

A demonstrative and mathematical course in advanst mechan- 
ics. Prerequisite: one year of Physics and a course in Trig- 
onometry. Four recitations and lectures and one two-hour 
period per week in the laboratory. 
Winter term. Two sections. Professor Gorton. 

G. College Physics 3. 1 unit. 

An advanst demonstrative course in acoustics and optics. Four 

recitations and lectures and one two-hour period per week in 

the laboratory. 

Prerequisite: course 5. 

Spring term. Professor Gorton. 

7. Method in Physics and General Science^ 1 unit. 

A course devoted to the preparation of students for teaching 
Physics and General Science in the high school. The first 
portion of the time is given to a careful consideration of the 
aims and content of a course in General Science. Numerous 
references to articles by the foremost promoters are discust, 
pertaining particularly to the process of relating this early 
science to common life. The remainder of the time is given 
to the equipment of a physical laboratory, care of apparatus, 
the adaptation of simplified devices, and methods of effective 
demonstration before a class. All students whose major or 
minor work is in physical science will take the course in their 
senior year. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Gorton. 

8. Principles of Physics. 1 unit. Summer only. 

A review course in high school physics. It will deal mainly 
with the principal laws of physics and their application. The 
course is intended for students who have had the subject in 
high school, with inadequate facilities for demonstrative ex- 
periments. A special feature of this course will be the study 
of the transmission and transformation of power by the elec- 
tric road which passes through the city, and the municipal 
pumping and lighting station operating from the Huron River. 



190 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

A trip to one of the several power houses of the Edison Com- 
pany will be one of the features of the course. X-ray work 
and the wireless telegraph will be seen in operation. Daily. 
Professor Gorton or Assistant Professor Smith. 

9. Advanst Laboratory Practice 1. 1 unit. 

Regular college work in Mechanics and Light, following Phys- 
ics 5 and 6 in case no laboratory work accompanied those 
courses. The student is given opportunity to make use of 
refined apparatus in measurements in elasticity, moments 
of inertia, and other mechanical properties of material, and 
also of the optical bench, spectrometer, and diffraction gratings 
in the determination of optical constants. 
Fall and spring terms. Assistant Professor Smith. 

10. Advanst Laboratory Practice 2. 1 unit. 

Regular college work in Electricity, Magnetism and Heat, 
following Physics 4 in case no laboratory work accompanied 
that course. Practical exercises dealing with the measurement 
of current, voltage, resistance, capacity, magnetic and thermal 
quantities constitute the principal features of this course. In- 
cidentally the student becomes familiar with the storage bat- 
tery, generators, gas calorimeter, and other parts of the College 
equipment. 
Winter and summer terms. Assistant Professor Smith. 

1 1 . Acoustics. Yi unit. 

A six weeks' course in the physical basis of sound with special 
reference to those who arc carrying forward studies in music, 
using Harris's Handbook or some equivalent author. This 
course embraces a study of the construction of the piano, 
organ and other instruments. 
Winter term. Pjrofessor ( rorton. 

L2. Physical Technics. I unit . 

A course in general laboratory repairing and fitting, together 
with instruction in photography. The work includes out-door 
practice with the camera, development and printing. Some 
opportunity 1S also given for making lantern slides and photo- 

kphic enlarging. Borne opportunity for operating a motion 
picture machine will be offered. Time is also given to the 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 191 

study of simple wireless telegraphs sets suitable for high school. 
The course is designed for specializing students and is taken 
only by permission. 
Professor Gorton and assistant. 

Electrical Measurements 1. 1 unit. 

A college course following a year of College Physics and Physics 
9 and 10. The scope of the work includes the methods of 
measuring resistance and current. The course is both the- 
oretical and practical. 

Fall term. Hour to be arranged by the instructor. Professor 
Gorton and Assistant. Professor Smith. 

Electrical Measurements 2. 1 unit. 

A course following the one above. The theory and practice 
of measurement as applied to electromotive force and 
capacity. 

Winter term. Hour to be arranged by the instructor. Profes- 
sor Gorton and Assistant. Professor Smith. 

Advanst Theoretical Optics. 1 unit. 
A reading course in Drude's Optics or equivalent work, with 
special reference to the following practical course. Follows 
Physics 6 and requires an elementary course in the Calculus. 
Given only when called for by five or more students. 
Term and hour to be arranged with the teacher. Professor 
Gorton. 

Advanst Practical Optics. 1 unit. 
A course in Mann's Advanst Practical Optics, or an equiv- 
alent, bringing into use the Interferometer, the Refractometer, 
the Diffraction Bench and various polariscopes and Sacchari- 
meters. May be taken as an independent course or may fol- 
low Course 15. Sequence as in the following course. 
Term and hour to be arranged. Professor Gorton. 

Household Laboratory Physics. 

Arranged especially for students of Domestic Science. The 
course is largely experimental work in the laboratory and 
deals exclusively with those parts of the subject which apply 
directly to operations and devices about the home. Among 



192 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

the special features of the work may be mentioned the following : 
Efficiency of cooking vessels, efficiency of electric lamps, oper- 
ating cost of gas and electric heating devices, heating plants, 
ventilation, etc. 
Fall term. Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor Smith. 

19. A First Course in Applied Physics. 

A beginning course prepared especially for young women 
who are pursuing any specializing curriculum. It consists 
largely of lectures and demonstrations, with a minimum of 
mathematics. Attention will be given to the great names asso- 
ciated with the development of science. The subject will 
deal in a practical way with many cases of applied physics 
hi the home and every-day life, and will cover, as far as time 
will permit, some of the fundamentals of x-ray properties and 
wireless communication. Such a selection of topics will be 
made as to accommodate the course to one term of work. 
The work is offered for those who would otherwise be unable 
to obtain any physical science course. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Gorton. 

20. Problems in Physics. % unit. 

This course which has to do entirely with the solution of prac- 
tical problems in physics is offered for those who are taking 
Physics 4, 5, and 6 thru the year. To obtain credit from one 
unit of work requires one hour per week for three terms and 
parallels a corresponding course in electrical engineering. 
Students who expect later to take up an engineering course 
should elect this subject. 
Professor Gorton. 



ASTRONOMY 



Gem "'I A- tronomy, I unit . 

A Qon-mathematica] course addrest to the large popular 
Interest in the Bubject. The course contains a great deal of 
materia] of Uf e not only to teachers of science, but to the teachi| 
of i: Some evening work upon planet arid star 

.ii witli the telescope and tracing out many of H 



i:i 



RURAL EDUCATION 193 



principal constellations is a feature of the course. The use 
of the transit instrument as well as the wireless telegraph 
installation in getting exact time and correcting the chrono- 
meter receives considerable attention. 
Fall and Spring terms. Professor Gorton. 

Instrumental Astronomy. 1 unit. 

A practical course in Astronomy following Astronomy 1 and a 
good course in Spherical Trigonometry, consisting mainly of 
work with the Sextant and a two-inch Astronomical Transit 
and the continued use from the preceding course of the Wilson 
material and the four-inch refractor. Professor Gorton. 



RURAL EDUCATION 



Miss Ella Smith. 
Miss Louise Welden. 

Requirements for admission are graduation from an accepted 
high school. 

Two curricula of study are offered : 

1. A curriculum which requires two years for completion and 
leads to a Life Certificate in Rural Education. This certificate has 
the force of a general life certificate and is valid in any Michigan 
school. 

2. A curriculum which requires one year and one summer school 
for completion and leads to a Limited Certificate. This certificate 
is valid in any school in Michigan for three years. Students who 
take out the limited certificate may later secure a life certificate on 
the completion of ten additional units of work. 

See pages 74 and 88, for outlines of these curricula. 

1. Principles of Teaching. 1 unit. 

This course is an adaptation of Education 3 to rural school 
conditions. Principles of teaching studied in the classroom 
are observed in practice in the rural training school. Pre- 
requisite to rural practice teaching. 
25 



194 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

2. School Management and Course of Study. 1 unit. 

In this course a study is made (1) of principles of organization 
and management, and of their application in a rural school; 
(2) of the Manual and Course of Study for the Elementary 
Schools of Michigan. Bulletins published by the Department 
of Public Instruction are studied to acquaint the student with 
recommendations of the department concerning organization 
and management and to supplement the subject matter of 
the course of study. 
Winter term. 

3. History of Rural Education in the United Stales. 1 unit. 

A study of the history of rural education in the United States 
and of modern movements in rural education. Consideration 
is given to new and to needed rural school legislation in Michigan 
and to what has been accomplished by recent legislative en- 
actments. 
Spring term. 

I. The Preparation of Rural Teachers. 1 unit. 

A course in supervision for those students who are preparing 
to teach in County Normal Training Classes. An intensive 
study is made of the planning of lessons, together with the 
consideration of problems in supervision that confront the 
training teacher. 

5. Teachers' Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

This course consists of a review of the typical parts of arith- 
metic and of a discussion of present day tendencies and 
methods in the teaching of the subject. It will be conducted 
in such a way as to show how arithmetic may be taught in 
terms of the country child's environment. 
Fall term. 

6. Rural Sociology, 

Rural Sociology makes a study of society as found in rural 
communities. J< aims to <\\i<\y ways in which community life 
m our farming section* maj be besl developed and carried 
on t hrough t lie cho< l a a social center. 






SPECIAL EDUCATION 195 



Rural Training School. 

The Stone School, located six miles from Ypsilanti on the D., 
J. A* C. electric line, is affiliated with the State Normal College and 
is taught by a member of its training school faculty. It is the demon- 
stration and training school of the Rural Education Department. 
There students observe the application of principles of teaching and 
management prior to their practice teaching. Students who are 
certificated from this department spend one-half of each school day 
for a term of twelve weeks in this school, devoting their time to 
practice teaching, obsei vation, and assisting the training teacher.' They 
are made responsible for the room while teaching and participate in 
all activities of the community in which the school has a part. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



DETROIT CENTER 

Associate Professor Chas. M. Elliott, Director 
Miss Lenore Conover Miss Fanny S. Fletcher 

Miss Gertrude Van Adestine Miss Clara B. Stoddard 

See page 87 for an outline of this curriculum. 

Foreseeing the need of teachers for special types of children who 
cannot get on under the usual grade conditions, the State Board of 
Education in 1914 offered a six weeks' course for training special teachers 
at the Michigan Home and Training School for the Feeble-Minded 
at Lapeer. It soon appeared to be desirable to ofjer such a course at 
the Normal College where general educational courses were also offered, 
consequently the work was transferred to the Michigan State Normal 
College in the summer of 1915. In the meantime there came a growing 
demand for special teachers of the blind, the deaf and the crippled. 
Clinical facilities for this type of work can be found only in the larger 
cities. No city in the country has made more extensive provision 
for the misfit child than has Detroit. It seemed desirable, therefore, 
to utilize the admirable facilities offered at Detroit and consequently 
on invitation of the Detroit school authorities the Michigan State 
Normal College 'establisht a center for the training of teachers of 
special education in connection with the Detroit Teachers' College. 



196 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

The State Normal College will continue to give the preliminary training 
necessary for entering upon this special work. It will also maintain as 
a part of the training school a room for subnormal children. This 
room will be utilized for observation and for laboratory purposes by 
the general classes in education. 

All persons who wish to equip themselves to teach any type of 
special class will hereafter enroll at the Detroit center. The course 
will cover one year of special training, credit for which will apply 
upon the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education 
issued by the Normal College. 

Only persons of intelligence and successful teaching experience 
should undertake the training and instruction of these classes. For 
that reason the entrance requirements to the course are placed high. 
Generally speaking, it is expected that candidates for entrance will 
have had at least two years beyond the high school; that is, a prep- 
aration equivalent to that of a graduate of a standard normal school. 
However, exceptions to this requirement will be made in the case of 
persons who have been expecially successful as teachers. But all 
candidates who have not had a norrnal school education or its equiv- 
alent should submit their recommendations and testimonials early, 
so that they may receive a reply before the opening of the fall term. 

1. The Hygiene of the School Child. 1 unit. 

The hygiene of the physical and mental growth of the child. 
The hygiene of posture, vision, hearing, nose and throat, speech 
and voice, etc. Preventive mentaL hygiene and the education 
of nervous children. The child is made the center of the 
hygienic studies throughout, rather than his physical surround- 
ings. 
Professor Elliott. 

2. Mental Deficiency. 1 unit. 

( Character and extent, of mental deficiency; its causes and preven- 
tion; physical mix! mental characteristics of mental defectives; 
different types and the possibility of their development; psy- 
chology of backward and defective children in relation to their 
training and instruction. Much opportunity will be given 
for observation of type cases, and clinical study of feeble-minded 
children. 
Professor Elliotl . 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 197 



3. Psychological Testing. 1 unit. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student practical 
experience, under supervision, in the use of psychological tests 
as a means of discovering the various mental levels among 
school children. A study will be made of both the individual 
and group methods of measuring intelligence. 
Professor Elliott. 

4. Juvenile Delinquency. 1 unit. 

A study of the relation of mentality to conduct among children 
of school age; insubordination, incorrigibility, truancy, and 
juvenile crime considered from the standpoint of their rela- 
tion to emotional instability, mental conflicts, and suppressed 
expericences. 
Professor Elliott. 

5. Heredity and Eugenics. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the more fundamental aspects of in- 
heritance with particular reference to man. It aims to present 
the biological facts and principles underlying the phenomena 
of heredity, and the more important results of modern work in 
the study of inheritance in plants, animals and the human 
species. It should serve as a basis of the critical understand- 
ing of the modern eugenics movement. 
Miss Conover. 

6. The Pathology of the Crippled Child. 1 unit. 

A study of the commonest diseases which cause crippled con- 
ditions, such as infantile paralysis, osteomyelitis, tuberculosis 
of the joints, etc. This course also includes sufficient training 
in anatomy that the student may understand the purpose and 
value of the work done in the muscle training clinic, and other 
forms of corrective work. 

7. Mechanism of the Ear. 1 unit. 

A study of the physiology of the ear and the process of hearing; 

causes of deafness; retardation of the hard-of-hearing child; 

testing of hearing, degree of hearing interpreted according 

to school-room standards to determine educational possibilities 

through this medium; auricular training to improve residual 

hearing. 

Miss Van Adestine. 



198 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

8. Science of the Elements of Speech. 1 unit. 

A course designed to show the development of speech from a 
physiological viewpoint; a study of the speech organs; their 
structure and use; development of consonants and vowels, 
their proper formation and resonance; rhythm and continuity 
of speech; how to diagram to illustrate speech formation; 
Belville Bell symbols of Visible Speech. 
Miss Van Adestine. 

9. Pedagogy for Teachers of the Deaf. 1 unit. 

Methods of adapting general pedagogy to the requirements of 
the deaf child; developing his language concept through object 
teaching, commands, action (Barry's Five Column Slate), 
stories, question and answer forms, composition, letter writing 
and reading. Lip reading development with 

(1) the beginner who has no knowledge of language, 

(2) the pupil who has become deaf after acquiring language. 
Miss Van Adestine. 

10. Blindness; Its Causes and Prevention. 1 unit. 

This course will cover in a general way the anatomy, physi- 
ology and hygiene of the eye. Cause of blindness and meas- 
ures leading to the elimination of such causes; special empha- 
sis on possibilities of the prevention of blindness, and on con- 
servation of sight. 
Miss Fletcher. 

1 1 . Special Pedagogy of the Blind and Partially-sighted. . 1 unit. 

Among topics considered will be the following: History of 
the Education of the Blind, Model School-room Equipment, 
[deal lighting conditions, economic and social aims in the edu- 
cation of the blind, special problems. This course will be 
closely correlated with observation and practice work in the 
classes for the blind and sighl conservation classes. 
Miss Fletcher. 

\2. Stammering and Cognate Defects. I unit. 

This course, with the two following, is designed to train teach- 

uho wish to specialize in the correction of speech defects. 

The medical, psychological, and remedial aspects are covered. 

Lectures upon the causes of these defects, and upon the theories 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 199 



advanced by prominent authorities concerning them and a 
system for their correction, will be given. A speech clinic, for 
practice work, will be maintained throughtout the entire course. 
Miss Stoddard. 

13. Defective Speech. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the classification and correction of 
Lisping, Burring, Lalling, Defective Phonation, Infantile 
Speech, Nasality, Foreign Accent, Aphonia, and Hoarse Voice. 
Special attention is given to the anatomy of the speech mech- 
anism, obstructions in nose and throat, tongue-tie, hare lip, 
cleft palate, teeth malformations and resultant speech, with 
clinic demonstration. 
Miss Stoddard. 

14. Phonetics and Voice. 1 unit. 

This course gives lectures upon the formation and develop- 
ment of the elementary English sounds, the normal voice, and 
the voice in neurology. The diagnosis of speech defects; cor- 
rective physical, oral and vocal gymnastics; speech tests for 
mentality; and a system for recording and tabulating will be 
fully explained and illustrated. 
Miss Stoddard. 



Training Department 

Dimon H. Roberts, A. M., Superintendent. 
Frederick M. Greenstreet, A. B., S. T. B., Principal of High School. 

For list of training instructors, see page 20. 

PURPOSE AND PLAN 

The leading purpose of this school is to afford an opportunity 
to the student for both observation and practical work in the school- 
room. It is here that theory and practice meet, and consequently 
the work of this department should test in a very large measure the 
ability of the teacher to do successful work in the public schools of the 
state. As far as possible the aim is to make the school fulfill a double 
function in being both a model and a training school. An attempt 
is made to keep abreast of the times in all that pertains to the interests 
of the children who constitute the school. Special attention is given to 
planning and execution, the keeping of school records, and the general 
management of the grade room. All work is done under the general 
direction of the superintendent, who is the executive of the department. 

The course of study is continuous thru kindergarten, primary, 
intermediate and grammar grades, and the four years of high school. 

While the school was establisht primarily for the purpose of training 
teachers, yet the principle is maintained that the interests of the pupils 
are the most important consideration; and it is believed that whatever 
advances the well-being of the child best serves the purpose for which 
the Bchool was treated. 

The pupils enrolled come from the city and surrounding country. 
Tuition is free to -ill, and the school is gradually working toward the 
free text-book system. At present nearly all supplies are furnisht 
in the lower grades; and in the higher grades pupils are required to 
furnish only such books as represent tin; more formal work. 

All applications for admission of new pupils should be made at 
the office of the superintendent, Those, entering from other schools 
will facilitate matters by bringing with them Letters of transfer, re- 
cords, or promotion cards. On account of Ike large demand far ad- 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 201 

mission, only children of normal age for the various grades can be admitted. 
Children are admitted to the kindergarten between the ages of 
four and six years, but may not be admitted to the first grade before 
the age of six. Promotion will take place regularly three times a year 
at the opening of each school term, thus making it possible to begin 
the work of a grade in September, January and April. By this plan 
the system of promotion is made more flexible, inasmuch as each 
grade contains three sections separated from one another in time by 
one-third of the school year. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

All work in observation and student teaching must be done during 
the second year of the life certificate course, except in the case of those 
who are to take the limited certificate. Under the latter condition the 
Training Department practice and observation may be made a part 
of the last full term's work. 

Under the present arrangement of the college year the teaching 
terms will be the fall, the winter, and the spring. Carefully note the 
following: 

1. All students must have completed the courses in Education 
1, 2, and 3 before entering upon the work of this department. 

2. At least three of the fundamental teachers' courses in the 
common branches must be successfully past, and all conditions and 
failures in academic or professional subjects vital to success must be 
removed before students are admitted for observation' or teaching in the 
Training Department. 

3. Students are not permitted to take more than two subjects 
in college in addition to the regular training work without permission 
from the committee on extra subjects. 

4. The number of student teachers doing work in the depart- 
ment during any one quarter will be limited approximately to one-third 
the membership of the senior class. 

5. The amount of teaching and observation required will be 
one hundred minutes per day, during one term. The regular work 
in this department counts the same as two academic subjects and is entitled 
to as much time for outside preparation. 

6. All assignments for work in the training department and changes 
in the same are made by the superintendent; 



202 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

7. By special arrangement with the superintendent and the head 
of the college department concerned students may elect one-half of 
their teaching in the department in which they are specializing. 

8. All students classifying for work in this department must 
reserve the hour from 3 to 4 for conference with the training teacher. 

9. The work in the Training Department consists of teaching, 
observation, making subject and lesson plans, assisting the training 
teachers in various ways, making written reports, attending confer- 
ences and general meetings, and becoming familiar with the course of 
study and workings of the school. 

HOURS FOR TEACHING 

The hours in the Training Department are from 8:30 to 11 for 
the kindergarten, and first four grades; from 8:30 to 11:30 for the 
other grades; and from 8:00 to 11:00 for the high school. In the 
afternoon all grades except the kindergarten are in session from 1:00 
to 3:00. The half -hours before 9:00 and after 11:00 o'clock in the 
elementary grades so far as possible are reserved for training teachers. 

SUBJECT PLANS 

In order that the work in the department may be systematically 
planned and executed, the student teacher is required to make and 
submit subject plans based upon the scope or extent of the material 
included in the general notion involved. 

The training teacher will direct the time and manner for their use. 

LESSON PLANS 

For more specific work of daily recitations, carefully prepare! 
lesson plans in accordance with the general spirit of the natural steps 
of instruction are required from each student teacher. 

OBSERVATION 

<-f the most important features of the work in this depart! 
tnenl i the observation of the method and management of the school- 
room. Carefully prepared outlines are placed in the hands of the 
student teacher as •■' basis for Buch observation. These outlines deal 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 203 

with the mechanical management of a grade and practical schoolroom 
psychology and child study. 

As occasion offers, a carefully planned illustrative lesson is con- 
ducted by each training teacher in the presence of the student teachers 
of the grade. A plan is placed before the student teachers, and the 
criticism period of that day is devoted to a discussion of the plan, the 
method employed, and results attained. 

TRAINING TEACHERS 

Each training teacher in the Elementary School has charge of a 
grade, devotes a part of her time to the teaching of the same, super- 
vises the work of the student teachers, and observes and makes needed 
reports to the superintendent of the department. 

The amount of teaching done by the training teacher varies as 
the interest and work of the school demand her personal efforts. For 
fcwa weeks at the opening of each term, the instruction is mostly in 
her hands. She is expected to take charge of one or more classes each 
day for the benefit of such teachers as most need her assistance. We 
believe most decidedly in the value of model teaching by those who 
are fully prepared for such work both by training and experience. 

The training teacher has immediate charge of all the work of the 
student teachers in directing the making of subject and lesson plans, 
the work of observation, the writing of reports based on observa- 
tions in the schoolroom, and the execution of plans. She meets her 
student teachers three times each week at three o'clock for the purpose 
of reviewing the work of the day, examining lesson plans, instructing 
in method, and hearing and discussing reports of observations in child 
study. 

HONOR TEACHING 

At the close of each term's work, the training teacher of each grade 
may choose from the student teachers who have been working with 
her. the one who has shown herself the most efficient from the stand- 
point of scholarship, teaching ability, and general power in school 
management to act as her assistant during the succeeding term. No 
one shall be selected for this honor, whose scholarship record falls below 
M C." The student so selected shall be called the honor teacher and 
the work done may be substituted for one of the required teachers' 
courses. Honor teachers are expected to give two hours each day to 



204 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

the work in the grade for which they have been chosen. The giving 
of model lessons, helping in the details of schoolroom management and 
assisting in the critic work constitute some of the duties. 

SCHOOL EXERCISES 

Chapel exercises are held regularly on Friday morning of each 
week in the Training Department assembly hall. These exercises 
consist of a simple devotional program, supplemented each time with 
music and dramatizations by the children from one or more of the grades. 

Special programs appropriate to the occasion are given at Thanks- 
giving, Christmas, Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, and at 
the close of the school year. 

All of these exercises are public, and patrons and friends of the 
school are cordially invited to attend. Student teachers are especially 
welcome and are invited to join the children in the devotional part of 
the program. 

THE COURSES OF STUDY 

Suggestive outlines of work in English, nature study, history, 
geography, arithmetic, music, drawing, physical training, manual 
training and domestic science are followed in all grades of the depart- 
ment. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

The High School is a part of the Training Department and serves 
also as a coMege preparatory department. There are the usual en- 
trance requirements including the satisfactory completion of the 
work of the eight grades. Students who have completed a part of the 
course in an accepted high school will receive credit for such work. 
Those entering from other high schools, will receive credit upon ex- 
amination or alter classification on trial in suitable courses, at the 
discretion of the Principal. 

The course of study falls into three divisions or curricula, spec- 
ified ai A, B, and O. The students who expect to enter the literary 
or general course of any college or university will take curriculum 
A, those wishing to take a scientific or engineering course will pursue 

Curriculum l> and those who do not, expect to enter college may pursue 

the < outlined under curriculum C, Students who wish to 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 205 

take a language course will pursue curriculum A, electing two addi- 
tional years of foreign language. In curriculum A two years of history 
must be taken. In curriculum C there are required besides the specified 
English two units in each of two different subjects. For students 
who expect to enter the Normal College we recommend a minimum of 
three years of English, two years of mathematics, two years of history, 
and two years of science. 

A special course in agriculture conforming to the Smith-Hughes 
plan is offered to students desiring to pursue such a course. This 
course includes: first year, agricultural botany, mechanical drawing 
(farm tools), manual training- (farm tools); second year, farm crops 
and horticulture; third year, animal husbandry; fourth year, farm 
mechanics, farm management, and soils. On account of the large 
number of electives this course can be readily adapted to curriculum C. 

A student should carry four subjects. If a student shows himself 
capable of doing so he will be allowed to take an additional subject. 
An)- student may elect to take physical training or chorus. Physical 
training pursued four hours per week for one year counts as one-third 
unit. Chorus pursued two hours per week for one year counts as one- 
fourth unit. A maximum of one unit in physical training and chorus 
may be counted toward graduation in any curriculum. 

Students pursuing curriculum C may secure a maximum of one 
unit in music when the work is taken under the direction of a teacher 
accredited by the school. A student must practice a minimum of 
one hour per day and receive one lesson each week. One year's work 
in music will count as one credit. Music will not be counted to- 
ward college entrance requirements. 

Each student should choose the curriculum he will follow and 
the electives he will take only after consultation with the principal. 

One subject pursued for twelve weeks gives one credit. Three 
credits equal one unit. Sixteen units are required for graduation. 



20(5 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



CURRICULUM OF STUDIES 





PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 




A 


B 




C 


IX. 


IX. 




IX. 


English 
Algebra 
For. Lang. 
Gen. Sci., Hist. 
Man. Art. 


English 
Algebra 
For. Lang, 
or Botany or 

Man. Arts 


English 
Math. 
Science 
Elective 




X. 


X. 




X. 


English 

Geometry 
For. Lang. 
Elective 


English 
Geometry 
For. Lang. 
Zoology or 

Man. Arts 


English 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 




XI. 


XI. 




XI. 


English 

U. 8. Hist. & Civics 

Elective 

Elective 


English 

Chemistry 

Alg. & Solid Geom. 

Elective 


English 

U. S. Hist. & Civics 

Elective 

Elective 


XII. 


XII. 




XII. 


English 

Physics or Chem. 

Elective 

Elective 


Physics 

U. S. Hist. & Civics 

Elective 

Elective 


English 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 





Latin 

French 
Agriculture 

,-h 

Zooloj 

I Jig 

Dom. An 
Dom 

Tr. 



ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

B 



C 
IX. 

Dom. Art 

Dom. Sri. 

Man. Tr. 

Agriculture 

History 

For. Language 

X. 

Dom, Art 
I )om. Sci. 

Man. Tr. 

Agricuture 

History 

Math. 

For. Language 

I'.ot or Zooi. 



DIRECTORY FOR 1921-1922 



207 



xr. 



XL 



Latin 

French 

Derman 

Spanisli 
Chem. 
Dom. Art 
Dom. Sci. 
■an. Tr. 



Drawing 
History 
For. Lang. 
Dom. Art 
Dom. Sci. 
Man. Tr. 
Geog. 



XI. 

For. Language 
Dom. Art 
Dom. Sci. 
Man. Tr. 
Agric. 
Math. 
Drawing 
Pub. Speaking 
Geog. 
Chem. 



XII. 

Latin 

French 

German 

Econ. Sz Sociol. 



XII. 

Adv. Math. 

English 

Econ. & Sociol. 

Man. Tr. 

Foreign Language 



XII. 

Econ. & Sociol. 
For. Language 
Math. 
Dom. Sci. 
Man. Tr. 
Agriculture 
Physics 
Dom. Art 



STUDENTS 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Ableson, Camilla Ypsilanti 

Ableson, Guy Ypsilanti 

Acker, Evelyn Marguerite Chelsea 

Alban, Lloyd Ypsilanti 

Allison, Paul C Ypsilanti 

Arnold, Charles B Ypsilanti 

Arnold, Seth Ypsilanti 

Augustus, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Beebe, Olive . Ypsilanti 

Biddle, Aileen Ypsilanti 

Biddle, Dale Ypsilanti 

Biddle, Maiian Ypsilanti 

Beuschlein, Lenora Ypsilanti 

Block, Clarence Ypsilanti 

Blossey, Selma . . •. Ypsilanti 

Brinker, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Brown, Francis Ypsilanti 

Burr, Irving Whitney .Ypsilanti 

Burrell, James H Ypsilanti 

Campbell, Edward D Ypsilanti 

Campbell, Iva Ypsilanti 

Carl, Mrs. Abbie Bird Ypsilanti 

( 'arson, Bernard Coldwater 

( tarter, Harold B '. Ypsilanti 

( .'isli, Ruby .Ypsilanti 

( lark, Arlene Ypsilanti 

( kmant, Berberl Ypsilanti 

( look, Paul Ypsilanti 

Darling, Theodore N Ypsilanti 

Davis, Bessie Ypsilanti 

Davis, Irene Ypsilanti 

Dicks, Gilbert Ypsilanti 

I Hcks, Floyd Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 209 



Dingeldy, Clara Plymouth 

Drake, Fannie Ypsilanti 

Egget, Clara Ypsilanti 

Elder, Charles Ypsilanti 

Elfvin, Henry H Ann Arbor 

Farrish, Byron Ypsilanti 

Farrish, Ethel Ypsilanti 

Farrish, Glen Ypsilanti 

Felt, Frances Ypsilanti 

Fisk, Marjory E Ypsilanti 

Foerster, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Fogarty, Edward Ypsilanti 

Foster, Dwight > Ypsilanti 

Foster, Marian Ypsilanti 

Freeman, Josephine Ypsilanti 

Fuller, Ronald Ypsilanti 

Gee, Florence M Ypsilanti 

Gleason, Ellen -. Emmet 

Gleason, Thomas Emmet 

Glover, Paul O Ypsilanti 

Gotts, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Gourley, William Ypsilanti 

Gough, Willard Yale 

Grant, Margaret Sault Ste. Marie 

Guinan, Catherine Ypsilanti 

Hankinson, Beulah Ypsilanti 

Hankinson, Lucile Ypsilanti 

Harris, Augusta Flint 

Harris, Muriel Ypsilanti 

Hatch, Robert Ypsilanti 

Hatch, William Ypsilanti 

Hathaway, Carol Ypsilanti 

Hawkins, Ethel K Ypsilanti 

Hebblewhite, Marshall , . Ypsilanti 

Heyman, Edward Port Sanilac 

Hiscock, Gertrude Ypsilanti 

Hixson, Fred Downing . Ann Arbor 

Hoxie, Jefferson Ypsilanti 

Hultine, Edwin A Ann Arbor 

27 



210 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hurst, Henry Ypsilanti 

Hurst, Laura • Ypsilanti 

Huston, Karl Ypsilanti 

Irving, Lucile Ypsilanti 

Kurr, Emerson J Ypsilanti 

Ladner, Muriel Ypsilanti 

Landy, Maurice W Ann Arbor 

Lang, Carl F Ann Arbor 

Leo, Lewis J Ann Arbor 

Lidke, George Ypsilanti 

Lister, Frances M Ypsilanti 

Lovell Lucy Ypsilanti 

Lustfield, Walter Ypsilanti 

Marsh, Martha Ypsilanti 

MacKellar, Lois Ypsilanti 

McCraight, Maud Ypsilanti 

McGreevy, Anna Sylvina Detroit 

McKenna, Loren Ypsilanti 

McKenny, Marion L Ypsilanti 

McLouth, Bruce Ypsilanti 

Meyers, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Moore, Nina Ypsilanti 

Moore, W. C Ypsilanti 

Moriis, Willard Ypsilanti 

Mot!, Marian R Ypsilanti 

Mott, Maynard C Ypsilanti 

Mullen, Georgianna Ypsilanti 

Mullen, James Ypsilanti 

Muller, Pauline Ypsilanti 

Muller, Ruth B Ypsilanti 

Mumford, Flora Ypsilanti 

Mm ise Ypsilanti 

levada E. Liverpool, 0. 

ion, Geraldine Ypsilanti 

Nbrdman, Prank B Ypsilanti 

Noble, Martha Farmington 

\nn;i Galesburg, III. 

Olmstead, Lowell Ypsilanti 

Palmer, Glenn B Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 211 



Peet, Gilbert B : Ypsilanti 

Feet, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Peterson, Laurel Alanson 

Putney, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Quinell, Charles Ypsilanti 

Rail, Florence M Ypsilanti 

Reid, Florence G Ypsilanti 

Richards, Pauline J Moscow 

Hooker, Ada Lee Ypsilanti 

Ross, Paul L Ypsilanti 

Rowe, Arloa Ypsilanti 

Rowe, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Rowe, Milton S v Ypsilanti 

Hubert, Gladys Ann Arbor 

Schlicht, Edna Ypsilanti 

Sharp, Lester Merle Howell 

Shawley, Laura Ypsilanti 

Smith, Ralph Ypsilanti 

Smith, William H Ypsilanti 

Snarcy, Claude Jackson 

Spence, William Ypsilanti 

Steere, Dorothy Ann Arbor 

Sturton,. Allen Ypsilanti 

Taber, Carmen Ypsilanti 

Thayer, Ralph Ypsilanti 

Titus, Manley Ypsilanti 

Trimble, Eloise Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, Glen . . . . • Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, Louis Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, James Ypsilanti 

Van Every, Willard Ypsilanti 

Voorhees. Maxwell Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Allison Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Georgina , Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Samuel Ypsilanti 

Walters, Lloyd Ypsilanti 

Webb, Bernard Ypsilanti 

^Ycbb, James Ypsilanti 

Wells, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 



212 x NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Weidman, Harold * Ypsilanti 

Wilson, Warren Ypsilanti 

Willard, Jeanette Ypsilanti 

Winsor, Grace E Ypsilanti 

Winsor, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Yeatman, William H Ypsilanti 

Yeckley, John Ypsilanti 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 



FIRST YEAR 

Abbaduska, Florence L Waldron 

Adams, Florence Morrice 

Adams, Gretta Mae Carson City 

Alban, Dorothy M . . , Belleville 

Albertson, Mrs. Aileen Oxford 

Allan, Jean A Holly 

Amos, Isabel H Bad Axe 

Amos, Mildred Bad Axe 

Anderson, Anna Onekama 

Anderson, Stanley E Birmingham 

Andrews Neva Rochester 

Andrus, Ellen Utica 

Andrus, Sarah R Utica 

Angle, Elgie Jayne Almont 

Appleby, Mary ( Catherine Saginaw 

Arbaugh, William A Highland Park 

Arbogast, Mary K Coral 

Arms, Esther E Gaines 

Armstrong, Caryl Toledo, Ohio 

Armstrong, Edna Highland 

Arnold, Belen E Standish 

Atkins, Ora i> Fowlervillc 

Auckland, Edith Grosse Pointe Farms 

Austin, Burley Dundee 

Bacon. Ruth St. Louis 



STUDENTS 213 



Bade, Grace B Romeo 

Bamber, Ethel M Howell 

Banwell, Mrs. Yolande Ypsilanti 

Barnes, Marion T Ypsilanti 

Barton, Kathryn Grand Rapids 

Bass, Lillian , Ypsilanti 

Bates, Beulah M . . . New Haven 

Baum, Lucile A Wixom 

Beach, Walter Clinton 

Beal, Verneita E Detroit 

Bcardsley, Marion N Edwardsburg 

Beck, Herman Sebewaing 

Bell, Gwyneth St. Ignace 

Bell, Ileta May Fowlerville 

Bell, Winnief erd L Fowlerville 

Bemis, Vyrene Temperance 

Benedict, Kathaleen Charlotte 

Benjamin, Hazel E Fowlerville 

Bennett, Berenice Laingsburg 

Benson, Helen M St. Ignace 

Bergin, Fred Ypsilanti 

Bittrich, Elsa T Lake Linden 

Blackmer, Edwyna J Milan 

Blair, Charles H . . . . .- Parma 

Blair, Gladys . Owosso 

Blakeslee, F. Russell Ypsilanti 

Bloom, Catherine ' Maple City 

Boden, Annetta : .St. Clair 

Boer, Catherine Lucille Grand Rapids 

Boland, Mrs. Olive Ypsilanti 

Bombenek, Wilhelmina , Ypsilanti 

Bonner, Grace E St. James 

Boss, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Boss, Nellie Memphis 

Bouldrey, Marion Concord 

Bovee, Fern Clayton 

Bowcn, Claribel Ypsilanti 

Bowen, Jennie E . . . Howard City 

Bradfield, Gladys Evelyn Grand Rapids 



21-1 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAH BOOK 

Bradley, Mary E Port Huron 

Bragg, Marguerite . Adrian 

Braidwood, Christine M Almont 

Brainerd, Gladys Coldwatei 

Brode, Geraldine Bay City 

Brower, Velma Seneca 

Brown, Ida C Blanchard 

Brown, Marion L Grand Ledge 

Brydges, Marian L Bailey 

Bullen, Cordelia Mason 

Bunda, Meryl Berville 

Bunn, Orpha L New Hudson 

Burgmann, Glenn Elkton 

Burkhardt, Lorene Lima, Ohio 

Burrell, Gertrude Irvena Ypsilanti 

Burrell, Paul Ypsilanti 

Burt, Dorothy E Laingsburg 

Burt, Mar}^ Helen Meader Ann Arbor 

Busk, Alpha Greenville 

Butler, George Grand Rapids 

Butler, Lorraine I Milan 

Butt, Martha Elizabeth Eckford 

Campbell, Agnes Onsted 

Campbell, Hazel M Owosso 

Campbell, Luella Gaylord 

( '; nnon, Grace M Ann Arbor 

( Jarpenter, Audrey Frances. . .- Ypsilanti 

( Jarpenter, ( ribson M Northville 

Carr, Harriet! Ypsilanti 

Bernice M Benzonia 

( lattermole, Ruth E Ypsilanti 

Chubb, Helen C Howell 

Clark, Loretta E Whitehall 

Clark ' Bristol, Ind. 

( liffe, Joy M . ( 'arson City 

Clifford, Phyllis Ypsilanti 

( lochran, Medora M . Horton 

( < mfoi I Elizabeth R Tocumseh 

( !onnolly, Leota E Biga 






STUDENTS 215 

Converse, Arm in a v Ypsilanti 

Cook, Irene ' Ovid 

( Joon, Irene M Jonesville 

Cooney, Ralph M Ypsilanti 

Cooper, Lula E.N Alma 

Cosgrove, Mrs. E. C Baraga 

Corson, Bernard L Coldwater 

Costello, Helen Lansing 

Cottrell, Margaret Marine City 

Crane, Elsie M Portland 

Crane, Ina E Adrian 

Craw, Elizabeth L . . Petoskey 

Crockett, Alma L Blissfield 

Croninger, Ethelyn Grand Rapids 

Crouter, Jennie E Charlevoix 

Cummiskey, Maggie .- Fowlerville 

Curtis, Florence Louise Muskegon Heights 

Curtiss, Floyd A * Ypsilanti 

Dauer, Lydia Blissfield 

Daugherty, Esther E Kokomo, Ind. 

Davis, Florria Ypsilanti 

Davis, Laura Flushing 

Dawdy, Lena H Portland 

Dawson, LaReign Owosso 

Deakin, Perry . . . Detroit 

Demarois, Eleanor Calumet 

Dent el, Freeman L , , Ida 

Dernberger Beulah Dryden 

Dixon, Irving Denton 

Donaldson, Winifred Highland Park 

Dowling, Loretta Owosso 

Driggett, George E Charlevoix 

Duffey, Ruby Sunfield 

Ealy, Eleanor M Ypsilanti 

Easlick, Hilda B Milan 

Edgerton, Harris D . Petoskey 

Egler, Iva R Freesoil 

Eilers, Marguerite A Montague 

Eisenbeiser, Eleanor ■ Chelsea 



216 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Elder, Jane Ypsilanti 

Elfvin, Henry H ." Ann Arbor 

Elliott, Evelyn Frances Saginaw 

Elliott, Ferris G Highland Park 

Emery, Fern M Ypsilanti 

Ensing, Harold Connersville, Ind. 

Erickson, Melvin N Whitehall 

Eskildsen, M. Alice Manistee 

Evans, Eleanor Millington 

Evans, Eva Helen Lansing 

Everill, Winifred Algonac 

Exelby, Allura Elizabeth Detroit 

Exner, Gladys Man ton 

Fair, Gertrude Orion 

Farley, Bernice Yale 

Farrell, Jerome V Detroit 

Farwell, Frances E Barryton 

Fay, Elmer D \ Holt 

Feldkamp, Hulda M Manchester 

Ferenz, John Flint 

Field, Olive A Milford 

Fisher, Helen Greenville 

Fisk, Kleo Traverse City 

Foley, Gertrude Luzerne 

Ford, Richard Ypsilanti 

Forester, Gertrude L . Escanaba 

Forsythe, Helen M Milan 

Fox, Martha Rose Morenci 

Fox, Rachael Blanche Fowler 

Prank, Doris Ann Arbor 

Franklin, Earl P Detroit 

Praser, Eilma A Detroit 

Friesch, Anna L Calumet 

Frost, Estella B Saranac 

Gallaway, ( hrace Waltz 

Gardner, Margaret N Oscoda 

Garland, Margaret Howell 

tardo, Minnie M Calumet 

Gates, Harriel A Bay City 



STUDENTS 217 



Gates, Ivo R Chelsea 

Gatz, Amy Bridgeport 

Gaut, Bernice Vermontville 

Gillmore, Donovan G Big Rapids 

Goff , Florence J Montrose 

Goodrich, Idamae Pontiac 

Goodrich, Thelma Irene Grand^Rapids 

Goold, Hattie Margaret Onondaga 

Gorman, Nettie M Saginaw 

Gorsuch, Doris Florence Hudson 

Gorton, Eugene L Ypsilanti 

Gothiea, Adelaide S Plymouth 

Graham, Leona M Deckerville 

Griffin, Catherine M Howell 

Griner, Hazel Vermontville 

Gritzner, Olivia Dorothy Montague 

Gunnison, Verna . . .Owosso 

Hackman, Florence A Kingsley 

Haft, Edna M . .Saginaw 

Hagerman, Marie Hillsdale 

Halladay, Eleanor Huron, Ohio 

Haller, E. Leone Michigan City, Ind. 

Hamilton, Ruth M Ludington 

Hanham, Homer Tecumseh 

Hapke, Bernice Marian St. Joseph 

Harju, Alma Osceola 

Harmon, Gladys - Wixom 

Harr, Rella Evelyn Munith 

Harry, Beatrice C Lapeer 

Hart, Sybil Flushing 

Hartzell, Helen Louise Sebring, Ohio 

Hath, Nora Flint 

EEathaway, Althea Byron 

Hathaway, Melvin E Ypsilanti 

layward, Nora Middleville 

leath, Craig Milan 

leath, Marjorie L Richmond 

leath, Ruth Monroe 

lebblewhite, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 



218 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Herring, Flossie M Litchfield 

Hertzberg, Myrtle . Ypsilanti 

Hicks, Renabel V Richland 

Higgins, Frances S Ypsilanti 

Hiller, Ola B. Almont 

Hillmer, Gertrude B Plymouth 

Hillyard, Effie L Hillsdale 

Hitchingham, Bertha E Milan 

Hoag, Irene L Sparta 

Hofelich, Hilda Fremont, Ohio 

Hoffman, Bruce A Brown City 

Holbrook, Donald Dry den 

Holmes, Donald Flint 

Holmquist, Edwin Jennings 

Honigh, Mrs. Ada M Pontiac 

Hopper, Evelyn E Vermontville 

Hough, Agnes Margaret Flint 

Howard, Eva B East Jordan 

Howe, Madeline ' Flint 

Howlett, Dorothy L : Mason 

Hultine, Edwin A Ann Arbor 

Hungerfoid, Richard Concord 

Hurdley, Helen Louise Ypsilanti 

Hurlbert, Dorotha Detroit 

Hurley, Margaret J Cass Cit> 

1 [urrell, Delos Owossq 

Hurrell, Mildred E Owossc 

Hutchinson, Ruth A Waterville, Ohk 

Hut ion, Catherine Ypsilant 

[ngallSj Nellie Charlevoi? 

[sbister, Bessie Port lluroi 

Jackson, Carol Detroi 

Jackson, Warren L Algona< 

.Inn-. B( ii Boyue Falli 

Janney, Ruth A I)unde« 

Jefferson, II. W Ypsilant 

Jt asop, Ellice Williamstoj' 

Johnson, Ester A Beed ("it; 

Johnson, Mabel Pontia 



STUDENTS 219 



Johnson, Muriel A Chief 

Jones, Annabella E Lake Linden 

. t roes, A. Lloyd Vernon 

Jorginsen, Mae Inkster 

Kaiser, Clara ' Redridge 

Kangas, Mayme H Calumet 

Kaulitz, Raymond Owosso 

Keillor, Grace M Elkton 

Keith, Nettie S Scottville 

Kelley, Georgia E . .' Highland 

Kernen, Arlene Ithaca 

Kerr, Katherine I Springfield, 111. 

Kerr, Margaret E Birch Run 

Kidney, Gertrude E Brant 

Kilburn, Vera Reading 

Kimmel, Edna St. Johns 

Klemmer, Harvey J St. Clair 

Knappertz, Esther Canton, Ohio 

Knight, Lester Laingsburg 

Knight, Rhoda R Trenton 

Koning, Meta Fennville 

Krasniek, Ida Holly 

Kreger, Lucile Wyandotte 

Kriekard, Jeannette Grand Rapids 

Krupp, Frank Smyrna 

vurimo, Ina E Mohawk 

adwig, Marguerite St. Joseph 

agesen, Esther Pentwater 

lancaster, Pearl L Oden 

andy, Marion Katherine Ann Arbor 

ang, Carl F Ann Arbor 

-aPorte, Alice J Hastings 

-arson, Florence Manistee 

^ascelle, Loy B Crystal 

<eo, Lewis J Ann Arbor 

■ester, Meredith Marine City 

^evasseur, Beatrice E Bay City 

jewis, Alonzo Addison 

Ais, Ilah Almont 



220 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAK BOOK 



Linabury, Emma H. . . . Metamora| 

Linck, Mildred Brown City I 

Lindsay, Eva Ypsilanti^ 

Lindsley, Marian A EscanabaJ 

Liverance, Ilah L WilliamstonJ 

Lord, Alberta M Stockbridge 

Lord, Edna C Ypsilanti; 

Lowe, Lucille BrittorJ 

Lowrey, Mable B Clarksville 

Ludington, Samuel G Yale 

Lynch, Agatha. Gaylord 

Mackan, Burthol C Milan ; 

Mahaffy, Beatrice M Marlette 

Maher, Katherine Toledo, Ohio \ 

Malenfant, Beatrice L Cheboygan 

Manchester, Nola Ypsilanti j 

Mark, Harriett E McMillan 

Martin, Dorothy Britton 

Martin, Lucille Marie Williamston j 

Martin, Oma Lucille • • Newark, Ohio j 

Martin, Rena Bay City 

Matheison, Neil D Jeddo 

Matson, Violet M Baraga 

Matthews, Mary Hancock 

Maxwell, Margaret Sault Ste. Marie! 

McCarbery, Lelah M Ridgewayl 

McCloskey, Helen Chelseal 

McClure, Linda • . .Sandusky 

McCool, Marian W Traverse Cityj 

McCarth; James Stuart .Grand Rapids j 

McCumons, Alberta G Brown Cityj 

Macdonald, Eudora (J Saginaw j 

McElhenie, Leah Concord j 

McGce, Jean Pontiacl 

McGregor, Margarel E Reading! 

Mclntyre, Mildred M Adrianij 

McKnight, Elarold J Saginaw! 

McKnight, Lrwiii Saginawj 

McLean, Helen Hamilton Cheboygan! 



STUDENTS 221 



McNeil, Marion Crystal Falls 

McNulty, Mary Beth . Cleveland, Ohio 

MacQueen, Beatrice Wellsville, Ohio 

Mock, C. Mabel McBain 

Meier, Lorena Wyandotte 

Mensen, Edna Algonac 

Millard, Helen Mary Farmington 

Miller, Alton K South Lyons 

Miller, Dorothy Romeo 

Miller, Florine C Dundee 

Mills, Mary Esther Fremont 

Mintz, Martha Dundee 

Misner, Paul J Otisville 

Mockler, Nola B Archbold, Ohio 

Moc, Emma M Elk Rapids 

Moine, Donna Waldron 

Mollhagen, Mildred M St. Joseph 

Monk, Esther Dundee 

Moon, Dora Alice Muskegon 

Moore, James W Ypsilanti 

Moore, June Flint 

Moore, E. Lyle Carson City 

Moore, Mary Montrose 

Moorman, Miriam E Ypsilanti 

Morris, John E Saline 

Morrow, Gladys F Algonac 

Morton, Alice May Muskegon Heights 

Morton, Edith A Ann Arbor 

Moshier, Margaret Oxford 

:Mox, Etta Kingsley 

IMurdock, Chas. F Detroit 

Murray, Margarette Coldwater 

Myers, Ford W Owosso 

Xelson, Freda L Dollarville 

.Seville, Catherene Woodville 

Nichols, Nympha D Homer 

Nichols Rolland E Reading 

sissle, Mabel M Ann Arbor 

kofzinger, Marian E Archbold, Ohio 



222 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK - 

Nye, Maxine Pittsford 

O'Connell, Esther M Montague 

Otto, Norman Suttons Bay J 

Owen, Edys E - East Tawas j 

Owen, Rothwell Ypsilanti 

Palmer, Marie Plymouth 

Parker, Eliza B Brooklyn 

Parker, Florence C Blissfield 

Parker, Olga G Chicago, 111. 

Parmenter, Genevieve C Northville 

Pasch, Erna Marie St. Johns 

Patterson, Mildred A Yale 

Patton, Beth Harbor Springs 

Pear, E. Aldean Saugatuck 

Pearson, Lydia M Muskegon 

Pepple, Dorothy : St. Louis 

Perry, Iona Lansing 

Peters, Ethel C Brooklyn 

Pfannenschmidt, Irene Traverse City 

Pickell, Dorothy G Cement City 

Pierce, Grace Florence Ann Arbor 

Poast, A. Mabel Toledo, Ohio 

Porter, Lucia Anita Wayne i 

Potter, Nellie L Ovid * 

Prey, Nina M Capac 

Prudery Irene M Charlotte 

Pullen, Ruth M ' Belleville j 

Purcell, Ruby Ardelia Deckcrville 

Purcey, Irene Fremont 

Putney, Pettrina Arcadia 

Quance Hazel St. Ignace 

Quigley, Ellen Marie Sistcrsville, W. Va. 

Quinlan, Margaret Carsonville 

Racette, Florence Mae Muskegon 

Rathbun, Marie Lyons, Ohio 

Sybil Ellen Concord \ 

Reavie, Thelma St. Ignace 

Reid, Alice Ypsilanti 

Reimann, Donald M Ypsilanti ' 



STUDENTS 223 

ice, Lurline ' Petoskey 

ichards, Ina I South Lyon 

ichardson, Hallie B Dundee 

ichardson, Olive Napoleon 

ichardson, Samuel A Ypsilanti 

iggs, Newell Holden Wayne 

inn, Eloise St. Clair 

oberts, Lillie Ithaca 

obertson, Burtis L Flint 

ofeertson, Gwenola Jean . .Flint 

obison, Lucille Saline 

obson, Janet Ypsilanti 

oe, Ernestine Plymouth 

jgers, Maurice V Ypsilanti 

3hlf, Madeline Saline 

)ot, Harriett D t Prattville 

>ss, AUce K Owosso 

)ss, Donald M Ypsilanti 

iffier, Maxine E , Saginaw 

.man, Lillian Saginaw 

ckett, Nina Ithaca 

ltsgiver, Mildred A Grand Rapids 

mpson, Alice M Moorland 

ionuelson, Marie E East Tawas 

neider, Karl M Tecumseh 

uberth, Mary Oletta Port Huron 

uknecht, Christina Corunna 

ruler, Ada C Dundee 

iweinsberg, Carola M Bay City 

winck. Esther Saginaw 

tt, Frank F Ypsilanti 

tt, Joe Romulus 

burger, Carolyn M.J Riga 

burger, Katheryn A Riga 

>y, Florence North Star 

rman, Blanche Evart 

rman, Ruth Brewster Cassopolis 

tka, Grace E Belleville 

:els, Fred R Flint 



224 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Siglin, Marguerite D East Tawas 

Sill, Margaret E Traverse City 

Simmons Evelyn Richmond 

Simpson, Alexander. Litchfield 

Sisson, Isabel Central Lake 

Skarvi, Bertha Bessemei 

Smith, Frances. Detroil 

Smith, GladysM Ypsilant 

Smith, Harriet W Addis01 

Smith, Verna •. Dunde( 

Snarey, Claude Jacksoi 

Sparling, Estelle. Ann Arbo: j 

Stang, Ella G Eayt Tawa! j 

Stebbins, Mildred • Larson Cib j 

Stewart, MarionH PortHuror 

Stickley, Harriet L Prescot 

Stitt, Elmer R Ypsilant j 

Stocum, H. Floyd • Hanove \ 

Stone, Ethel Lima ; 0hl1 

Strain, Alice ^ Rocheste 

Stuart, Syna ...,...'.. Defcr0] 

Sulhvan, Emma Irene f Ypsilanl 

Sumner, Margaret Pellsto 

Surine, Freida Vermontvili 

Swope, Marie Monro 

Taylor, Ruth Royal Oa 

Teachout, Doris L Brookly 

Tesmer, Shirley Ursa Muskego 

Thayer, Edith M Jackso 

Thors, Edith Bessem( 

Timmins, Gertrude D ^' fic] 

Topping, Marion Gregw 

Truxton, Flosie Lansir j 

l rnderhill, 1 Eelen 8 Soufch L ^ c j 

Qnderwood r Gladyfl Y l )Slla " 

Upright, Bernice Pottervil 

Van Camp, Beulah? Y I )Sllan 

Vanderbeck, Maize Alice Pimonda 

V.-m Fleet, Esther L Grand Rap- 






STUDENTS 225 

Van Horn, Catherine Grand Ledge 

Van Tassell, Amos R Laingsburg 

Vater, Mildred Whiting, Ind. 

Veley, Delia Mae Auburn, Ind. 

Vicary, Hazel S Cement City 

Yolz, Marie D Montrose 

Vrooman, Edgar L Yale 

Waggoner, Martha Bad Axe 

Wagner, Norma B Utica 

Wagoner, Darwin E Wayne 

Walker, Howard K Plymouth 

Walker, Lester C Perry 

Wallace, Harriet Ellen Bay City 

Walters, Alfred Jackson 

Walton, Vera Morgan 

Warner, Josephine F Ypsilanti 

Warner, Lula E . Lansing 

Washburne, Mabel Grass Lake 

Watkins, Josephine Grass Lake 

Watson, Carrie V Bad Axe 

Webster, Millicent Frances Port Huron 

Weksler, Bessie Elberta 

Weksler, Dora Elberta 

Weksler, Rose Elberta 

Welch, Winifred C Bear Lake 

Wells, Dorothea Eagle 

Weng, Myrtle Daggett 

Wescott, Howard A Hanover 

IWestbrook, Ruth O Pontiac 

•Western, Iva Flint 

jWestover, Florence Bay City 

|\Vneeler, Dorothy St. Joseph 

jWheeler, Nellie M Snover 

vVhittingham, Esther E Detroit 

Wieland, Gladys Lansing 

j tViese, Albert C - Fair Haven 

i-Vilkinson, Lunette Fowlerville 

IVillmore, Gernith S Stockbridge 

IVilson, Beatrice . .Jackson 

89 



226 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wiltshire, Marshall Onaway 

Wolverton, Helen Huron, Ohio 

Wolverton, E. Pearl Huron, Ohio 

Wooldridge, Mary E Belding 

Worden, Lois Gregory 

Worner, Bernice Grand Rapids 

Wren, Tressa E Corunna 

Wright, Keitha Doreen Carson City 

Yeiser, Garnet A j Avilla, Ind. 

Yost, Jennie Belleville 

Young, Irene Moscow 

Young, Mary Van Wert, Ohio 

Young, Reuben L Tecumseh 

Younglove, Earl H Ida 

Zink, Alfred Ypsilanti 

SECOND YEAR 

Abbott, Helen B Coldwater 

Abelman, Sarah Bessemer 

Ackerman, Lelia B Unionville 

Adams, Dorothy May Muskegon 

Adams, Helen C New Boston 

Adams, Margaret E Wheaton, 111. 

Adams, Myrna Lansing 

Alkire, Alberta Ypsilanti 

Ankebrant, John Sebewaing 

Applegate, Florence Oak Harbor, Ohio 

Ardner, Alma G Shepherd 

Ardner, Hazel V Shepherd 

Arendsen, Harter Holland 

Arthur, Iva D Rose City 

Ashdon, Lyla,. .] Mancelona 

Austin, Franklin H Laingsburg 

Baker, MetaE Marine City 

Ball, Gladys M Lennon 

Ballard, EJsther Cedar Springs 

Barber, M. Eva Stanton 

6arnes, Marion E Almont^ 

Beach, Elizabeth F Clinton, 






STUDENTS 227 

Bean, Carl L Conklin 

Beck, Helga W Baraga 

Bennett, Mildred I Plymouth 

Bennetts, Gertrude Bessemer 

Bennie, Lillian Sault Ste. Marie 

Benson, Ella Frankfort 

Bentley, Beulah .. Lum 

Berg, Nellie Bessemer 

Berry, Myrtle Marie Grand Rapids 

Bibbins, Laurence W Ypsilanti 

Binns, Ruth Elizabeth Buchanan 

Bissell, Lottie Ypsilanti 

Bloom, Emmaretta Maple City 

Bogert, Lora Ann Arbor 

Bohnet, Helen Lansing 

Boles, Genevieve R Saginaw 

Bowen, Ruth C Ypsilanti 

Boyd F. Jennie Vermontville 

Bradley, Ragna Bessemer 

Branch, Jennie ' Saginaw 

Branch, M. Marian Orion 

Brewbaker, Mrs. Nellie Holbrook St. Johns 

Brinker, Mable Fern Detroit 

Brooker, Rosalind Wyandotte 

Brooks, Bertha Birmingham 

Brooks, Dorothy L Omer 

Brown, Alice Evelyn Caro 

Brown, Ruth S Dexter 

Brusie, Muriel E North Branch 

Budd, Esther Perrysburg, Ohio 

Burk, I. Lucile St. Johns 

Burling, Lyle ; Calumet 

Burr, Doris Esther Central Lake 

Burton, Grace Walker Detroit 

Buttolph, Gertrude Ionia 

Button, Frances Ypsilanti 

Callahan, Leo Owosso 

Campbell, Anna Lou Jackson 

Carlson, Martha M St. Louis 



228 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Carpenter, Ralph R Pontiac 

Carr, Eleanor E Pontiac 

Casler, Doris Ann Arbor 

Chadwick, E. Marie Marion 

Chaffee, Joyce Ovid 

Challis, Hazel . Ypsilanti 

Chambers, Mabel D t Alveda, Ohio 

Chapman, Nila Greenville 

Chatfield, Ethyl L Grand Rapids 

Childs, John Robert , Vermontville 

Chinnock, Irene M . Grayling 

Christopher, Mary Louise Canton, III. 

Clapper, M. Arbutus Baldwin 

Clawson, Gladys Lansing 

Cleary, Owen J Ypsilanti 

Cleveland, Nannette . Grand Rapids 

Clevenger, Mary Kathryn Niles 

Clifford, Lillian Caspian 

Coad, Myrtle Detroit 

Cochran, Julia G ' Horton 

Coleman, Leone M Wheeler 

Collier, Helen Ann Arbor 

Collins, Marion P Eaton Rapids 

Conat, John Blaine 

Congdon, Marjorie Wixom 

Conrad, Bessie Vernon 

Cooley, Leota M Fremont 

Cooper, U. Sidney Ida 

Corey, Muriel Grand Rapids 

Corrigan, Emmet J Detroit 

Cosier, Laila N Bear Lake 

Crampton, J. E St. Clair 

Crawford, Zibbie L Otisville 

Crittenden, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Croll, H. F Adrian 

Cronenwett, William George Ida 

Cross, Ethel Detroit 

, Ola M Jackson 

man, Bruno Detroit 



STUDENTS 229 



Crumley, James Detroit 

Crumley, Marguerite E Detroit 

Cudney, Edith M i Owosso 

Curnow, Nydia Stambaugh 

Curtis, Marion S Dansville 

Curtis, Myrnetta Dansville 

Curts, Eleanor E Saginaw 

Dailey, Helen ' Saginaw 

Dalton, Mary E Yankton, S. D.. 

Darling, Jennie Ypsilanti 

Davey, Ruth Rives Jet. 

Davis, Blanche Bay City 

Davis ; Jennie Ypsilanti 

Davis, Luella Ypsilanti 

Davison, Alice „ Ypsilanti 

Davison, Pauline Flint 

Dean, Mildred Rusha Ypsilanti 

Delaforce, Florence Milan 

DeRuiter, Margaret Grand Rapids 

Dick, Mildred Catherine Ann Arbor 

Dodge, Sara Jane Antioch, 111. 

Doering, Olga Grand Rapids 

Doig, Winnifred Reading 

Dooling, Gertrude Mishawaka, Ind. 

Downing, Eunice ,. Grand Rapids 

Drake, Don Ypsilanti 

Drapeau, Marie V Freda 

Dreibelbis, Leslie R Orangeville, 111. 

Driscoll, Aileen C Hubbell 

Drodt, Norma Luella Ida 

Drouyor, Dorothy Brooklyn 

Dubry, Mary E Wyandotte 

Durance, William Charlevoix 

Duval, Etta L Grand Marais 

Easton, Alice Port Huron 

Eddington, Mary Belle Grand Rapids 

Edwards, Hazel F Harrisville 

Edwards, Helen A Ypsilanti 

Eisenmann, Warren T Samaria 



230 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Eldred, Esther Ypsilanti 

Erickson, Waive A Onekama 

Ewing, Doris 1 6 Grand Rapids 

Eyler, Loien E Ypsilanti 

Eyster, Florence R Cincinnati, Ohio 

Farr, Dorothy B ' . Levering 

Farrish, Florence * Ypsilanti 

Fay, Nettie L Holt 

Fearron, Rose C Sparta 

Felter, Ruth Aristeen Manitou Beach 

Ferris, Helen M Morenci 

Fields, Clio G Fowleryille 

Finan, Ann , Detroit 

Fish, Eleanor Lee Algonac 

Fiss, Esther L. C . „ : Albion 

Flynn, Helen Wapakoneta, O. 

Forsberg, Lela M North Bradley 

Foster, Ruth Mitchell Traverse City 

Fotheringham, Inez L Bay City 

Fox, Doris M Morenci 

Foy, William E Coldwater 

Frederick, Ellenor Detroit 

Freed, Gertrude Lillian Toledo, O. 

Freund, Katherine St. Joseph 

Fry, Charlotte W Mason 

Frye, Cornelia New Richmond, O. 

Fuller, Zoa E Hart 

Fullerton, Eleanor Ann Arbor 

Fulmer, Florence Canton, 0. 

Fulton, Dorothy T Cherry Run, W. Va. 

Gagnon, Harriet Monroe 

Gagnon, Melba A Rockland 

( rallup, Edna Cambridge, 0. 

Garvey, Minette Alpena 

Gary, LaVange M Cement City 

Gault, Alma Marie Flint 

Gayleard, Ethona M Baltimore, Md. 

Gee, Frances M Ypsilanti 

r, Eldon Cleo Lake City 



STUDENTS 231 

Gibbs, H. Britton % Marion 

Gibson, Mildred L Wixom 

GiffeLs, ( Jlara 1 Laingsburg 

( riffels, Irma Laingsburg 

Gilbert, Marian J Moline 

Gilson, Mabel Deerfield 

Gingras, Yvonne Iron Mountain 

Gorham, Donald Britton 

Gorton, Vivian R , .Waterloo 

Graham, May E Baraga 

(hams, Gladys Milan 

Granger, Thela B Charlotte 

Greene, Doris I Ypsilanti 

Greenhoe, Erma Lawrence 

Greiner, Julia Pinckney 

Grenfall, Margaret Iron Mountain 

Griffith, Katherine Lansing 

Groh, Ruth E Detroit 

Grove, Marguerite Hillsdale 

Guder, Margaret Gertrude Saginaw 

Gustafson, Dorothy South Bend, Ind. 

Gustafson, Ruth St. Joseph 

Hagni, Zora South Lyon 

Hainer, Ruth Manistee 

Hall, Dorothy M Imlay City 

Hallock, Dena M Birmingham 

Hamilton, Charlotte M % Decker 

Hammond, Minnie Dell Ypsilanti 

Hankammer, Anna S Van Wert, Ohio 

Hanna, Margaret Iron Mountain 

Hansor, William Ypsilanti 

Harrington, Katherine Blissfield 

Harris, Flossie St. Johns 

Harris, Howard Ypsilanti 

Harris, Zita A Pinckney 

Harsha, Katherine Charlevoix 

Harwood, Josephine Ionia 

Haskins, Helen B Waterville, Ohio 

Hassel, Esther Marie Calumet 



232 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hawken, Lillian . . . . Birmingham 

Hawkins, Hazel Vermontville 

Hayner, Anna Lou. . . Ypsilanti 

Heavey, Catherine E Detroit 

Helienberg, B. M Coldwater 

Hill, Gladys M Flint 

Hirsch, Lottie Leone Benton Harbor 

Hodges, Genevieve Ithaca 

Hoegner, Helen Lima, O. 

Hoffman, Ora Mancelona 

Holden, Signa R Elberta 

Holland, Frances Detroit 

Hollway, Marion Pontiac 

Hopf , Norma Calumet 

Horn, Anna Charlotte 

House, Janice Whitefish Pt. 

Hulbert, Florence A St. Ignace 

Hulett, Hildegarde Armada 

Hunt, Arlene Bellaire 

Huston, Mabel M Potterville 

Hyney, Helena A Owosso 

Ibe, Bertha S . . . . Newaygo 

Ingall, Marie Morenci 

Irish, Carrie . Dundee 

Irwin, Gertrude Sault Ste. Marie 

James, Merney C Calumet 

Janousek, Dennis L Charlotte 

Jeffery, Ruth Hancock 

Johnson, Beatrice Laurium 

Johnson, Edith M Norway 

Johnson, Effie M Williamstown, W. Va. 

Jose, Adelia Painesdale 

Kansas, Sophie Calumet 

Keefer, Belle Osseo 

Keeler, Mrs. Lay ton Washington 

Keeney, I lazol Lansing 

Keller, Vetera Pearl Howell 

Kelly, Kate T Conklin 

Kenyon, Knoll I Grarfd Rapids 



STUDENTS 233 

Kile, Sadie E Caro 

Kincaid, Faye Hersey 

Kirk, Howard D Milan 

Klahn, Nellie Clarksville 

Kline, Alice M Sanborn, N. Y. 

Klotz, Edith Lucile Hammond, Ind. 

Knicely, Glen Willis 

Koperski, Lucille . Grand Rapids 

Kreimann, Vera Saginaw 

Krempel, Eda Manistee 

Lamb, Sarah L Fitzgerald, Ga. 

Lambertson, Lorene Rochester 

Lange, Margarefc Big Rapids 

Langlois, Loretta Fraser Detroit 

Lansing, Alice Lucinda Lansing 

Lardie, Annette M Traverse City 

Larkin, Collette Iron Mountain 

Lathers, Helen E Ypsilanti 

Leary, Veronica Hancock 

Leavitt, Dorothy Alpena 

Ledwidge, Germaine Pinckney 

Leonard, Myrtle Mae Crystal Falls 

Lester, Lexie Harbor Beach 

Lewis, Mrs. Leroy C Ypsilanti 

Liggett, Inez Marengo, O. 

Limpert, Lillian E Toledo, O. 

Lobker, Margaret Coral 

Long, Mary A Mt. Morris. 

Lowing, Glenna M Traverse City 

Lown, Violet Flint 

Maginn, Mary Mt. Morris 

Mair, Mabel J Almont 

Marston, Elizabeth Calumet 

Marx, Vera E Detroit 

Mother, Edna -.Plymouth 

Maxwell, Ella P Pigeon 

Mayer, Helen Louise Ann Arbor 

Mc \tee, Veva Dundee 

McCall, Helen Mae Grass Lake 



234 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



McCloskey, G. E Pinckney 

McCormick, Lillian E Huron, O. 

MacDonald, Ruth Lake Linden 

McDonnell, Gladys Detroit 

McDougald, Rosena M Onaway 

MacDougall, Hilda Jean Brown City 

McGill, Martha Bear Lake 

MacKellar, Lorna Ypsilanti 

McKinnon, Marian .Frankfort 

McLaughlin, Eileen Lansing 

McRoy, Eva Marlette 

McRoy, Vera Marlette 

Meyer, Esther L Fowler 

Meyers, Hazel E Grand Rapids 

Michaels, Velma A Alma 

Millard, Onahbelle L Jeddo 

Miller, Clarence W Dansville 

Miller, Lucile M Pontiac 

Miller, Marian Adelle .' Paw Paw 

Milliken, Mildred Shepherd 

Miller, Thelma Gladys Newark, 0. 

Mills, Ruth Pontiac 

Minier, Thelma Big Rapids 

Mitchell, Winifred Tecumsch 

Moffatt, Catherine Crittenden .Traverse City 

Mooney, Emma Welday Toledo, O. 

Moore, Eva M Sault Ste. Marie 

Moore, Mildred K Toledo, (). 

Morley, Mrs. Mary Coloma 

Mortenson, ( Fndine Arcadia 

Moeher, ( Seraldine E Detroit 

Mosher, Mina Yale 

Munroe, Loretta Laurium 

Murphy, Mrs. L, \\ Gladstone 

Musolf, Elsie TawasCity 

Nason, < Hadys I* Saginaw 

' , N' VBsda E. Liverpool, (). 

Netzorg, Amelia Detroit 

1 •. ' I: Muskegon 






STUDENTS 235 

Newbecker, Edwina Essexville 

Newbury, F. Gerald Hanover 

Newcomb, Berniece Ypsilanti 

Newcomb, Gladys Charlotte 

Newton, Irma C Sault Ste. Marie 

Noble, Martha B Farmington 

Nott, Mildred A Ann Arbor 

Noxon, Marjorie : Greenville 

( Oliver, Clinton W Ypsilanti 

( 'liver, Helen East Tawas 

( )liver, Jean Detroit 

( >lsen, Donna Frankfort 

( fsborn, Harold D Whittaker 

in, H. Isabel Cassopolis 

( )t is, Leola E Mason 

Otto, Burdene E Perrinton 

( )vermyer, C. Marjorie Dundee 

Paine, Arville Hancock 

Papke, Edna Wayne 

Pardee, Edna Spring Arbor 

Parks, Xelda Birmingham 

Parshall, Marguerite Detroit 

Parsons, Bertha May Ypsilanti 

Paton, Esther E Ann Arbor 

Patterson, Ruby Vermontville 

Paul, Helen Margaret Eau Claire 

Pedersen, Alice Cadillac 

Perkins, Mary Howell 

Peterson, Edith Brooklyn 

Peterson, June Frankfort 

Ten it, Alice Harbor Beach 

Phelps, Helen Petoskey 

Phillips, Isabelle Lapeer 

Plowfield, Delta Ithaca 

Poling, Eva M Hudson 

Porritt, Asenath L Pontiac 

Porter, Irene Mae Milford 

Potter, Ruth M Battle Creek 

Poucher, Gertrude Morenci 



236 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Preston, Helen B Detroit 

Price, Charlotte A , Perrinton 

Proctor, Ruth Armada 

Pryer, Marian A Portland 

Quick, Greta Nashville 

Quinn, Ernest R Petoskey 

Ravell, Mary Ann Belding 

Raycraft, Bernice Marie Wayne 

Redlin, Minnie Deerfield 

Reese, Elva Reading 

Reid, Irene M Romeo 

Reimann, Ruth D Iron River 

Reisig, Alma Monroe 

Rentfrow, Marcia St. Joseph 

Reynolds, Sarah Ann Arbor 

Richards, Marshall F Oak Grove 

Richards, Ruby B McGregor 

Rider, Ersyl D Howell 

Rininger, Gail Edwardsburg 

Robb, Isabelle Flushing 

Roberts, Elizabeth Gertrude. Ypsilanti 

Robinson, Maude Grand Rapids 

Roe, Helen Ernestine ; Plymouth 

Rogers, Ethel F Crystal Falls 

Rogers, Marilda A Pinckney 

Root, Mrs. Charles A Plymouth 

Ross, Irene Ypsilanti 

Roth, Adolph J Clarksville 

Russell, Ethel M Tecumsch 

Russell, Mina D Saline 

Ryan, Marjorie B Detroit 

Sandberg, Judith Pontiac 

Bandbom, Marian Lansing 

Barks, Alice Tecumsch 

Battler, Katharine Charlotte 

Bayler, Bernice E Big Rapids 

Bayles, Gin Frankfort 

Schaadt, Theo. S Williamstcnj 

Bchafarik, I lorence Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 237 



Bchafer, Rose K Ida 

Bchall, Hazel A Dexter 

Schlappi, Georgina Croswell 

Schmid, Dorothea Holland 

Schroder, Marion A Plymouth 

Schroeder, Ann Mancelona 

Schultz, Alfred L Dundee 

Schultz, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Scott, Frank Romulus 

Scriver, M. Lowella Clinton 

Seebeck, Elizabeth Bay City 

Sellers, Martha Akron 

Shaver, Helen E Bay City 

Shea, Catherine Laurium 

Shehan, Dorothy Pinckney 

Sherman, Phoebe Ypsilanti 

Shutt, Helen A Capac 

Sikorski, Fillie Rhea Cheboygan 

Siple, Esther Carson City 

Slack, Mrs. Myrtle Pfaff Bad Axe 

Smith, Carolyn B Mosherville 

Smith, Harriet H Coldwater 

Smith, Hubert T Vermontville 

Smith, Marie Mackinaw City 

Smith, Marion Ypsilanti 

Snavely, Inez Charlotte 

Spangler, Marian , Saginaw 

Springborn, Ruth Joanna Romeo 

Stanhope, Mabel M , Hart 

Stanley, Helen Waterloo, Ind. 

Stapleton, Katherine M Saginaw 

Starrs, Elizabeth Evalyn . Escanaba 

Stegeman, Louise ' Allegan 

Stevens, Mary C Mancelona 

Stevenson, Gladys Grace Detroit 

Stiles, Ethel Lima, O. 

Stiles, Nellie Lima, O. 

Stone, Margaret Lima, O. 

Storner, Emelia -. Ithaca 



23S NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Sturm, Luelia R Saline 

Swanson, Olga v " Manistee 

Taylor, Amy Lucille Sparta 

Taylor, Mildred F Muskegon 

Thomasma, Katherine Grand Rapids 

Thompson, Frances Ypsilanti 

Thompson, Irene Hart 

Thompson, Vera Eloise Greenville 

Till, Albert W Saugatuck 

Titsworth, Agnes i Lapeer 

Todd, Gertrude Dimondale 

Tomlinson, George E Grand Rapids 

Townsend, Josephine Dansville 

Trim, Alice C Milan 

Tuttle, Cleora Stockbridge 

Valentine, Carol Lansing 

Van Sickle, Paul Maple Rapids 

Van Meet, Mabel St. Johns 

Van Wegen, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Van Wert, Gladys Mosherville 

Vickers, Laura M Caro 

Vielhauer, Louise Ypsilanti 

Vincent, Doris Norway 

Vincent, Grace Flint 

von Jasmund, Helen St. Clair 

V088, Mary B Ludington 

Wagner, Louise M Port Huron 

Walker, Arthur D Cass City 

Walker, Barbara M Highland 

Walker, Beula Barryton 

Walker. Venus Wayne 

Wallace, Mildred Carleton 

Wallington, Vera .1 Ypsilanti 

Warner, Florence Howell 

Warren, Florence A Ovid 

Webb, Roy ( >wen Memphis 

Weber, Agnes I ( Jhelsea 

Weeks, Margaret fallen 

. Marjorie Allen 



STUDENTS 239 



Wegman, Alyne Toledo, O. 

Wellwood, Hazel J Marlette 

Weng, May Belle Daggett 

Westcott, Harold I Addison 

Weter, Grace Richmond 

White, Edithe C Manchester 

White, John G Shelby 

Whitman, Jarda M Springport 

Whitmore, Helen Toledo, O. 

Whit taker, Betty Traverse City 

Wilkinson, Muriel M Saginaw 

Wilks, Lee Yale 

Williams, B.N Ypsilanti 

Williams, Elizabeth Detroit 

Williams, Ethel M Middleton 

Wilson, Caroline L Chicago, 111. 

Wilson, Esther E Cement City 

Wilson, Eva B Ypsilanti 

Wilson, Marion Otsego 

Wilson, Winifred Ann Arbor 

Wilt se, Norris G Tekonsha 

Wing, Mabel Ypsilanti 

Wing, Marie Beatrice Hastings 

Witt, Ada M Ida 

Wolcott, Alice L Mt. Pleasant 

Wood, Elta Ada Flint 

Woodruff, Marie R Kendallville, Ind. 

Woodward, Lucille Clinton 

Woolcott, Alice East Jordan 

Wright, Elaine M . - Harbor Springs 

Yager, Marguerite Onaway 

Yake, Rhea F Deckerville 

Young, Ella M . . . Tecumseh 

Young, Esther Van W r ert, O. 

Young, Margaret A Ypsilanti 

Zapf, Martha Traverse City 

Zepp, Naomi . . • Charlevoix 



240 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






THIRD YEAR 

Best, Martha S Imlay City 

Boughner, Ruth L Sistersville, W. Va. 

CaiT, Marvin S Ypsilanti 

Case, Mary C Ypsilanti 

Clark, Maradia B Whitehall 

Colegrove, Leona R Morenci 

Cooney, Herbert W Ypsilanti 

Durf ee, Margaret Joyce Dexter 

Fidler, Ruth E. Ypsilanti 

Henstock, Mrs. Elizabeth , Ypsilanti 

Hill, Florence N ' Ann Arbor 

Hole, James W Ann Arbor 

Hopkins, Ellen Ypsilanti 

Johnson, William L Flint 

Kapnick, George C . Palmyra 

Lathers, Walter H Ypsilanti 

Lee, Frank H Pontiac 

Lippert, Clinton C St. Louis 

McCue, Jean Ellen Goodells 

Miller, Bertha Grand Rapids 

Oakes, B.J Almont 

Penoyar, Nelle Bangor 

Ploeger, Rudolph II Ypsilanti 

Reynolds, John T Berville 

Rogers, Maurine R Ypsilanti 

Sayles, Hazel Laura Grand Rapids 

Schutz, Rose F Durand 

Shadford, Edwin Warner Ann Arbor 

Shawley, George E Ypsilanti 

Smith, Irene II Pontiac 

Starr, S. S Ypsilanti 

St. Clair, Gladys Marine City 

Btinchoomb, Bina Sunneld 

Wardroper, Alma A Ypsilanti 

Watkins, Flavian Cora] ' Saginaw 

Weaver, May Natchitoches, La. 

Webb, Bar] ( 'linton Memphis 



STUDENTS 241 



Wheeler, Don S Ypsilanti 

Whipple, Ruth Sebewaing 

Wilcox, Ora Lansing 

Wood, Avery C Blanchard 

Wood, Burton D Maltby 

FOURTH YEAR 

Andrus, Wildarene Ann Arbor 

Bemis, Eaton O. . . Temperance 

Brown, Arold W Ypsilanti 

Cai penter, Ralph H Howard City 

Carr, Beatrice Ypsilanti 

Cooper, Grace Pearl Ida 

Crane, Clifford D Linden 

Curtis, Lera B Edmore 

Day, P. S Ypsilanti 

Dodge, Agnes E Antioch, 111. 

Fischer, Fred C Belleville 

Fox, Harold M Fowler 

Gleason, Mary Emmet 

Guenther, Ruth M Ann Arbor 

Hooper, Iva Alma 

Kopka, Merland A Ypsilanti 

Love, Lucile Detroit 

Martin, Irene L Homer 

Milier, V. Lucille Dayton, O. 

Neumann, Helene F Saginaw 

Niblick, Eunice F Jackson 

Pahl, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Peters, Mabel L Petersburg 

Piatt, Raye Roberts Marine City 

Quick, Theodora R Grand Rapids 

| Rynearson, Elton J Ypsilanti 

i Selesky, Inez Ypsilanti 

Speer, Robert K. S Minden City 

Spooner, Ethel Battle Creel$ 

Stevens, Joseph H Detroit 

Van Andel, Cornelius Grand Rapids 

Vedder, Almon V Willis 

31 



242 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Vosburg, Clara M Lapeer 

Whelan, Marjorie M Ann Arbor 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Acker, Evelyn Marguerite Chelsea 

Barnes, Elsie Ypsilanti 

Bibbins, Mrs. L. W .Ypsilanti 

Campbell, Lillian Ypsilanti 

Cayne, Stanley G Ypsilanti 

Chaddock, Esther Ypsilanti 

Clinton, Anna L '. . Ann Arbor 

Cook, Harriet Ann Arbor 

Crandall, Jesse Wright Ypsilanti 

Densmore, Lucia M Ypsilanti 

Deters, Caroline Ann Arbor 

DeWitt, Mrs. Blanche Randall Ypsilanti 

Field, Anna W Grinnell, Iowa 

Fisk, Marjory E Ypsilanti 

Gee, Russell L Ypsilanti 

Gill, Kathleen Ypsilanti 

Glover, Paul Ypsilanti 

Hebblewhite, Mrs. B. M Ypsilanti 

Hedrick, Ethel Ann Arbor 

Henstock, R. A * Ypsilanti 

Hicks, Clara B Ypsilanti 

Hook, Frances Detroit 

Hopkins, Fred Ypsilanti 

Hurst, Mrs. Bertha II Alma 

Judd, Lyle L Ypsilanti 

Kirchhofer, Julia Ann Arbor 

Koon, Margaret Redding Ann Arbor 

Leary, Waller Ypsilanti 

Marschke, Emily R Ann Arbor 

Marx, Carl B » Saginaw 

Moffatt, Mary Linnell Traverse City 

Morrison, Jennie Belle Ypsilanti 

Panek, Jr., Prank Ypsilanti 

Pfisterer, Matilda Ami Arbor 

Ro b, Anabel Hess '. Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 243 

Russell, Josephine Ann Arbor 

Stevens, R. W " Detroit 

St urges, Christine Ann Arbor 

Thomas, Nancy E Ypsilanti 

Van Antwerp, L. B Ypsilanti 

Van Sickle, Mrs. Paul Fowler 

Van Wegen, Nelson L Ypsilanti 

Wheeler, Caroline A ., . Ann Arbor 

Wilcox, Katherine D Detroit 

Woodbury, Frances Ypsilanti 



CONSERVATORY STUDENTS 



Adams, Lorraine, Music and Art Grand Rapids 

Affholder, Frank J., Violin Ypsilanti 

Allen, Faye, Organ Ypsilanti 

Althouse, Alice, Singing Leonard 

Arms, Esther, Singing Ypsilanti 

Arnet, Doris, Piano Ypsilanti 

Arnholt, Ruth, Ukulele Danville, Ohio 

Austin, Virginia, Public School Music West Branch 

Austin, Janice, Organ Saline 

Babcock, Dorothy, Piano „ Ypsilanti 

Banta, Marian, Violin and Piano Ypsilanti 

Banta, Ralph, Piano Ypsilanti 

Barnard, Mrs. Harry, Singing Ypsilanti 

Barnett, Elizabeth, Singing Pontiac 

Bartlett, Eunice, Piano Memphis 

Beaubier, Bessie, Singing Ypsilanti 

Benford, Robert, Organ Grand Blanc 

Bennet, Margaret, Piano Ypsilanti 

Blair, Ellen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Blakeslee, Mrs. B. N., Singing Ypsilanti 

Blakeslee, Eleanor, Music and Art St. Joseph 

Boomer, Ada, Piano Ypsilanti 

Boss, Margaret, Organ Ypsilanti 

Boutelle, Esther, Violin Morrice 



244 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Bowen, Claribel, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bowen, Eleanor, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bowditch, Anna, Piano Ypsilanti 

Braddock, Grace, Music and Art Tawas City 

Bradford, Carrie, Singing Pontiac 

Breakey , James, Piano Ypsilanti 

Breining, Alice, Piano Ypsilanti 

Breining, Mis. Carrie, Piano Ypsilanti 

Breining, Genevieve, Music and Art Ypsilanti 

Brewer, Lyla, Organ Pontiac 

Bridges, Emma, Organ Marine City 

Brigham, Ethel, Singing Millington 

Brimes, Ada, Singing Detroit 

Buchanan, Pearson, Singing Sault Ste. Marie 

Burbank, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Burns, Eva, Public School Music . Oil City, Pa. 

Burt, Mary Helen, Piano Ann Arbor 

Case, Mary, Singing and Piano Ypsilanti 

( Jash, Ruby, Piano Ypsilanti 

Cashmore, Pearl, Public School Music Wyandotte 

Casler, Gertrude, Piano Ypsilanti 

Cassady, Mrs. R. A., Singing Plymouth 

Cassidy, Gertrude, Singing Crystal Falls 

( <iyne, Ruth, Piano. . . " Ypsilanti 

Challis, Grace, Singing . % Ypsilanti 

Challis, John, Piano Ypsilanti 

( Ihipman, Adeline, Piano Gregory 

( Ilapper, Arbutus, Organ Ypsilanti 

Clark, Emily, Piano Belleville 

( Uavette, Gladys, Music and Art Maple City 

( leary, Ruth, Mandolin Ypsilanti 

( Jliffe, Nela May, Violin Lakeview 

( Clifford, Johanna, Singing Ypsilanti 

Coffron, Jeannette, Singing and Piano Ypsilanti 

Colburn, Harriet I 'in no Ypsilanti 

( loleman, ( iertrude, Piano Ypsilanti 

( blister, Edith, Singing Perry 

Collins, Harry, Violin Ypsilanti 

( kmgdon, Reynolds, Guitar Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 245 

Conrad, Emma, Music and Art Ludington 

Corbit, Clarence, Saxaphone Oxford 

Cosgrove, Mary, Violin Ypsilanti 

Cosgrove, Mrs. E. C, Singing Ypsilanti 

Crampton, John E., Singing St. Clair 

Crawford, Ethel, Singing Detroit 

Cross, Ola, Piano Jackson 

Curtis, Eva, Music and Art Charlotte 

Curry, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Cutcher, Floyd, Singing Almont 

Daggett, Marion, Violin Ypsilanti 

Dainbler, Anita, Singing Ypsilanti 

Darling, Jennie, Piano Ypsilanti 

Daugherty, Esther, Piano Kokomo, Ind. 

Davis, Arthur, Piano Ypsilanti 

Devine, Mabel, Singing Ann Arbor 

Dixon, Grace, Piano .Ypsilanti 

Dixon, Irving, Singing Denton 

Delaforce, Dorothy, Piano Ypsilanti 

Delaforce, Bertha, Piano Ypsilanti 

Dodge, Carol, Singing and Piano Middleton 

Dolby, Margaret, Piano Denton 

Dolph, Orpha, Piano Ypsilanti 

Dominick, Mayme, Singing Tyre 

Dredvahl, Mrs. Celia Singing '. Detroit 

Driscoll, Lissa, Piano Ypsilanti 

DuBois, Margaret, Singing Ypsilanti 

Eagles, Charlotte, Piano Ypsilanti 

Elder, Jane, Piano Ypsilanti 

Elliott, Corabel, Organ Ypsilanti 

Elliott, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Emery, Grace, Piano Ypsilanti 

Ensign, Lucille, Piano Ypsilanti 

Esselstyn, Donna, Piano Addison 

Evans, Iris, Piano Ypsilanti 

Everard, Olga, Piano Ypsilanti 

Farrish, Ethel, Piano Ypsilanti 

Fenker, Luther, Piano Ypsilanti 

Fenker, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 



246 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Fidler, Martha, Music and Art Ypsilanti 

Finch, John E., Singing Saline 

Fisk, Frances, Music and Art Edwardsburg 

Flynn, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Ford, Nancy, Ukulele Ypsilanti 

Forester, Mildred, Piano Ypsilanti 

Forsyth, Adadell, Singing Saline 

Foust, Elizabeth, Singing Ithaca 

Fry, Kathleen, Violin Ypsilanti 

Galloway, Mozella, Piano Hudson 

Gauntlett, Helen, Singing Saline 

Gardner, Marion, Music and Art Fowlerville 

Gates, Alleen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Gee, Genevieve, Piano Ypsilanti 

Gee, Russeil L., Organ Ypsilanti 

Gill, Edward, Piano Ypsilanti 

Gill, Kathleen, Piano and Organ Ypsilanti 

Gleason, Ellen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Gotts, Margaret, Piano Ypsilanti 

Grant, Miriam, Music and Art Traverse City 

Gratton, Myra, Music and Art Clayton 

Grayson, Leotta, Music and Art ..Pellston 

Green, Neva, Singing Ypsilanti 

Guinan, Clare, Public School Music Ypsilanti 

Hall, Emily, Organ and Piano Hamilton, 111. 

Hall, Zella, Piano Britton 

I human, M. J., Piano Belleville 

Hansen, Thora, Singing Manistee 

Hardman, Thelmd, Music and Art Glenvillc, W. Va. 

Harnack, Albert, Piano Ypsilanti 

Harris, Bradley, Cornet Belleville 

Harris, Isabel, Piano , Belleville 4 

Harry, Beatrice, Singing Lapeer 

Harwick, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 

I [atch, Eunice, Piano Ypsilanti 

Hause, Maurice, Piano Ypsilanti 

I [ause, Suzie, Singing Flint 

Hellenberg, I>. M., Singing Coldwater 

M< QStocl , Et. A., Violin Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS , 247 



Hickman, Roverta, Piano Ann Arbor 

Hill, Gladys, Piano Bay City 

Hilmer, Gertrude, Singing Ypsilanti 

Hodges, Mildred, Piano Fen ton 

Hodges, Zella, Violin Fenton 

Hopkins, Ellen, Singing m Ypsilanti 

Hopkins, James, Piano Ypsilanti 

Hubbard, Dorothy, Singing Ypsilanti 

Hubbard, Dorothy G., Music and Art Concord 

Hubble, Doris, Piano Ypsilanti 

Hubble, Garfield, Violin Ypsilanti 

Hubble, Marjorie, Piano Ypsilanti 

Hulett, Stuart, Trombone Belleville 

Hunter, Hazel, Singing Flint 

Hutchins, Mrs. H., Singing Ypsilanti 

Johnson, Mable, Piano Ypsilanti 

Johnson, Pauline, Violin Flint 

Jordan, Audrey, Singing Saline 

Kalmback, Dorothy, Music and Art South Lyon 

Kcnyon, Ruth, Organ Chicago, 111. 

Kerr, Alice, Violin Ypsilanti 

Kerr, Katherine, Piano Ypsilanti 

Klotz, Lucile, Piano Ypsilanti 

Knight, Lester, Piano Laingsburg 

Koon, Margaret, Singing Ypsilanti 

Krebs, Fern, Piano New Boston 

Kurimo, Ina, Piano Ypsilanti 

LaGassey, Homer, Piano Detroit 

Lancaster, Minota, Public School Music Clinton 

LaRose, Lula, Public School Music Essexville 

Latimer, Marian, Piano Ypsilanti 

Lawrence, Mrs. David, Singing Ypsilanti 

Lemmon, Pauline, Cornet Litchfield 

Lewis, Henry, Piano Ypsilanti 

Lewis, Irene, Piano Ypsilanti 

Lewis, Mary Ellen, Singing Ypsilanti 

Lock, Grace, Piano Ypsilanti 

Lockwood, Iva, Singing Ypsilanti 

Lorch, Hermine, Singing Detroit 



248 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






Major, Zura, Piano Ypsilanti 

Manchester, Thelma, Piano Ypsilanti 

McClung, Alberta, Singing Ypsilanti 

McCool, Marian, Singing Ypsilanti 

McDonnell, Gladys, Piano Ypsilanti 

McElhenie, Leah, Violin Concord 

McKimmie, Janet, Music and Art South Haven 

McKnight, Helen, Piano and Singing Concord 

McLouth, Bruce, Piano Ypsilanti 

Mac Neil, Laura, Singing Ypsilanti 

McNutt, Earl K, Violin Memphis 

Marx, Vera, Piano Ypsilanti 

Meacham, J Willva, Piano Holly 

Meier, Gladys, Singing Grand Ledge 

Meyers, A. L., Trombone Ypsilanti 

Michos, Leona, Piano ." Ypsilanti 

Miller, Bernice, Piano Ypsilanti 

Miller, Glenn, Violin Ypsilanti 

Miller, Dorothy, Piano Ypsilanti 

Miller, Marion, Piano Ypsilanti 

Miller, Wendell, Piano Ypsilanti 

Mitchell, Margery, Music and Art Marine City 

Moore, Jessie Piano Ypsilanti 

Moore, Nina, Piano Ypsilanti 

Morris, Edna, Singing Hudson 

Moeher, Edward, Violin Ypsilanti 

Mosher, Mary, Piano Ypsilanti 

Nelson, Bernice, Public School Music Petoskey 

Neville, Genevieve, Singing Muskegon 

Northrup, Eunice, Singing and Violin Lawrence 

Northrup, Violet, Piano Ypsilanti 

Norton, Stanley, Singing Ypsilanti 

Nulan, Genevieve, Singing Ypsilanti 

Olmstead, Dorothy, Piano Ypsilanti 

( t'Rourke, Doris, Singing Richmond 

Ostrander, Neva, Public School Music Ypsilanti 

on, Lucinda, Singing Grass Lake 

e, Beatrice, Singing and Piano DeckerviUe^ 

Paine, Esther, Piano Maple Rapids; 



STUDENTS 240 

Parker, Florence, Piano Ypsilanti 

Parsons, Bertha, Piano Ypsilanti 

Pearson, Eleanor, Music and Art Norway 

Peet, Margaret, Piano Ypsilanti 

Penton, Gayla, Music and Art Smyrna 

Pettit, Bernice, Singing Ypsilanti 

Phelps, Alice, Piano Ypsilanti 

Phelps, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Phipps, Bernice, Piano Dearborn 

Piper, Mrs. E. E., Organ. Ypsilanti 

Plagg, Hilda Piano Belleville 

Plague, Winona, Piano Belleville 

Pray, Audrey, Piano Ypsilanti 

Pray, Carl, Piano Ypsilanti 

Powers, Mary, Singing Olney, 111. 

Pyrtle, Mary, Piano and Singing Ypsilanti 

Quirk, Julia, Piano Ypsilanti 

Rathbun, Marie, Singing Ypsilanti 

Ray, Sybil, Singing and Piano Concord 

Raycraf t, Bernice, Organ , Wayne 

Reiser, Leora, Singing .'.... Ypsilanti 

Riemenschneider, Hilda, Piano Chelsea 

Roberts, Rena, Ukulele Ypsilanti 

Rogers, Ethel, Music and Art Crystal Falls 

Root, Charles, Violin Plymouth 

Ryan, William, Singing Ypsilanti 

Sanderson, Harvey, Trombone Ypsilanti 

Sapnars, Tom, Mandolin Ypsilanti 

Savage, Frances, Piano , Belleville 

Sayles, Ola, Singing Frankfort 

Scheffler, Carl, Violin Ypsilanti 

Schmid, Mabel, Music and Art Petersburg 

Schulze, Edna, Singing and Organ Ypsilanti 

Schumacker, Rubena, Piano Saline 

Scott, Helen, Singing Ann Arbor 

Seeger, Charles, Singing Ypsilanti 

Shattuck, Winnified, Organ Covert 

Shearer, Helen, Singing Wayne 

Shepherd, Jessie, Piano Ypsilanti 



250 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Sherman, Helen, Music and Art Evart 

Sinkule, Joseph, Piano Ypsilanti 

Sinkule, Lemar, Violin. . . Ypsilanti 

Sinkule, Theresa, Piano Ypsilanti 

Slick, Winnifred, Piano : Ypsilanti 

Small, Hazel, Singing Detroit 

Smith, Beverly, Cornet Belleville 

Smith, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Smith, Lena, Piano Ypsilanti 

Snow, Margaret, Piano Ypsilanti 

Sobolewsky, Velma, Piano .• Belleville 

Soule, Pauline, Cello Centerville 

Spencer, Harold, Violin Ypsilanti 

Spofford, Ellatheda, Singing Ypsilanti 

Stanley, Ruth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Stewart, Clara, Singing Pontiac 

Strong, Frances, Organ Ypsilanti 

Svang, Lillian, Organ Ypsilanti 

Taylor, Dorothy, Public School Music Clinton 

Taylor, Mildred, Singing Ypsilanti 

Taylor, Theresa, Violin Ann Arbor 

Tenhaaf, Mabel, Singing Grand Rapids 

Thiesen, Bernice, Piano Detroit 

Thomas, Wilma, Music and Art Corunna, Ind. 

Thorn, Veva, Organ Ypsilanti 

Thumm, LeMar, Piano Ypsilanti 

Trafelet, Ethel, Singing Calumet 

Travis, Mrs. Ethel, Public School Music Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, lone, Piano Belleville 

Turney, Mrs. Wm., Singing Ypsilanti 

Valian, Irene, Piano Ypsilanti 

Van Sk kle, Mis. Paul, Singing and Piano Ypsilanti 

dickers, Laura, Piano Caro 

Vielhauer, Janette, Piano Ypsilanti 

Vielhauer, Mrs. Louise, Piano Ypsilanti 

Von Jasmund, Helen, Singing St. Clair 

Vorhees, Mi . Ruby, Singing Ypsilanti 

\\ aggoner, Mae, \Iu. ic and Art Pinnebog 

W: \ i r, ( rlady , Musicand Art Chesaning 



STUDENTS 251 



Wardroper, Agnes, Piano Ypsilanti 

Watson, Marion, Singing Ypsilanti 

Wearne, Elizabeth, Singing Allegan 

Webber, Clara, Piano Ypsilanti 

Weinman, Evelyn, Public School Music Ypsilanti 

Weiss, Pauline, Music and Art Jackson 

Wells, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Wheeler, Donald, Violin Ypsilanti 

White, Russell, Violin Ypsilanti 

Wliittaker, Bess, Piano , Traverse City 

Wiison, Frances, Music and Art Tawas City 

Wiison, Pearl, Piano Ypsilanti 

Winsor, Ruth, Singing Canton 

Winters, Dorothy, Piano Vanderbilt 

Wood, Avery, Piano Ypsilanti 

Wood, Dorothy, Public Schol Music Oil City, Pa. 

Wood, Nadine, Violin Belleville 

Wright, Keitha, Violin Carson City 

Wyckoff, Ruth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Yake, Rhea, Music and Art Deckerville 

Young, Frances, Piano Ypsilanti 

Young, Mrs. J. C, Singing Ypsilanti 

Young, Marie, Singing v Ypsilanti 

Zeigen, Eola, Singing Ypsilanti 

Zeigen, Phyllis, Piano Ypsilanti 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

1920 



Abbott, Hazel Ludington 

Abbott, Ruth E Hudson 

Abramson, Lillian Laurium 

Ackerman, Ethel W Pigeon 

Ackerman, Lelia B Unionville 

Ackerson, Margaret Clarksville 

Ackerson, Olive W Goodrich 

Ackley, Zenana Hester Grand Haven 



252 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Adams, Glactys Marjorie Port Huron 

Adams, Helen M : Caseville 

Adams, Mary F Britton 

Affholder, F. J Detroit 

AfTolter, Mary E Trenton 

Agnew, Eva Middleville 

Agnew, W. F Middleville 

Aikman, Fern Mae Vanderbilt 

' Aldrich, Beatrice Vassar 

Aldrich, Luetta M Royal Oak 

Aldrich, Perrien E Royal Oak 

Allen, Florence M . Traverse City 

Allen, lone Sanf ord Bellaire 

Allen, lieila . Corunna 

Allerding, Peter Hastings 

Aithouse, Alice Leonard 

Amidon, Mae Greenville 

Amspoker, Lula Newark, Ohio 

Anderson, Anne J Steubenville, Ohio 

Anderson, Florence Esther Adrian 

Anderson, Gladys E Steubenville, Ohio 

Anderson, Jennie Big Rapids 

Anderson, I. Millicent . Boyne City 

Anderson, Susie Marlette 

Andrews, Dorothy Jonesville 

Andrews, Elsie V Ypsilanti 

Annas, Isabel Port Huron 

Antcliff, Helen E Brooklyn 

Arbaugh, Margaret M Canton, O. 

Arens, Isabella Fowler 

A lis, V. Maud Alpena 

Armentrout, Genevra Jackson 

Armistead, Catherine B Indianapolis, Ind. 

Armistead, Lucile Indianapolis, Ind. 

Arnholt, Leila Ruth Danville, 111. 

Arnold, ( reorgia F Dorranceton, Pa. 

Arnold, Gladys M Lansing 

Arnold, Hazel Oxford 

Arnold, Ruth Laurium 



STUDENTS 253 

Asman, Mabel L Bay City 

Atkinson, Christina C Belleville 

Austin, Ruby Dundee 

Avery, Eula V Ann Arbor 

Avery, Lloyd G , Mason 

Ayre, Ruby Elliott Montgomery 

Bacon, Ella Escanaba 

Baird, Charlie Ann Arbor 

Baker, Edna Grand Ledge 

Baker, Grover C . . Ypsilanti 

Baker, Irene H Clayton 

Ball, Gladys . Manitou Beach 

Ball, Muriel Oak Grove 

Ball, Verian A Linden 

Ball, Winfield John Ypsilanti 

Ballentine, Marjorie Port Huron 

Bamber, Ethel M Howell 

Banister, Vera M Springport 

Banwell, Yolande Ypsilanti 

Barber, Alice E Adrian 

Barber, Margaret Buckley 

Barden, Donald Otisville 

Barker, Thelma Lake Odessa 

Barnes, Marion Ypsilanti 

Barnett, Elizabeth Helen Pontiac 

Barnhart, Alberta L St. Charles 

Barr, Mary E Canton, 0. 

Barrett, Eloise Hudson 

Bartle, Cora L Cass City 

Bartlett, May Akron, O. 

Bartlett, Rita E Saginaw 

Barton, R. C Romulus 

Bartow, Marion C Marion 

Bassett, J. H Port Huron 

Batcheler, Muriel Howell 

Batcheler, Sarah J . Howell 

Bates, Edith Leonard 

Bates, Edith M Mancelona 

Bates, Lillian Detroit 



254 NORMAL COLL1TGE YEAR BOOK 

Bates, Mary I Vassar 

Baxter, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 

Beach, Winifred Port Huron 

Beachum, Edna '. Shelby 

Beal, Florence A Britton 

Beal, Veneita E., Addison 

Bearinger, M. Edna Saginaw 

Beattie, Nina M Bay City 

Beaubier, Bessie Ypsilanti 

Beaufait, Clara M Mt. Clemens 

Beckman, Edith A Detroit 

Beckwith, Flora Milford 

Bedford, Myrl Williamston 

Bell, Emma E Reading 

Bemis, Eaton O Temperance 

Benedict, Geraldinc Ionia 

Benford, Robert T Grand Blanc 

Bennetts, Pearl Bessemer 

Bennitt, Pauline Laingsburg 

Benrick, Esther Ahmcek 

Bensett, Iva .* Holly 

Benson, Annetta *. Caspian 

Bentley, Lulu M Marion 

Bergin, Florence Howell 

Berry, Josephine Oscoda 

Bertke, S. Madeline Manchester 

. Martha S -. Imlay City 

Beutler, Jennie E Cass City 

Bibbins, L. \\ Ypsilanti 

Bidwell, Mae Brighton 

Bigelow, Alice I'' Cass City 

Bigelow, Laura M Cass City 

Binj bam, Mary E Alpena 

Bird, Clifford J Standish 

Bird, Nancie Wayne 

Bishop, Margar< I . .Hillsdale 

II, Marguerite E Hanover 

Uice Bremen, 0. 

Blackner, Lillian < I Toledo, O. 



STUDENTS 255 

Bliton, Esther Ann Arbor 

Bloodgood, Dorothea Traverse City 

Bloy, Clarice Louise Calumet 

Bock, Pauline Owosso 

Bolger, Vera M Woodstock, 111. 

Bolter, Mrs. Minnie Lansing 

Boomer, Lucille Ypsilanti 

Boone, Mary Quincy 

Boone, Rose M Zeeland 

Boorom, Ella M Waterville, O. 

Boorom, L. Azora Waterville, O. 

Bordine, Caroline M Monroe 

Borton, Elsie Cambridge, O. 

Boucher, Marjorie G Cheboygan 

Bouldin, Ann W Saginaw 

Bovee, Hazel M Clayton 

Bower, Edna I Perry 

Bowlby, Dora * Detroit 

Bowler, Katherine Elba 

Bowman, Madeleine Pinckney 

Bowne, Marjorie Dexter 

Boylan, Bernice . . . . _ Brighton 

Braa, Ingaborg, M National Mine 

Bradford, Carrie L Pontiac 

Bradley, Wilda Detroit 

Bradshaw, Gwen Reese Saginaw 

Braidwood, Mary B Romeo 

Braidwood, Sara M Romeo 

Bray, Ida Columbus, Ind. 

Brege, Eleanora . Rogers 

Brenner, Genevieve E Williamston 

Bretscher, Elsie * Grand Rapids 

Brewer, Lylia H Pontiac 

Brewer, Zada Albion ■ 

Bridges, Emma Marine City 

Bridger, Gladys Perry 

Brigham, Ethel Millington 

Brobst, Elva C Sugarloaf, Pa. 

Brock, Grace H .Whitehall 



256 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Broecker, Hilda P Goodrich 

Broka, Esther Perrysburg, 0. 

Broka, Lilhan M . . , Sturgis 

Broka w, Edna Rushton 

Brokaw, Rhena G Lansing 

Brooks, Dorothy L Omer 

Brooks, Ida Carson City 

Brooks, Minnie Birmingham 

Broome, Lilian Mt. Clemens 

Brotherton, Ethel Grand Rapids 

Brown, Alice Reading 

Brown, Arold W Ypsilanti 

Brown, C.J Petersburg 

Brown, Mrs. E.J Washington, Ark. 

Brown, Edwin Pinckney 

Brown, Lena G . Brazil, Ind. 

Brown, Rachel G Homer 

Brown, Retta M * Caro 

Brown, Viola Snover 

Bruck, Ursula Maybee 

Brundage, Pearl Pinconning 

Brunson, M. Ina Rockwood 

Buchanan, E. P Sault Ste. Marie 

Budd, Myrtle F Ypsilanti 

Buehl, Sarah Cincinnati, 0. 

Bunn, Orpha L New Hudson 

Burch, Hazel Manchester 

Burdick, Helen Carter Ann Arbor 

Burg, Alfield Scottville 

Burg, Olga Scottville 

Burgeee, Millie Dryden 

Burgmann, Glenn : Elkton 

Burkheiser, Anna Ypsilanti 

Burkheiser, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 

Burke, Alice M Pontiac 

Burnell, Glen E Memphis 

Burr, Hon.- E Central Lake 

Burt, Helen : Ortonville 

Burton, W. Q Bay City 



STUDENTS 257 

Bush, Zetta Milford 

Butler, Clarissa Calumet 

Butler, Helen D Port Huron 

Butzcr, Ella M Montague 

Cadarette, Mabel Alpena 

Cady, Donna Ypsilanti 

Caesar, Ernestine Calumet 

Caldwell, Alice V Kalkaska 

Caldwell, Frances E Constantine 

( Jaldwell, Jennie E Bryan, O. 

Calhoun, Herbert Williamston 

Callahan, Leo • Owosso 

( Ja iiinan, Ethel Woodstock, 111. 

Campbell, Irma Pontiac 

( Jampbell, Kenneth E Allen 

Campbell, Mabel Gaylord 

Cannon, Clarence W Ypsilanti 

Capling, Dovetta Bad Axe 

Caiey, Florence , Woodstock, 111. 

Carpenter, Jos Croswell 

Carr, Beatrice Ypsilanti 

Carr, Mrs. Edith I Ann Arbor 

Carr, Eleanor Pontiac 

Carroll, Catherine Grand Rapids 

Cary, Ursula Croswell 

( Jase, Alice Blissfield 

Case, Mabel Blissfield 

Cash, Ruby Ypsilanti 

)', Frances Ann Arbor 

idy, Gertrude N Crystal Falls 

Chadwick, E. Marie Marion 

Chaffee, Joyce Ovid 

Challis, Hazel Ypsilanti 

Chaney, Martha Rapid City 

»in, Lillian H Bear Lake 

Chapman, Elmer J Memphis 

( Jhase, Henry S , Ida 

see, Olive M Muskegon 

( 'hinnock, Irene M Grayling 

33 



258 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Christopher, Louise K Fruitport 

Churchill, Alberta M Port Huron 

Clark, Alberta M Morenci 

Clark, Belle C Port Huron 

( 'lark, Marian Adrian 

Clark, M. Marjory Petersburg 

Clay, Gladys M Bancroft 

Cliffe, Nila May Lakeview 

Clinton, Anna L Ann Arbor 

Close, Edna Fenton 

Qoates, Mary H Flint 

( Ychrane, Mrs. Edith Jackson 

Cole, Beatrice Snovcr 

( Jole, Bessie I Evart 

( VlegTove, Leona R Morenci 

Coleman, E. May Flint 

Coleman, Leone M Wheeler 

( -olerane, Julia A Winchester, Ky. 

( \ man, Gladys Waldron 

Connelly, Mary G ! Columbiavillc 

( tenners, Katherine M Port Huron 

( tonrad, Bessie Vernon 

Conrad, E. Tessie Vernon 

Cook, Emma A Ann Arbor 

( ook, Esther J Ionia 

Cook, Josephine Davisburg 

( look, Marian Mason 

( look, Nellie L Jasper 

( Jook, Thelma I Stockbridge 

Cooper, Beatrice Dcford 

i Jooper, Minnie Frankfort 

( Jourtney, Grace Mansfield, O. 

( Novell, Sadie J': '. . Morenci 

Coverdale, Oleta DeWitt 

phine Concord 

Ruth E Petersburg 

pton, J. B St. Clair 

( 'raft, Adelaide E Grass Lake 

Crane, Irene Portland 



STUDENT* 259 

( Jrankshaw, Thelma Haclley 

( 'rawford, Helen Brooklyn 

Crawford, Isabelle Mt. Clemens 

( Crawford, Ruth Romeo 

Crawford, Wanda Sunfield 

( Midland. Esther L Cass City 

( Jrippen, Mrs. Mae Coldwater 

( JrisweU, Edna Canton, 0. 

Croll, Helen E Britton 

Cross, LaNola Nashville 

( Jross, Ola M Jackson 

( Jrowe, M. Jeannette Dundee 

Crowley, Mabel Toledo, O. 

Crumb, Florence Walled Lake 

Culkins, Doris Albion 

( Jullin, Carolyn L Pontiac 

( ullen, Ethelwyn Belleville 

( Cunningham, Gertrude Morrice 

Curnow, Nydia Stambaugh 

Curtis, Dorothy Alice Manchester 

Curtis, Eva M Flint 

( Curtis, Gladys I , Parma 

Curtis, Mercedes Greenville, O. 

Cutcher, Floyd E Almont 

Daeubler, Anita M . A Monroe 

I )ailey, Helen Saginaw 

Dalton, Mary Elizabeth Yankton, So. Dakota 

Dansen, Eleanor A Chelsea 

Darling, Jennie Ypsilanti 

Davis, Bess Marie , Old Mission 

Davis, Jennie Ypsilanti 

Davis, Luella Ypsilanti 

Davis. Mable E Flushing 

Davis, Ninetta Ypsilanti 

Davis, Sadie J Saginaw 

Davison, Alice M Ypsilanti 

Dawson, Gladys Holloway 

Day, Mildred V Hudson 

Day, Percival S Ypsilanti 



260 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Decker, Garnett B Croswell 

Delaforce, Mrs. Mary Sanford Ypsilanti 

De Land, Beatrice Temperance 

De Land, Mrs. Harriet W Saginaw, W. S. 

Delaney, Esther Anne Linden 

Dell, Melvin E Saline 

DeLong, Alice Hesperia 

Demaree, Mrs. Alena Bay Adrian 

Demarest, Clara De Tour 

Demarois, Eleanor Calumet 

Dennis, Cora M Sandusky 

Densmore, Rhoda A Oscoda 

Depew, Myrtle Caro 

Derbyshire, Anna H Flint 

Derbyshire, Carl Manitou Beach 

Deny, Eunice H Gladstone 

Despres, Delia Alpena 

I )eters, Caroline Krause Ann Arbor 

De Yerna, Eulalie ( Jrass Lake 

De Vinny, Mona Bell Linden 

DeWaele, Marie Bay City 

De Walt, Carma East Canton, 0. 

De Walt, Ruth East Canton, (). 

I )icken, ( Jarrie L \nn Arbor 

Dickson, Mamie A St. Louis, Mo. 

Diem. Ethel 8 Saginaw 

Dixon, Ruby Salem 

Doering, 01<i;i E Grand Rapids 

Doherty, MarceUa Valley Center 

Dolan, Martha Lansing 

Dolbee, Marjorie Mason 

Domineck, Mayme C Ty re 

I tonley, Vera East Lansing 

I tonnan, Myrtle Lachine 

Donough, Helm J Seattle, Washington 

Donovan, Hannorah Cheboygan 

Dorr, Edna A Grass Lake 

Dotson, Georgia Ferrh Highland Park 

Dot; ( •'"'"' IlollovwiY 



STUDENTS 261 



Dover, Ruth G Mayville 

Downer, Mrs. Eunice M Montgomery 

Downing, Lillian Holly 

Downs, Elizabeth M Port Huron 

Doyle, Alice C Grand Rapids 

Doyle, Hugh Laingsburg 

Drouyer, Dorothy Yale 

Drummond, Anna Pigeon 

I hiBois, Margaret Mason 

Dubry, Mary E . . . . . Wyandotte 

Duby, Rose M Eastlake 

Du Lude, Cecilia Bay City 

Dunbrook, Marie Reading 

Dunham, Grace A Mt. Forest 

Dunning, Bonnie L , Midland 

Dunning, Ruth E Howell 

Durfee, Margaret Joyce Dexter 

Du Vail, Leo Eugene McBain 

Dwyer, Florence Hudson 

Dysinger, Mabel Ionia 

Earl, Ruth M Ypsilanti 

Easleck, Margaret Richmond 

East, Sophia Ann Arbor 

Ebner, Elizabeth Ann Arbor 

Eckenberger, Ella M Detroit 

Eckhart, Carl W Mason 

Eckles, Leona Ypsilanti 

Eddie, Fannie M Ann Arbor 

Edgerton, Ila M Allenton 

Edgett, Catherine Ludington 

Eggert, Laura A Saginaw 

Ehinger, Gladys Palmyra 

Elbing, Dorothea E Pigeon 

Elder, Gladys Petersburg 

Elder, Norine Mancelona 

Elgutter, Bernadine .' Toledo, O. 

Elliott, Beth Port Huron 

Elliott, Corabel Hudson 

Elliott, Eva .". Ypsilanti 



262 NORMAL poLLUGD KEAfi BOOK 

Elliott, Virginia Port Huron 

Ellis, Florence M Benzonia 

Ellsworth, Mrs. B, B Richmond 

Ellsworth, Wella Wayne 

Ellsworth, William A Wayne 

Elwood, M. Alice Flint 

Eppens, F. Hazel Ann Arbor 

Esch, Margaret Grass Lake 

Eseman, Edith Royal Oak 

Evans, Berneice , Vale 

Eveleth, Grace Corunna 

Everard, Cornelia Ypsilanti 

Everett, Clara Munisihg 

Everhart, Lelah B Flint 

Everill, Florence G Algonac 

Every, Maude S Brooklyn 

Fast, Mrs. Chas Montgomery 

Faulkner, Mary Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fay, Nettie L Holt 

Fee, Lena M Saginaw 

Feeley, Esther M Linden 

Feiner, Bertha Ann Arbor 

Feldkamp, Hulda M Manchester 

Ferguson, Alice M Cass City 

Ferguson, ( rertrude M Saginaw, W. S. 

Ferguson, Selma Cass City 

Ferrett, Winifred .- Jeddo 

I 'errigan, Elizabeth B Laingsbnrg 

Ferris, Laura E Scottville 

Pinari, Ann Detroit 

Fink, Lucille W Stockbridge 

Fischer, Emma Detroit 

Fish, Marguerite Otia 

1 isher, ( Irace B Rives Junction 

Fisher, Lena ' Dryden 

H^Iht, Mattie Dryden 

I ther Louise Clara \lbion 

Flagg, 'J heresa M East Jordan 

Fleming, Florence Porl Huron 



BTtJDENTS 263 



Fleming, Mrs. Mildred Brown Cass City 

Flenner, Lilon Detroit 

Fohey, Mary Theresa Ann Arbor 

Foley, Gertrude Luzerne 

Foote, F. Estella Bay City 

Ford, Minerva Evanston, 111. 

Foreman, Jane Ithaca 

Forsyth, Kenneth E Blissfield 

Foster, Beatrice Brown City 

Foster, Hiidreth Jane : . . Pigeon 

Foust, Elizabeth G Ithaca 

Fowler, Mrs. Virginia B Williamstown, W. Va. 

Franz, Pearle M Custer 

Eraser, Anna M , Cadillac 

Eraser, Edna Port Huron 

Fraser, Mabel M Cadillac 

Frazee, Inez M Lowell 

Fredenburg, Mae Pompeii 

Freer, Kathleen Metamora 

Fribley, Kate L Big Rapids 

Fribley, Sarah Big Rapids 

Frick, Eva .....* Ortonville 

Frith, Mae E Smith's Creek 

Fry, Burnetta J Fremont 

Fry, Kathleen Fremont 

Fry, Lucile Addison 

Fuester, Gertrude F Morrice 

Fulkerson, Bay Milan 

Fuller, J. Burns Kenton 

Fuller, May L Akron, O. 

Fuller, Mildred M Springport 

Fuller, Naomi B Bay City 

Fulmer, Florence Canton, (). 

Funsch, Ada Brighton 

Furgason, Edith B Manchester 

( ialbreath, Nellie V Highland Park 

Gallagher, Florence Bay City 

Gallagher, Ralph St. Johns 

Gallinger, Elizabeth A Niagara Fall?, N. Y. 



264 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Gallup, Edna Cambridge, O. 

Gallup, Florence Pinckney 

Gallup, Myrtle Pinckney 

Gannon, Mary F Crystal Lake, 111. 

Gardner, Margaret N Oscoda 

Garlock, Laura E Grand Ledge 

Garthe, Anna Northport 

Garvey, Minette Alpena 

Gayleard, Rhona M Morrell Park, Md. 

Gee, Russell L Ypsilanti 

Geer, F. Helen Ypsilanti* 

Geletzke, Emma A Trenton 

Gemmill, S. Lela Cass City 

Gerred, Corrinne Ashtabula. ( >. 

( ^estwite, Audrie Hudson 

( ribbons, Elizabeth 8 Alpena 

Gibbs, H. Britton Marion 

Giddings, Arthur Jerome 

Giegling, Helen Manistee 

( riffels, Marie Laingsburg 

Gifford, Helen B Detroit 

Gilbert, Marian J Moline 

Gilmaster, Ruth C Bay City 

( lilson, Mabel Deerneld 

( rleason, Mary Emmeti 

( rodfrey, Vera Perry 

dcke, Nina L Detroit 

Goetz ( rladye Goetzville 

( loodge, Bessie M Elba 

Goodhue, 1 Lorence A Lansing 

Go< dlock, M. < Jlyde Clayton 

( Soodrich, Lola Fenton 

Goppelt, Florence Chesaning 

Gordon, Lilah Seneca 

( lorman, Nettie M Saginaw 

Gracen, Maude J Salem 

( rraham, ( \ene\ ieve ( rene Mt. Pleasant 

Gramfl, ( rladys Milan 

( Irandjean, Ajina II Ileesc 



STUDENTS 20o 

Grant, John F Detroit 

( Irassley, Marguerite M Deerfield 

Graubner, Carrie Mayville 

( Iraves, Marjorie E Manistee 

( Ireen, Burtella Metamora 

( rreen, Edith M Dundee 

Greene, Hazel Goodells 

( rreening, Nina M Chelsea 

( rreenlee, Lloyd Deckerville 

Griffin, Ella Agnes Grand Rapids 

Grill, Mildred. . Elsie 

( lri<singer, Tenia .' Grass Lake 

( rroh, Ruth E Ann Arbor 

Grosvenor, Clifford Troy, O. 

( Irosvenor, Corinne Troy, O. 

( in svenor, Frances Troy, O. 

( ruder, Margaret Gertrude Saginaw 

Guinan, Catherine . Ypsilanti 

Guinan, Clare Ypsilanti 

Gullans, Lena Mass 

( rust, Willo ■ Morenci 

( lusl afson, Celia H . Oscoda 

Gustafson, Jennie E Oscoda 

Gwkin, Lillian Elkton 

Hacking, Ethel M Richmond 

Hackman, Florence Kingsley 

Hackwell, Mrs. Jean B Bad Axe 

Haclclon, Leone Holly 

Hagni, Zora . South Lyons 

Haight, Elbert Memphis 

Hall, Caroline E Pontiac 

Hal]', Emily L Hamilton, 111. 

Hall, Mrs. Etta Memphis 

Hall, Vira O Davisburg 

Hallahan, Mae A Fenwick 

Hallenbeck, Marguerite A Manitou Beach 

Hamilton, Chailotte Decker 

Hamilton, Helen Adrian 

Hammond, Floy E Ashley, Ind. 



266 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hansen, Gertrude H Manistee 

Hansen, Lillian Manistee 

Hansen, Marguerite * . . . : Howell 

Hansen, Thora E Manistee 

Hansor, William Ypsilanti 

Harrington, Eleanor Owosso 

Harris, Althea Pinconning 

Harris, Clara A Williamston 

Harris, Gussie Flint 

Harris, Helen L Romeo 

Harris, Ruth M Perry 

Harrow, Frieda Ann Arbor 

Harry, Beatrice C : Lapeer 

Hartson, Marjorie Memphis 

Hartwell, Hazel M., Milan 

Hartz, Lillian M., Bay Citj 

Harvey, G. Wellington : Fenton 

Harwood, Josephine ' Ionia 

Harwood, Paul D Tecumseh 

Haskins, Helen B Waterville, O. 

Hatch, Elizabeth Pontiac 

Hattersby, Margaret Saginaw 

Haven, Flora E Clio 

I [awken, Lillian Birmingham 

Hawkes, Velma Belleville 

Hawkins, Grace Plymouth 

Haynes, Pearl Hillsdale 

Eazelton, Vivian Pontiac 

Heath, Ruth F , Monroe 

Heattey, Esther R Detroit 

Heggemann, Mary Delphos, 0. 

Heilig, Alice G Palms 

Hemenway, Lucile N Deerfieid 

Hendee, Beulah M Blissfield 

Henderson) Mabel E Saginaw 

Hennink, Catherine Grand Rapids 

Hensen, Elwyn Tecumseh 

II' i) i n. Everetl Tecumseh 

Henzie, Catherine Manchester 



•TUDENTS 20 < 

Heibert, Marie Port Huron 

Hermann, Irene Calumet 

Hess, Beulah Vassar 

Hess, Orpha Vassar 

Hetfield, Mary W Flint 

Heusel Frances Hanover 

Hewes, Frances Hillsdale 

Hewitt, Dudley Petersburg 

Hibbard, Ernest L New Boston 

Hickey, Hazel Fairgrove 

Hicks, Alice Richmond 

Hirks, Bessie J Plymouth 

Hilborn, Clara M .Flint 

Hilderink, Ella Grand Haven 

Hill. Florence N .« Ann Arbor 

Hilliard, Margretta Alpena 

Hills, Elma Sandusky, O. 

Hines, Faith Auburn, Ind. 

Hitchcock, Helen Lansing 

Hoagland, Grace E Worthington, Ind. 

Hodges, A. Ethel Manitou, Beach 

Hodges, Goldie M Elsie 

Hodge, Grace E Highland Park 

Hodges, Mildred A Fenton 

Hodges, Zella M Fenton 

Hoelzer, Jeannette L ; Clinton 

Hoffman, Chester Oak Grove 

Hoffman, Margaret Morenci 

Hogle, Erwin Parma 

Holden, Signa R Elberta 

Holl, Amanda J Saginaw 

Hollister, L. Emma Auburn 

Hollopeter, Erma Waterloo, Ind. 

Holhvay, L. H Grand Rapids 

Holmes, Lavancha Eunice Dansvillc 

Holt, Tunie Shelby, O. 

Honigh, Mrs. Ada J Pontiac 

Hood, Georgia Alpena 

Hood, Mrs. Hazel Larkin (larkston 



268 NORMAL COLLEGE FEAR BOOK 

Hood, 0. C ' ( Marks;! on 

Hooper, Iva M Alma 

Hoover, Flora G Croton, 0. 

Hopkins, Ruth Addison 

Hornby, Grace Port Huron 

Horton, Alta M Marine City 

Horton, Bertha B Montrose 

Horton, Martha I Northville 

Hottenstein, Helen L Petersburg 

Houck, Anna E Riga 

Houle, Bernedette Harrisville 

Howlett, Florence N Chelsea 

Hoyt, Donna V Gaylord 

Hubbard, Susan M Port Huron 

Hudson, Alice E Marlette 

Hudson, Ula M Webbcrville 

Hudson, Grace Marlette 

Huested, Mildred Allen 

Huff, Gerald A ; Medina 

Huheey, F. Kate Covington, Ky. 

Huheey, Lilian Covington, Ky. 

Humphrey, Mary E Thompsonville 

Humphrey, Tryphena Thompsonville 

Hunt, Beatrice Lansing 

I hint, Mabel Baroda 

Hunter, Hazel , Flint 

Hurley, Margaret Cass City 

Huston, Josephine L * Detroit 

Hutchinson. Howard B Lake Linden 

Hutchison, Ina B Clayton 

I [yde, Bess L Port Huron 

IJyman, Marie Quincy 

Hyne, Mildred Brighton 

Hyney, Helena Ovvosso 

[nglesh, Gladys Barton City 

[ngram, ( Jharlotte Marine City 

[rvine, Elizabeth II Newark, 0. 

[sbister, Beatrice Port Huron 

[ves, Evah A Mass 






STUDENTS 269 

Ivory, Bessie E Goodrich 

Jackson, Bessie M Addison 

Jackson, II. Gertrude Paw Paw 

Jackson, Stella Caro 

Jaitner, Julia Manistee 

James, Ella M Calumet 

Jameson, Cora Ypsilanti 

Jameson, Mildred R Fairgrove 

Janney, Bessie B Dundee 

Jarka, Elizabeth Manistee 

Jarvis, Vida B Ypsilanti 

Jelinek, Mildred Detroit 

.Jenison, Marvel E - Bath 

Jenkins, Elizabeth Addison 

Jensen, Golda E Boyne City 

Jensen, Silvia E Boyne City 

Jentoft, Helen W Manistee 

Jessup, Dorothy Helen Ypsilanti 

Jewell, Ruth Fremont 

Jobe, Myrtle Brown City 

Johnson, Cornelia Ann Arbor 

Johnson, Edythe L Iron Mountain 

Johnson, Ella A Manistee 

Johnson, Ruby Corunna 

Johnson, William L Flint 

Jones, Florence Petoskey 

Jones, Helen Holly 

Jones, Joel L. A Newark, O. 

Jones, Josina A Harbor Springs 

Jones, Marion R Manistee 

Jones, Vera Mae West Branch 

Jorae, Edith Ovid 

Jose, Esteban L Dumaquete, Phil Islands 

Josephson, Alice Ironwood 

Judge, Helen Alma 

Kapnick, George C Palmyra 

Kaufman, Hazel Richmond 

Kaufman, Lydia Coldwator 

Keck, Hulda M Rochester 



270 NOBMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Keeler, Mrs. Layton Washington 

Keen, Emma V. W Pontiac 

Keene, Mabel Dundee 

Keep, Kathryne . .Coldwater 

Keillor, Grace M Elkton 

Keillor, Hazel M Elkton 

Keller, Yelera Howell 

Kelkim, Mary Efhe Lansing 

Kelly, Marie Gurnee, 111. 

Kelly, Nettie B Sandusky 

Kemp, Lillian Towola 

Kempster, Carrie Coldwater 

Kcnel, Rose \hmeek 

Kennedy, Lillian Snover 

Kennedy, Rhoda C St. Clair 

Kenyon, Dorothy Poi tland 

Ken}'on, L. A. Ruth Detroit 

Kenyon . Sadie Dundee 

Kerr, Ethel R Lowell 

Kerr, Phoebe C Detroit 

Kibble, Edith Virginue Reedsville, O. 

Kile, Sadie Caro 

Kimpton, Eva C Grand Haven 

Kimpton, Laura E Grand Haven 

Kincaid, Faye Horsey 

King, Geraldine L Canton, (). 

Kinlcy, Mildred E St. Johns 

Kiiit igh, ( Ida Reading 

Kirchhofer, Julia Ann Arbor 

Klahn, Nellie Clarksville 

Kieinsmith, Lioyd C Stockbndge 

Kline Anna Jackson 

Klockziem, Minerva B Laingsburg 

Klotz, Edith Lucile Hammond, Ind. 

Knaak, Elfrieda G Deerfield, 111. 

Knappertz, Esther Canton, 0. 

Knight, Oda Adrian 

Knight, Thelma M Hanover 

Koehn, [rene M Capac 



STUDENTS 2, I 

Koppelman, Luella M Ottawa Lake 

Korn, Catherine C Ludington 

Krause, Ortall Saginaw 

Kregel, Minnie Muskegon 

Kreimann, Vera Saginaw 

Krohn, Kathryn Hilliards, (). 

Kronlund, Elna Oscoda 

Kronlund, Sadie Oscoda 

Kuhn, Pauline A Morrice 

Kurth, Gertrude M Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Kuster, Myrtle A Manistee 

La Barge, Mrs. O.J Ann Arbor 

La Batt, Maurine C Mesick 

Lafferty, Nina Cadiz, O. 

La Forge, Harriette G Mt. Clemens 

La Forge, Kathryn Mt. Clemens 

La Fountain, Cecilia V . Monroe 

Lahaie, Anne Escanaba 

Lambert, Mabel C Columbiaville 

Lampkin, Paul H Ypsilanti 

Lanahan, Gertrude Ionia 

Lancaster, Dorothy Parma 

Lane, Leslie C Addison 

Lang, Violet Newberry 

Lankton, Hazel De Witt 

Lansing, Lulu ' . . . . Brooklyn 

Lantis, Cecil Perry 

Larkins, Zenaide E Salem 

Laskey, Gladys Harbor Beach 

Laubrcher, Helen K Grand Rapids 

Laughlin, Liva Horton 

Lawler, Alice E Smith Creek 

Lawrence, Mabel R Milan 

Lawrence, Maude Pontiac 

Lawson, George N Milan 

Lawson, Vera M. (Mrs.) Milan 

Lay, Elizabeth Williamston 

Leavitt, Dorothy M Alpena 

Lee, Dorothy L Ypsilanti 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 



Lee, Ethel D Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Lee, Loretta Oscoda 

Lee, Mildred A Ypsilanti 

Leece, Frances Ortonville 

Leete, A. Marion Highland Park 

Leib, Floyd I Adrian 

Leisenring, Jennie H Lansing 

Leitch, Alexandra Ubly 

Leland, Deyo S Ypsilanti 

Lemmon, Pauline • Litchfield 

Lenheiser, J. Reuben . . . Evart 

Leverett, Lucile Ann Arbor 

Lewis, Mrs. Ada Memphis 

Lewis, Earl A Memphis 

Lewis, Mrs. N. A Detroit 

Liggett, Olive F Dundee 

Linck, Gladys G Brown City 

Lindeneau, Frederic W Grand Rapids 

Linekar, Mabel Imlay City 

Lipscomb, Lorna I Lake Odessa 

Lipsey, Elsie Charlotte 

Little, Mildred L Port Huron 

Lockwood, Iva Caro 

Lockwood, Shirley Williamston ' 

Long, Dulah O Davison 

Long, Mary E Newark, O. 

Loomis, Enid Elizabeth Onsted 

Lord. Charlotte Virginia Kalamazoo 

Love, Lucile Ypsilanti 

Lowe, Lucille Britton 

Lowing, ( rlenna Traverse City 

Lownsbury, Mabel C Birmingham 

Lownsbury, Nellie Ann Arbor 

Lucas, Irene E Romeo 

Lundbom, Emma Manistee 

Lundeen, Ruth Lansing 

Lundstrum, Ethel E Manistique 

Lundy, Lillian S Plymouth 

Lundy, Mabel Yale 



STUDENTS 273 



Lutz, Margaret Yale 

Lyman, Eleanor Concord 

Lynch, Elizabeth Greenville, O. 

Lynch, Henry J Gaylord 

Lyon, Pearl Waldron 

Lytic, Ethel Morriscy Farmington 

Maddough, Florence Boyne City 

Maddough, Nelle S Boyne City 

Maddough, Winnifred Boyne City 

Madill, Mildred . . .Bay City 

Maginn, Mary Mt. Morris 

Majefsky, Minnie '. Novi 

Malloy, Bertha Cambridge, O. 

Maltas, Ethel Mae SaultSte. Marie 

Manchester, Nola. Ypsilanti 

Mann, Mary Fairmont, W. Va. 

Manor, Blanche Alta Ann Arbor 

Manor, Mildred Rosa Ann Arbor 

Manson, Sophia St. Ignace 

Mapes, Lena Maye Onsted 

Marble, Frances Lillian Muskegon 

Marion, Clara Lansing. 

Marschke, Emily R Ann Arbor 

Marshall, Vera ! Oak Grove 

Martin, Beulah S Pinckney 

Martin, Irene L Homer 

Martin, Jennie^ P '.' Manchester 

Martin, Lulu Grand Ledge 

May, Helen Isabel Horton 

Maynard, Corabell Hesperia 

McAndless, Blanche Capac 

Mar- Arthur, Catherine m Cheboygan 

McCall, Eleanor Pontiac 

McCarron, Alice Port Huron 

McCarter, Flossie Gagetown 

McCauley, Helen Richmond 

McClatchie, Myrtle Grace . Ludington 

McClaughry, Isca Ypsilanti 

McClellan, Clara E Holland 

35 



274 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

McClellan, Ruth C Holland 

McCloskey, Esther Chelsea 

McClumpha, Genevieve H Plymouth 

McClung, Alberta Parkersburg, W. Va. 

McComb, Mildred Vassar 

MacConnell, Jane Tecumseh 

McCordie, H. Grace Royal Oak 

McCormick, Catherine J Birch Run 

McCoy. Inis R Alma 

McCready, Zoa L Flint 

McCrumb, Muriel Eagle 

McCulloch, Ida Catherine Beaverton 

MacDonald, Jane E Bad Axe 

MacDonaki, Sharlot Deckerville 

MaeDougall, Hilda Brown City 

MaeDougall, Lorraine Brown City 

McGregor, Mae Ann Arbor 

McHenry, M. Hanna Lansing 

Mcllvcnna, Nina Harbor Beach 

Mcintosh, Myrtle A Millersburg 

Mclntyre, Edith Bay City 

McKeachie, Ahce Holly 

McKenhey, Margaret , Yale 

MacKenzie, Margaret Alpena 

McKisson, Lulu Mary Sistersville, W. Va. 

McKnight, Helen Concord 

MacLarty, Kathryn ( r Cass City 

McLaughlin, Frances I{ Hammond, Ind. 

McLennan, Isabelle Harbor Beach 

McLennan, Mabel Dundee 

McMahon, Josephine Pulaski 

MacMillan, Geraldine Muskegon 

McMonagle, Bessie Metamora 

MacNeil, Laura Ypsilanti 

McRoy, Kva Marlette 

McRoy, Vera Marlette 

McVean, Etta M Pontiac 

McWain, Gladys Deckervilto 

McWilliams, Mabel A Bay City 



STUDENTS 270 

Mead, Zelma Roscommon 

Meehan, Catherine D Port Huron 

Meikle, Lydia Yale 

Melson, Audrey Michigan City, Ind. 

Menard, Clara M L'Anse 

Meredith, Mildred Allen 

Merrell, Elizabeth Roberts Ypsilanti 

Mersman, Fann}' Grand Rapids 

Meston, Lalia Irene Gaylord 

Meston. Lelia Wyandotte 

Metcalf, Lorna Leslie 

Meyer, Julia Alpena 

Middleditch, Emma G Detroit 

Mikkelsen, Mabel " : Montague 

Miles, Henna Fayette, O. 

Miller, Allene F Dundee 

Miller, Blanehe F Sandusky 

Miller, Edna Rochester 

Miller, Elsie M Mt. Clemens 

Miller, Gertrude B Sandusky 

Miller, Helen Rose Chelsea 

Miller, Julian Belding 

Miller, V. Lucille Milford 

Miller, Thelma Gladys Newark, O. 

Miller, Viola Parma 

Millett, Ethel A Armada 

Millhisler, Genevieve Perry 

Milligan, Elnora B Parma 

Millis, Frances L Traverse City 

Millis, Mrs. Mary L Traverse City 

Mills, Winifred Okemos 

Mitchell, Irene . . . . „. . * Belleville 

Mittler, Marie L Dearborn 

Moffatt, Mary Linnell Traverse City 

Mogk, Eugenie Ann Arbor 

Mogle, Catherine Monroe 

Mohrhardt, Nellie Saline 

Molloy, Theresa Saginaw 

Monaghan, Katherine Emmett 



27b' NORMAL COLLEGE YEA It BOOK 

Mbnaghan, Mary . . Emmet t 

Monaghan, Susan M Alpena 

Monahan, Margaret Brighton 

Monks, M. Lela Pinckney 

Montgomery, Stella Marlette 

Monzo, Marie Croswell 

Moody, Lucy Holland 

Moore, Arabelle Hastings 

Moore, Blanche Cromwell, Ind. 

Moore, Hazel Otter Lake 

Moore, Hazel L ; Dundee 

Moore, Lelia A Moundsville, W. Va. 

Moore, Martin R Ypsilanti 

Moore, Maude M North Branch 

Moran, Cecelia L Traverse City 

Morari, Ethel Jackson 

Moran, Helen Escanaba 

Morgan, Lottie Bad Axe 

Morhous, Portia Ypsilanti 

Morris, Clytie M Alpena 

Morris, Edna Hudson 

Morse, Marguerite E Sand Creek 

Mosier, Mabel G Saginaw, W. S. 

Moss, Ethel . . Lennon 

Moss, Helen Aldruda Flint 

Motz, Ella Pigeon 

Mox, Clara Kingsley 

Mox, Etta Kingsley 

Mulholland, Mrs. Ferae (r Ann Arbor 

Mullen, Georgianna Ypsilanti 

Murdick, Kathryne . # Potterville 

Murphy, Irma Jane •. Kalkaska 

Murray, ( Ihrjstine A Alma 

Murray, Rose E \lma 

Mu6bach, Bessie I Munith 

Musgrave, Mabel McMillan 

Musolf, Elsie TawasCity 

ken, Albert II Grand Rapids 

Myers, Lottie \ Niagara Tails, \\ Y. 



STUDENTS . L>77 

Myres, Janice Jackson 

Nelson, Florence Greenville 

Nelson, Mrs. George Flint 

Nelson, Mabel Margaret Ludington 

Nelson Mary Hudson 

Neptune, Elizabeth A Marietta, O. 

Nethereott, Blanche Orion 

Netzorg. Amelia Detroit 

Neumann, Elizabeth Marlette 

Neverth, Mrs. Albert Manchester 

Neville, Genevieve R Muskegon 

Newcomb, Berniece Ypsilanti 

Newell, Florence E Plymouth 

Newell, Mygleetes L Jackson 

Newton, Geraldine Ypsilanti 

Newton, Pearl H Ypsilanti 

Newton, Ruth . . Hunters Creek 

Niblick, Eunice Jackson 

Nichol, Lila Elkton 

Nickless, Beulah Fairgove 

Niebling Emma C Okemos 

Nielsen, Lillia H Muskegon 

Xiet hammer, Lorena Dansville 

Xiles, Mrs. Louise B Ann Arbor 

Nims, Irma .- ' Leslie 

Xold, Grace Flint 

Northrup, Eunice M Lawrence 

Norton, Isabel E Harbor Beach 

Nott, Mildred A Ann Arbor 

Nowery, Chella Bly Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Nowlin, Gladys Roscommon 

Nugent, Margaret Bad Axe 

Nunn, Robert J Croswell 

Nye, Hazel Hudson 

O'Brien, Fronie Alpena 

O'Brien, May E Ypsilanti 

< )'Dell, Hattie Brown City 

Odell, Olive . ..Clinton 

Olrich, Zenobia C Ottawa Lake 



278 NORMAL -COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Olsen, Esther M Frankfort 

Opferrnann, Freda Monroe 

O'Rourke, James Y* .' Detroit 

Orr, Dorothy M Milan 

Osgood, Susan Miriam Monroe 

Otis, Edna Charlotte 

Oustcrhout, Travers Tawas City 

Ott, Lucinda Grass Lake 

Owen, Dorothy E Lapeer 

Oxner, Aida M • .Flint 

Pace, Amy E Port Huron 

Packer, Yhay Almont 

Padfield, Mary M . St. Clair 

Page, Virginia . . Ypsilanti 

Pahl, Mildred I Ypsilanti 

Pahotski, Minnie Fort Smith, Ark. 

Paine, Ada M Ypsilanti 

Palmer, Cora A Vermillion, 0. 

Palmer, Leah Milan 

Palmer, Louisa F Brooklyn 

Palmer, Mrs. Olive Blissfield 

Palmitef, Arlia A : Milan 

Parant, Gladys V Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Parker, Marion E Grand Blanc 

Parkhill, Vera Mt. Pleasant 

Parks, Ruth M Birmingham 

Parslow, Floyd M Williamston 

Parson, Howard E Smiths Creek 

Parsons, Bertha May Ypsilanti 

Pasch, Hilda St. Johns 

Patoii, Grace Almont 

Patterson, Chas. C Port Huron 

Paul, Helen Margaret . . .' Han Claire 

Paid, Marguerite Linden 

Paul, Mildred Montgomery 

Paulin, Alberta 8 Bay City 

Paxton, Emma Michigan City, Ind. 

Payne, Rena M Capac 

P< rce, Mary Jane Bad Axe 



STUDENTS 270 



Peck, Gertrude May Ann Arbor 

Peese, Mabel Romeo 

Pell, Geraldine Howell 

Penoyar, Nelle Bangor 

Perkins, Florence N Sparta 

Perkins, Marion F Lake Odessa 

Perry, S. M . . . . Williamsburg 

Person, Amy Manistee 

Peters, Elfa Saline 

Peterson, Alma Natalie Adrian 

Peterson, Ellen A Adrian 

Peterson, Gerda A Kewadin 

Pew, Reah Evelyn Ypsilanti 

Pfisterer, Matilda Christine Ann Arbor 

I Phelps, Louise Mayville 

! Phillipp, Gertrude Belh ire 

j Phillips, Ethel Clarkston 

i Phillips, Idella Willie. . . St. Louis, Mo. 

Phillips, Isabelle Lapeer 

■ Phipps, Hilton Otisville 

J Pickett, Mildred Leslie 

Pierce, Edna M Emmet 

Pierce, Emily C Bay City 

Pierce, Grace C Flint 

Pierce, Norma M Memphis 

Pierce, Vernon P Memphis 

Pittenger, Theda Milford 

Piatt, Raye R ." Marine City 

jPlowfield, Delta Ithaca 

I Poe, Alliene ; Ypsilanti 

I Poling, Eva M Hudson 

iPollok, Ruth B Dansville 

Pcmella, Ella Minden City 

jPond, Elizabeth Owosso 

Porritt, Asenath L Pontiac 

Porter, Irene Mae Milford 

Porter, Vivian Leonard 

Post, Marian D -....' Mason 

Potrude, Olive Cadillac 



280 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR HOOK 

Potter, Ruth Ann Port Huron 

Power, Frieda Addison 

Powers, Ethel Vermontville 

Powrie, M. Alice St, Clair 

Prescott, Florence Eaton Rapids 

Pretti, Lena Irene Corunna 

Priddy, Frances Ypsilanti 

Priestley, Irene Akron 

Pringle, Edna E 7 Sandusky 

Prisk, Irene M Houghton 

Proctor, Anna Margaret Mansfield, O. 

Profrock, Mabell M Ortonville 

Purcell, Nona Birch Run 

Pyrtle, Mary Renee Oklahoma City, Okla, 

Quigley, Elizabeth Sistersville, W. Va. 

Quinn, Alice M Kenosha, Wis. 

Rackuth, Augusta Saginaw, W. S. 

Radeke, Clara Saginaw, W. S. 

Radkey, Elsie ' Bhssfield 

Rae, Edna A Essexville 

Rainey, Blanche Allen 

Ralph, Margaret Morrice 

RamsdeU, Maude . Hanover 

Randall, Mary M \rmada 

Randolph, Mrs. Harriet E Coldwatcr 

Ranels, LettillaV Winchester, Ky. 

Ranger, Amos J Northport 

Rauschenbach, Sarah .• LaPorte, Ind. 

Ravell, Mary Ann • Lansing 

Ray, Fern M Metamora, 0. 

Raymond, Jeanette Manteno, 111. 

Raymond, Myrtia M Adrian 

Elead, Mina L Hillsdale 

Reamer, Claribel South Lyon 

Reed, Jessie M Bay City 

Reid, Clarence J Wayne 

Redlin, Minnie Deerfield 

Reed, Daisj . Vassal 

Reid, Florence G. . . Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 281 



Reinhardt, Flora Boston Ann Arbor 

Reiser, Leora Clinton 

Renehan, Olive M Round Lake, 111. 

Requa, Amy C Corunna 

Rel t ig, Anna Mansfield, O. 

Rexford, Florence 5 . . . .Manitou Beach 

Reynolds, John T Berville 

Rice, ( )rrin S Pellston 

Rich, Clinton H Deerfield 

Rich, Irene McGregor 

Richards, Cora : Ishpeming 

Richards, Mabel I Moscow 

Richards, Ruby B McGiegor 

Richardson, Mabel Lansing 

Richardson, Mae Roscommon 

Richardson, Olive Napoleon 

Richert, Barbara Rose . Bay City 

Richmond, Alda Fenton 

Richmond, Ezra Ortonville 

Richter, Lilia M Saginaw 

Ridenour, Ellen M St. Johns 

Rider, Ersyl D Howell 

Ridge, Irene Margaret Cedar Springs 

Ridley, Minnie B . . . Otisville 

Riemenschneider, Clara Chelsea 

Riemenschneider, Hilda Chelsea 

Riggleman, Ethel Fairmont, W. Va. 

Riggs, Kathryn J Belleville 

Riley, Nona A Weston 

Rinehart, DeVere M ] Union 

RiDgel, Minnie E Manistee 

Risden, Gladys A Vermilion, O. 

Robards, Clarabell Chelsea 

Roberts, Bessie M Waldron 

toberts, Gertrude L Willis 

toberts, Margaret C ■ Ypsilanti 

Kobertson, Lulu Lansing 

tobinson, Beatrice R Attica 

Robinson, Pearl Mc K Saginaw 



NORM A J, COLLEGE r»AK BOOK 



Robinson, Persis S Traverse City 

Robinson, M. Sylvia Cedar Springs 

Robison, Lillian Jano Ann Arbor 

Robson, Janet Bridgeport, Conn. 

Rock, Meta M Saginaw, W. S. 

Rodal, Christine S Frankfort 

Rodlam, lone North xAdams 

Roe, Ernestine Plymouth 

Rogers, Bernice Lansing 

Rogers, Ruth Tipton 

Rohlf , Madeline Akron 

Rohman, Lillie Owosso 

Rohrabacher, Genevieve Oak Grove 

Ronan, Marguerite C Palmer 

Rooker, Ada Ypsilant i 

Roscoe, Mabel Nashville 

Roskey, Eva N Ypsilanti 

Rossman, Vera Howell 

Roth, Adolph J Clarksville 

Rothwell, Anna Saginav 

Rounsifer, Mabel Belleville 

Rouse, Faye Martha Harbor Springs 

Rowan, Ethel Parma 

Rowe, Lois A Milford 

Rowley, F. Pearl Laingsburg 

Rowley, Sadie Laingsburg 

Ruddock, Olive M : Attica 

Rucfisiler, Alma Clinton 

Runneils, Mabel Rochester 

Runyan, Mary Ellen Mansfield, 

Russell, Alice Oscodfl 

Russell, Jose phine Ann Arboi 

Russell, Mina O Salini 

Ryan, ( iertrude Howell 

Ryan, Margaret Kscanaba 

Ryan, Ruth Detroit 

Saffell, Dorothy Milai 

Sampson, Margueretta Kind' 

Samulski, Roho Manistei 



STOOfiNTS 283 

Sanderson, Blanche Quincy 

Sangren, Mrs. Flossie Clio 

Sangren, Paul V Clio 

Sangster, Teressa Decker 

Sarles, Alice Allen 

Sat tier, Katherine Charlotte 

S;it tier, Marion Charlotte 

Saunders, Mrs. S. H Detroit 

Saur Helen Newark, O. 

Sayler, Bernice E Big Rapids 

Sayles, Ola Bernice Frankfort 

Scheid, Laura A Manchester 

Schlicher, Lee R Laingsburg 

Schmid, Dorothy M Petersburg 

Schmid, Emily Louise : Dexter 

Schmid, Florence B Ann Arbor 

Schneider, Esther J Washington 

Schneider, Lela Bertha. . . Washington 

Schoepflin, Ruth Marine City 

Schroder, Marion A Plymouth 

Schryer, Rachel L Flint 

Schuknecht, Mrs. Christina Corunna 

Schultz, Erma Blissfield 

Schultz, Mary E Petersburg 

Schultz, Pearl Reading 

Schultz, Ruth E Ypsilanti 

Schulze, Edna M Nashville 

Schuman, Adela Bay City 

Schupman, Hilda L Dundee 

Schutz, Rose F Durand 

Bchwader, Vada Freeport 

Scofield, Loraine . . .Leslie 

Scott, Bernice AI Brown City 

Scol t , Margaret H Ashtabula, 0. 

Scott, Marguerite Vanderbilt 

Myra Hamilton, Ind. 

Secord, Genevieve E Leonard 

Selberg, Viola H Pontiac 

^lby, Lelah X. . Elba 



284 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Selden, Blanche Pontiac 

Selesky, Inez E Grand Blanc 

Sellers, Martha Akron 

Semark, Bernice -. Clinton 

Senglaub, Blanche Highland Park 

Sewell, Harriette J Ann Arbor 

Sexton, Alice L Durand 

Shaffer, Alary F Lansing 

Shample, Winnie Prattville 

Shaner, Hazel A Petersburg 

Shankland, Mildred Ann Arbor 

Shannon, Ina M Brighton 

Shaver, Charlotte B Terre Haute, Ind, 

Shawley, Laura „ Ypsilanti 

Sherwood, Dorothy Kalkaska 

Sherwood, Edna Kalkaska 

Shields, Ruth E Gaylord 

Sibley, Bertrand Fay Saginaw, W. S. 

Silman, Gladys Farming-ton 

Simmons, ( rrace Schell North Branch 

Simon, Barbara Blissfield 

Simonds, Adeline West Dover, 0. 

Sipperley, Bethel Rochester 

Sipple, Brynina M Cedar Springs 

Skadan, Genevieve Lansing 

Skeels, Jennie Whitehall 

Skelley, Alice Vassar 

Skelley, E. Nina Vassar 

Slattery, Marie North Branch 

Small, Hazel J. (Mrs.) Highland Park 

Smalley, Rosalind Muskegon Heights 

Smelt zer, Margaret . .Petoskey 

Smith, Alice R Stockbridge 

Smith, Anah I :ik Rapids 

Smith, Anna A Quincy, III. 

Smith, Anna I Monroe 

Smith, Annabel! Brown City 

Smith Clara L Britton 

Smith. Donald K South Lyon 



STUDENTS 285 



Smith, Doris M Milan 

Smith, Etha L Owosso 

Smil li, Floyd L Cedar Springs 

Smith, Freida Flushing 

Smith, Gertrude Canton, (). 

Smith, Irene Howell 

Smith, Julia C Saginaw 

Smith, Mildred Belleville 

Smith, Ruth Ann Ionia 

Smith, Sarah Quincy, 111. 

Smith, L. Winifred Elkton 

Suavely, Inez .' Charlotte 

Snook, Homer B Almont 

Snyder, Edna Lavonia Ann Arbor 

Snyder, Regina Fowler 

Sontag, Lillian Cheboygan 

Soule, Sara M Sterling 

Sparrow, Mildred : Ypsilanti 

Spears, Emma M Pontiac 

Speer, Robert K. S Minden .City 

Spees, Thelma Boyne City 

Spencer, Xelie E Ovid 

Spiegelberg, H. Ruth Chelsea 

Spitler, Barbara Charlotte 

Spooner, Ethel Battle Creek 

Sprague, Julia A Marne 

Spring, Lillian Alabaster 

Springborn, Ethel Sarah Romeo 

Squires, Mrs. Cynthia Highland Park 

Stat ts, Justina E Dollar Bay 

Staeb, Minnie Ann Arbor 

Staley, Vivian Pauline Sistersville, W. Va. 

Stanard, Erma Detroit 

Stark, Ida G Saginaw, W. S. 

Starks, Martha . Ypsilanti 

Starkweather, Ruth I Birch Run 

Starr, ( Uadys I Grand Ledge 

Staup, Lydia Elizabel h Jasper 

lair, Gladys Marine City 



286 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Steams, Elizabeth Saginaw 

Steele, Victoria A Negaunee 

Stenson, Helen Elaine Covington j 

Stephenson, Francis North Branch 

Stephenson, Leone North Branch 

Stevens, Helen Mancelona 

Stevenson, Fern Vassar 

Steward, Mavia Rochester 

Stewart, Clara B Pontiac 

Stewart, Nella Roberta Columbus, 0. 

Stewart, Ruth E .' Hillsdale 

Stichler, .Marian Laingsburg 

Stinchcomb, Bina Sunfield 

Stinchcomb, Olga E Sunfield I 

Stock, Emma M Elba 

Stoner, Alice Fowlervillc 

St. Onge, (Mine De Tour 

Storms, Graden Davison 

Storner, Emelia Ithaca 

Stoutenburg, Vera A *• Snover 

Strand, Lily Y Stambaugh 

Strege, E. Lida Flint | 

Streng, Alvena M Plymouth i 

Striffler, Florence Cass City 

Stroud, Edna M Akron 

Stuart, Beatrice C Bennington 

Si urges, Christine Vnn Arbor 

Bturgis, MaryG Rockfordi 

Sturm,, Luella Rosena Saline 

Stutz, Caroline Alice Goshen, Ind 

Sullivan, Lila L Shelby 

Sundberg, Violette Ypsilanti 

Susterka, Stella Belleville 

Sutton, Clare M Blaintj 

Sutton, [nez Sarah '^n Arbor 

Svang, Lillian A Alpenn 

Swaine, Jessie C Ypsilanti 

anson, Olga A Manistetl 

rtout, Gladys M Laingsbunl 






STUDENTS 287 



Sweet, Ora A Flint 

Swick, Velma B Britton 

Swingle, Leona Muriel Manistique 

Sylvester, Alma Richmond 

Tabor, Carmen I Ypsilanti 

Tainer, Clara C Manistee 

Tainer, Elsie E Manistee 

Tait, Pearl E Fairgrove 

Tanner, Stanley J Charlotte 

Tate, Alfred Hay Grandvillc 

Taylor, Edna J Port Huron 

Taylor, Rachel E Lansing 

Taylor, Ruth C Caro 

Tebay, Bernice i Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Tfefft, Edith Mary Ypsilanti 

Teller, Orabelle Howell 

Tenhaaf, Mable C Grand Rapids 

f cnhaaf, Mildred M Grand Rapids 

Tennant, Marion S Essexville 

Theakei , Julia Bad Axe 

Thiol, Malita H Dearborn 

Thorn, Margaret H Port Huron 

Thomas, Anna B St. Louis, Mo. 

Thomas, Beryl S Pontiac 

Thomas, Nancy E Ypsilanti 

Thompson, Elizabeth Pittsford 

Thompson, Vera Eloise Greenville 

Threadgould, Francis A New Boston 

Tiffin, Ermah Plymouth 

Titmus, Dea Fowlerville 

Titsworth, Agnes Walker ■ .« Lapeer 

Todd, Edith M Lulu 

rorrant, Marrian . , Parma 

iown, Alice Parma 

Townsend, Kitt M Greenville, O. 

Townsend, Velma M Hudson 

wrfelet, Ethel Laurium 

Vavis, Ethel Howard Arcadia 

Jslfa, Lucy M Al))ona 



288 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAH BOOK 

Tremain, Keith A . . .Petersburg 

Trimble, Margaret Cheboygan | 

Tripp, Eva B Caro j 

Trudeau, Stella Manteno, 111. 

True, Tressa Bad Axe 

Tucker, Mabel E Saline 

Turnbull, Esther Deckerville 

Tuerner, Lillian A. Saginaw 

Twing, Mamie Kalkaska 

Twitchell, Ruby E Dimondale 

Tyler, Myrta Vermont ville 

Ulrich, Ethyle A Yalej 

Underhill, Gertrude L Bellaire 

Underbill, Hazel V Salem 

Underhiil, Helen S ■ Salem 

Underwood, Gladys Britton 

VaH, Irena M Chelsea 

Valade, Beatrice Ba Y Cit y 

Van Amberg, Mildred C Ann Arbor 

Van Antwerp, L. B Ann Arbo 

Vandawaker, Theron C Metamora 

Van De Walker, Cora Stevensville 

Van Enam, Marie Zeeland 

Van Horn, Verna Battle Creeh 

Van Tassel, Ruth : Pontiac 

Vamtine, Mildred Davison 

Van Tol, Caroline Grand Haven 

Van Velzar, Beulah Lansing 

Varty, Violel Palms 

Veach, Mary I Columbus, Ind. 

Vedder, Almon Wlllls 

Vedder, Ollen M willis 

VerHoef, Kate G ™ nd Haven 

Verwey, Dorothy C; rand Haven 

Vickers, Laura M Caro 

Vilehauer, Louise Vpsilanti 

Vote, Gertrude Montr< 

Vote, Hilda Montiose 

Voorhees, Mr Rub: Coldwatei 



STUDENTS 289 

Votzke, Irene Addison 

Waack, Loretta Farmington 

Wadsworth, Rachel J Petersburg 

Wagner, C. May Lansing 

Waldorf, Minerva Toronto, Canada 

Waldron, Zella ..." Coldwater 

Walker, Venus V Wayne 

Wallace, Allison Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Edna Carsonville 

Walsh, Nellie L Grand Rapids 

Walsh, Nettie L Lansing 

Walter, Ruberta F Holt 

Walz, Marian N Stockbridge 

Ward, Clara Ann Arbor 

Wardvvell, Cornelia Lansing 

Ware, Mrs. Dell Hooper Middletown, O. 

Ware, Hazel G . . . Brown City 

Wark, Altha Melvin 

Warner, Flossie M Reading 

Warner, Iva J Otisville 

Warner, Mabel E Otisville 

iWashburn, Nellie M Saginaw 

Waterbury, Edna M Ionia 

Waters, Mrs. O. M Holly 

Waters, Violet Montgomery 

Watson, Lorene '. Alpena 

^Vay, Sadie Margaret Grand Rapids 

Vearne, Elizabeth Allegan 

Weaver, Jean Kingston 

Yeaver, Marjorie Charlevoix 

Veaver, Thelma L Flushing 

Veber, Sylvia L Elkton 

Vebster, Gwendolyn Ypsilanti 

Veitbrecht, Emma C Ann Arbor 

peitzel, Alice Bad Axe 

\ r elch, Howard Marlette 

|relch, Pearl B Gaylord 

pells, Alfreda Belding 

/ells, Dorothy E Dryden 

37 



290 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wells, A. Marie Caro 

Wertenberger, Grace E Monroe 

Werth, Helen Armada 

Wesala, Ina Gladys Ironwood 

Westcott, Waive North Adams 

Weston, Mabel Lapeer 

Weter, Grace Richmond 

Welters, Alice Amelia Kawkawlin 

Wheaton, Julia . Devil's Lake 

Wheeler, Caroline A Ann Arbor 

Wheeler, Mrs. D. W Lewiston 

Wheeler, Gertrude M. (Mrs.) Ypsilanti 

Whelan, Marjorie Marie Ann Arbor 

Whipple, Mrs. Mary E Sebewaing 

Whipple, Ruth Sebewaing 

Whitchurch, Carl L Centralia, 111. 

Whit comb, Lena Hillsdale 

White, Alice E Howell 

White, Anne M Saginaw 

White, Edithe C Manchester 

White, John G Shelby 

White, Marion L Marshall 

White, Metta A . Dundee 

White, W. D Highland 

Whiteley, Katherine Klyde Greenville, 0. 

Whiteman, Lillian Estella Ann Arbor 

Whitman, Gordon C Petersburg 

\\ hitmore, Madge Eagle 

Wickstrom, Milma Detroit 

\\ ldmer, Wilma Auburn 

Wiese, Florence C Fair Haven 

Wight, 1 lorence Muskegon 

Wilcox, Anne W Pinckney 

Wilcox, Edgar II Traverse City 

Wilcox, Ora Lansing 

Wildern, Edna Port Huron 

Wilker, Clara Cleveland, 0. 

Wilkins, Laura Republic 

WUkfl, Myrtle M. Yale 



STUDENTS 291 

Williams, Fannie C Biloxi, Miss. 

Williams, Lurissa Owosso 

Williams, R. Marguerite Caro 

Williams, D. May . . Lansing 

Williams, Saidee M . . . Flint 

Williamson, Ethel Marie .McBrides 

Williamson, James Ypsilanti 

Wilson, Besse Mt. Gilead, O. 

Wilson, Blanche South Lyon 

Wilson, Eva B Cheboygan 

Wilson, Gladys A Webberville 

Wilson, Goldie Silverwood 

Wilson, Hollace (Miss) Hesperia 

Wilson, Ruth McKinley Litchfield 

Wiltse, Norris G Tekonsha 

Wiltshire, Charlotte Onaway 

Wines, Kathleen Howell 

Winkler, Elizabeth Manistee 

Winn, EthelE '. Kings Mills 

Winters, Dorothy A • •••.-. Vanderbilt 

Wisner, Helen B Flushing 

Withey, Jean D . . . Ravenna 

Witmer, Ida V Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Witt, Mrs. Leona Perry 

Witting, Amanda Helen Ann Arbor 

Woelmer, Edna M . Petersburg 

Wolf, Jessie Montgomery 

Wolfe, Anna M Keokuk, Iowa 

Wolfe, Eldon .' Ortonville 

Wolfe, Ralph A ( Sherwood 

Wolfstyn, R. Geraldine Port Huron 

Wolkerson, Edna D Muskegon 

Wood, Asa H Mayville 

Wood, Emilie '. National Mine 

Wood, Flora L Maltby 

Wood, Geo. N Standish 

Wood, Mrs. Geo Standish 

Wood, Helena F Rapid City 

Wood, Nellie , National Mine 



292 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wood, E. Pearl Tecumseh 

Woodhead, Alice Manistee 

Woodward, Doris M Clinton 

Woodward, Jessie H Port Huron 

Woodworth, Ellen Ovid 

Woolverton, Eleanor Loraine Grand Rapids 

Wright, Grace Birmingham 

Wright, Lauretta Ashland Ky. 

Wright, Ramona A Jonesville 

Wrigley, Mary A Fremont, 0. 

Wuschack, Edna E Dearborn 

Wyatt, Lucretia E Ft. Smith, Ark. 

Wyble, Verne H Vermontville 

Wylie, Anna Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Yager, Marie G Onaway j 

Yeagley, Elva Munson 

Youelle, Helen Swartz Creek 

Young, Mrs. J. Chas Ypsilant! 

Young, Elsie L Jackson 

Young, Esther Van Wert, 

Young, Ida Ann Arbor 

Youngs, Winifred Fowlerville 

Yuhse, Charlotte E Manistee 

Ziegler, Augusta K Saginaw, W. S. I 

Zimmer, Hazel M St. Clair. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



DECEMBER, 1919, MARCH, JUNE, AND AUGUST, 1920 

Abbott, HazelJ. graded August, 1920 Ludington 

Acheson, Eleanor J. life June, 1920 Clio* 

Agnew, Hugh E. M. Pd. June, 1920 New York 

Aldrich, Luetta M. life August, 1920 Royal Oak 

Aldrich, PerrieD E. graded AugUBt, 1920 Royal Oak 

Alexander, Roxie life June, 1920 Sistersville, W. Va.j 

Allan, Anna Viola life June, 1920 Laurium 

Allen, 1 lorenoe M. life August, 1920 Traverse City 



STUDENTS 293 

Allen, lone Sanford life August, 1920 Bellaire 

Amrin, Myrtle Gray life June, 1920 Lansing 

Anderson, Florence life June, 1920 Armada 

Armentrout, Genevra life August, 1920 Jackson 

Arnold, Gladys M. life August, 1920 Lansing 

Ashley, Beatrice M. life June, 1920 Lyons 

Ashley, Mildred M. graded June, 1920 Lyons 

Atchison, Florence Bell life June, 1920 Fremont 

Austin, Helen life June, 1920 Laingsburg 

Bacon, Carolyn P. life March, 1920 Mauricetown, N. J. 

Bartley, Marion E. life March, 1920 Alma 

Bacon, Louise A. life June, 1920 Auburn 

Baker, Grover C. A. B. August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Baker, Irene H. graded August, 1920 Clayton 

Barber, Ethyl life June, 1920 Cheboygan 

Bard, Marion Alice life June, 1920 Benton Harbor 

Barnum, Frances life June 1920 Toledo, Ohio 

Barton, R. Clark life August, 1920 Romulus 

Bauer, Clara life June, 1920 Wyandotte 

Beachum, Edna I. life August, 1920 Shelby 

Beaton, Isabel Kay life June, 1920 Detroit 

Beattie, Nina Mae life August, 1920 Bay City 

Beaubier, Bessie Asenath life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Bechtol, Louise life December, 1919 Van Wert, Ohio 

Bell, Marguerite A. life June, 1920 Traverse City 

Bemis, Grace Margaret life June, 1920 . . . Detroit 

Bennett, Arlo A. life December, 1919 Webberville 

Benson, Annetta M. graded August, 1920 Caspian 

Benson, Kathryn Eunice - life June, 1920 Waterloo, Ind. 

Bernard, Harriet life June, 1920 Richmond 

Bigge, Pearl C. life June, 1920 Copemish 

Binns, Ray W. life March, 1920 Holloway 

Bird, Audrey Lylle life June, 1920 Holly 

Bird, M. Gladys life December, 1919 Romulus 

Black, Hazel O. life June, 1920 Caro 

Blackney, Lauretta Elizabeth life June, 1920 Calumet 

Blendall, Jessie C. life June, 1920 Kearsarge 

Bliss, Helen Margaret life June, 1920 Milan 

Bode, Erne H. life June, 1920 Fremont 



294 NORMAL COLLEGE~YEAR BOOK 

Boone, Rose M. graded August, 1920 Zeeland 

Boughton, Thelma G. life June, 1920 Flint 

Bradshaw, Esther L. life June, 1920 Royal Oak 

Braidwood, Mary B. graded August, 1920 Romeo 

Brandt, Edna M. life June, 1920 Zeeland 

Breining, Genevieve conservatory June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Bridger, Gladys life August, 1920 Perry 

Brigham, Alice Ethel life August, 1920 Millington 

Brines, Ada Eileen life June, 1920 Detroit 

Brink, Belle J. life June, 1920 Grant 

Broka, Esther life August, 1920 Perrysburg, Ohio 

Broka, Lillian M. A. B. August, 1920 Sturgis 

Brooks, Florene M. life June, 1920 Brown City 

Brooks, Gladys M. life December, 1919 Flushing 

Brooks, Minnie life August, 1920 Birmingham 

Brotherton, Wynnetto life June, 1920 Mason 

Brown, Edith M. life June, 1920 Saginaw 

Brown, Florence Augusta. life June, 1920 Stockbridge 

Brown, Florence A. life June, 1920 Hubbell 

Brown, Zadie E. life June, 1920 Eagle 

Buchanan, E. Pearson life August, 1920 Sault Ste. Marie 

Buckrell, Marion J. life March, 1920 Stanton 

Bull, Mildred Augusta life March, 1920. . . . Sistersville, W. Va. 

Burg, Alfield Bergetta graded August, 1920 Scottville 

Burnett, Dorothy Alice life June, 1920 Otsego 

Burton, William G. A. B. August, 1920 Bay City 

Burwell, Georgia E. rural June, 1920. Lansing 

Butcher, Dora M. life June, 1920 Hanover 

Butler, Doris A. life June, 1920 Millbrook 

Buttolph, Dorothea J. life June, 1920 Ionia 

Cady, Donna graded August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Cairns, Gladys Marie life; June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Caldwell, Frances Ethelyn life June, 1920 Constantine 

Cameron, Catherine life June, 1920 Wyandotte 

Campbell, Mabel A. graded August, 1920 Gaylord 

Campbell, Pheme A. graded June, 1920 Gaylord 

Cannon, Clarence \V. life August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Cannon, Loretta A. Life December, 1919 Ionia 

Carnahan, Ethel G. life; June, 1920 Adrian 



STUDENTS 295 



Carpenter, Marguerite B. life December, 1919 Onaway 

Carr, Allen B. life June, 1920 , . Ypsilanti 

Carroll, Hilda M. life June, 1920 Grand Ledge 

( lhapin, Hazel N. life June, 1920 Frankfort 

Chipman, Mary Adeline conservatory June, 1920 Gregory 

( Jhristenson, Robert S. life June, 1920 Weston 

Clark, Alberta M. life August, 1920 Morenci 

Clark, Edwin Lorenzo life March, 1920, Adrian 

Clarke, Mary Phyllis life June, 1920 St. Joseph 

Clute, Flora Louise life June, 1920 Marshall 

Cobb, Laura M. life March, 1920 Pontiac 

Coburn, Annie life December, 1919 Hesperia 

Cole, Florence life June, 1920 Charlotte 

Colister, Edith conservatory June, 1920 Perry 

Comins, Cleo Margery life June, 1920 Freesoil 

Comins, Ruth Esther life June, 1920 Freesoil 

Congdon, Winifred B. life June, 1920 Allegan 

Consoer, Alice C. life June, 1920 Three Oaks 

Coover, Hazel E. life June, 1920 Harbor Springs 

Corey, Ruth E. life June, 1920 South Haven 

Crawford, Wanda Isabel graded August, 1920 Sunfield 

Crittenden, Eugene D. A. B. December, 1919 Saline 

Croninger, Rhoda Mae life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Cudney, Helen E. life June, 1920 Owosso 

Culkins, Doris Irene life August, 1920 Albion 

Dacey, Ella Mae life June, 1920 .Sault Ste. Marie 

Daeubler, Anita M. A. life August, 1920 Monroe 

Daeubler, Hulda Caroline life June, 1920 Monroe 

D'Anjou, Eva M. life June, 1920 Boyne City 

Darling, Helen M. life June, 1920. Negaunee 

Davis, Beatrice Jane lif e June, 1920 Big Rapids 

Davis, Ruth Marie life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Davis, Sadie J. life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Dean, Erral Marjorie life June, 1920 Freesoil 

Decker, Leona life June, 1920 Laingsburg 

Delaforce, Edna E. life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Dennison, Mamie G. life June, 1920 Highland Park 

DeVinny, Mona Bell graded August, 1920 Linden 

Dickinson, Nellie M. life March, 1920 Marion 



296 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Dietz, Mildred life June, 1920 Caro 

Dill, Myrtle M. life June, 1920 Traverse City 

Dixon, Ruby L. graded August, 1920 Salem 

Dodge, Cynthia conservatory June, 1920 Lansing 

Dolph, Orpha M. life June, 1920 .Ypsilanti 

Donough, Helen J. life August, 1920 Cassopolis 

Doty, Blanche life December, 1919 DeWitt 

Downey, Cecile B. life June, 1920 Laurium 

Driscoll, Lila Evelyn life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Dunning, Bonnie L. life August, 1920 Midland 

Dunsmore, Beatrice life June, 1920 Bellaire 

Duursema, Ella J. life June, 1920 Fremont 

DuVall, Leo Eugene A. B. August, 1920 McBain 

Ecker, Vera Mae life June, 1920 Hudson 

Eckert, Margaret Crissmon life June, 1920 Detroit 

Elliott, Marion L. life June, 1920 Holly 

Ellis, Margaret May life June, 1920 Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Emens, John R. life June, 1920 Prattville 

Enders, Rowena Victoria graded June, 1920 . . Fenton 

Eppens, F. Hazel life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Ericksen, Olga B. graded June, 1920 Frankfort ■ 

Erickson, Gladys Marion life June, 1920 Ludington 

Ernst, Millie M. life June, 1920 Sparta 

Faulkner, Mary B. S. June, 1920 Milwaukee, Wis. 

Feeley, Esther M. graded August, 1920 Linden 

Ferrick, Helen V. life June, 1920 Clinton 

Fish, Eleanor Lee graded June, 1920 Algonac 

I' 'ishburne, Frances life June, 1920 St. Johns 

Flagg, Theresa M. graded August, 1920 East Jordan 

Foley, Lucy life June, 1920 Emmett 

Foreman, Katherine graded December, 1919 Laurium 

Forsythe, Charles E. life June, 1920 Milan 

Foster, Hildreth Jane life August, 1920 Pigeon 

Frasher, Elizabeth life June, 1920 Big Rapids 

Fredenburg, Mae life March, 1920 Pompeii 

French, Hazel Maria life June, 1920 Jackson 

Fritz, Miriam C. life August, 1920 Cass City 

Fuller, J. Burns. A. B. August, 1920 Fenton 

ley, Myrtle; life June, 1920 Lennon 



STUDENTS 297 

Garbe, Martha C. life June, 1920. Traverse City 

Garber, Lucile O. life June, 1920 Essexville 

Getchell, Mary Elizabeth life June, 1920 Mt. Pleasant 

Gifford, Helen B. A. B. August, 1920 Detroit 

Gilbert, Bernice Gast life June, 1920 Algonac 

Gimblett, Mary life June, 1920 Lapeer 

Glassford, Hilda M. life December, 1919 Charlevoix 

Gleave, Amy Proctor life June, 1920 Bay City 

Goodall, Marion L. life June, 1920 McGregor 

Goodwin, Margaret Sophy life March, 1920 Port Huron 

Goppelt, Florence E. graded August, 1920 Chesaning 

Goppelt, Marie C. life June, 1920 Chesaning 

Graham, Marie life June, 1920 Newark, Ohio 

Grand jean, Anna H. life August, 1920 Reese 

Grant, Bernice life December, 1919 Lexington 

Grant, Dorothy H. life June, 1920 Traverse City 

Grassley, Marguerite M. graded August, 1920 Deerfield 

Graves, Helene L. life June, 1920 Marine City 

Griffith, M. Louise life December, 1919. . Gcrrardstown, W. Va. 

Hackman, Edith K. life June, 1920 Kingsley 

Hall, T. Glenadine life June, 1920 Stockbridge 

Halverson, Grace M. life December, 1919 Lyons 

Harsch, Esther B. life June, 1920.. Traverse City 

Hart, Mildred M. life June, 1920 Clarksvilfe 

Haven, Flora E. life August, 1920 Clio 

Heath, Loraine life June, 1920 New Baltimore 

Hedrick, Ethel D. life June, 1920. . . ■ Nashville 

Helmick, Sarah life June, 1920 Unionville 

Henderson, Mabel Elizabeth life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Herbert, Elaine Marie life March, 1920 Saginaw 

Hernandez Curbelo, Antonia life March, 1920 . . Camur, Porto Rico 

Hiar, Erma Tressa life June, 1920 Levering 

Hickey, Hazel life August, 1920 Fair grove 

Hilborn, Clara Major life August, 1920 Flint 

Hill, Marguerite life June, 1920 New Baltimore 

Hilliar, Opal G. life June, 1920 Flint 

Hills, Elma A. B. August, 1920 Sandusky, Ohio 

Hilton, Doris M. life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Hirt, Helen B. life June, 1920 Highland Park 



298 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hitchcock, Helen life August, 1920 Lansing 

.Hoch, Nancy Evelyn life June, 1920 Sistersville, W. Va. 

Hocking, Irene Helen life June, 1920 Calumet 

Hoffman, Cornelia Wilhelmina life June, 1920 Detroit 

Hogan, Catherine life June, 1920 Bay City 

Holden, Anna Dorothy life June, 1920 Trenton 

Holmquist, L. Alein life June, 1920 Jennings 

Hook, Rosalind L. life June, 1920 Owosso 

Hoover, Flora G. A. B. August, 1920 Croton, Ohio 

Horgan, Cathryn H. life December, 1919 Saginaw 

Horton, Alta M. life August, 1920 Marine City 

Horton, Bertha Belle life August, 1920 Montrose 

Horton, Martha Isabel life August, 1920 Northville 

Hosner, Marion life June, 1920 Romeo 

Howarth, Helen Lucille life June, 1920 Lake Orion 

Howe, Gertrude M. Pd. August, 1920 Lansing 

Howlett, Florence N. graded August, 1920, Chelsea 

Hubbard, Susan M. life August, 1920 Port Huron 

Hudson, Ula M. life August, 1920 Webberville 

Huffman, Ina E. life June, 1920 Ubly 

Hunt, Mabel life August, 1920 Baroda 

Hunter, Louise F. life June, 1920 Vermontville 

Hutchinson, Howard B. B. S. August, 1920 Lake Linden 

Jacobson, Estelle life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Jacobson, Sophia H. life June, 1920 Frankfort 

James, Hattie E. life June, 1920 Laurium 

Jehnzen, Alma A. life June, 1920 Rodney 

Jens, Otto F. A. B. December, 1919 Detroit 

Jessup, Dorothy Helen life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Jewell, Ruth graded August, 1920 Fremont 

Johnson, Carrie Geneva life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Johnson, Martha J. life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Jones, Josina A. life June, 1920 Harbor Springs 

Jones, Violet M. life; .June 1920 DcTour 

Jones, Zelma L. life June, 1920 Waldron 

Jorae, Edith K. life August, 1920 Ovid 

Kalmbach, Dorothy E. conservatory June, 1920. .. .South Lyon 

5, \nii:. B. life .lime, 1920 Reed City 

i mma V. Wheaton. A. B. August, 1920 Pontiac 



STUDENTS 299 



Keep, Kathryne Lois life August, 1920 Coldwater 

Kennedy, Nella life December, 1919 Sterling 

Kimpton, Laura E. life December, 1919 Grand Haven 

King, Alice D. life June, 1920 Adrian 

Klaus, Lillian life June, 1920 Owosso 

Korn, Catherine C. life August, 1920 Ludington 

Kregel, Minnie life August, 1920 Muskegon 

Krcmpel, Wilma E. life June, 1920 Manistee 

LaBarge, Mrs. O. J. life August, 1920 Ann Arbor 

LaBelle, Bess M. life March, 1920 Scottville 

Laing, Harold R. life and A. B. June, 1920 Detroit 

Lamport, Jessie Swinton life March, 1920 Detroit 

Lankton, Hazel S. life August, 1920 DeWitt 

LaNoble, Marguerite A. life June, 1920 Bath 

Lathrop, Helen E. life December, 1919 Berville 

Laughlin, Liva life August, 1920 Horton 

Lee, Frank H. life June, 1920 .Pontiac 

Leete, A. Marion life August, 1920 Highland Park 

Lehman, Frieda life June, 1920 Port Huron 

Lenheiser, J. Reuben life August, 1920 Evart 

Lever ett, Lucile Eunice life August, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Lewis, Bertha Barbara life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Lipsey, Elsie E. life August, 1920 Charlotte 

Lock, Grace life June, 1920 Williamston 

Lockwood, Iva B. life August, 1920 Caro 

Long, Dulah O. graded August, 1920^ Davison 

Loomis, Elizabeth Enid life August, 1920.. Onsted 

Loomis, Katherine M. life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Lourim, Mollie E. graded August, 1920 Bay City 

Luse, Foster D. life December, 1919 Riga 

Luxton, Orena E. life June, 1920 Bay City 

Lynch, Mildred E. life June, 1920 Lima, Ohio 

Lytle, Irene B. graded June, 1920 Gladwin 

Lytle, Marian J. life June, 1920 Gladwin 

Maddaugh, Nellc S. graded August, 1920 Boyne City 

Maltas, Ethel Mae life August, 1920 Sault Ste. Marie 

Marks, Bernice Marie life June, 1920 Hudson 

Martin, Lulu A. B. August, 1920 Grand Ledge 

Martin, Orletta D. life June, 1920 Traverse City 



300 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Martindale, Ula life June, 1920 Harbor Springs 

Mather, Hattie Amelia life August, 1920 Bay City 

May, Helen Isabel graded August, 1920 Horton 

McCall, Eleanor life August, 1920 Pontiac 

McCalla, Helen Georgian life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

McClatchie, Myrtle Grace A. B. August, 1920 Ludington 

McClaughry, Isca Pauline A. B. August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

McClear, Muriel Alicia life March, 1920 Whitmore Lake 

McClellan, Clara E. life August, 1920 Holland 

McCloskey, Esther life March, 1920 Chelsea 

McCioskey, K. Leora life June 1920 Pinckney 

McConnell, H. Marian life December, 1919 Grass Lake 

MacConnell, Jane graded August, 1920 Tecumseh 

McConnell, Magdalene M. life June, 1920 Detroit 

McCormick, Catherine J. graded August, 1920 Birch Run 

McCormick, Mary A. life March, 1920 Birch Run 

McCrory, Beryl life June, 1920 South Lyon 

MacFarlane, Esther E. life June, 1920 "...Cadillac 

McGregor, Claudia A. life June, 1920 Montgomery 

McGregor, Edna D. life June, 1920 Montgomery 

MacKay, Sina Agatha life June, 1920 Norway 

McKenney, Margaret life August, 1920 Yale 

MacKenzie, Jean H. life June, 1920 Lake Linden 

MaLaren, Mae A. B. June, 1920 Rose City 

MacLean, Hannah I. life June, 1920 Bay City 

McLean, Marion life June, 1920 Calumet 

McMillan, Geraldine life June, 1920 Muskegon 

McRae, Flora M. life March, 1920 Harbor Bead 

Mears, Hazel Marie life June, 1920 Stockbridgc 

Meehan, Catherine Darrah life August, 1920 Port Huron 

Meier, Gladys G. conservatory June, 1920 Grand Ledge 

Menger, Hilda A. life June, 1920 Holt 

Mersman, Fanny life August, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Metcalf, Lorna Doonc life August, 1920 Leslie 

MHz, Evelyn Julia life June, 1920 Saginaw, 10. 8. 

Metzler, Sarah life December, 1919 Ludington 

Meyer, Lucile K. life .June, 1920 Lake Linden 

Milks, Daisy Ethel life June, 1920 Norway • 

Miller, Bertha life .June, 1920 Grand Rapid* ? 



STUDENTS 301 

Miller, Eva Mae life March, 1920 Bay City 

Miller, Helen Rose life August, 1920 Chelsea 

Miller, Jessie Isabelle life December, 1919 Flint 

Miller, Shirley R. life June, 1920 Marine City 

Minnie, Thelma Jessie life June, 1920 Yale 

Molloy, Theresa M. life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Monks, M. Lela life August, 1920 Pinckney 

Montgomery, Helen Drake life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Moore, Arthur E. life June, 1920 Royal Oak 

Moore, Bernice Day life June, 1920 Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moore, Maude M. life August, 1920 North Branch 

Moore, Mildred E. life June, 1920 Bay City 

Moran, Ethel life August, 1920 Jackson 

Morey, L. Eloise life June, 1920 Clayton 

Morgan, Pearl Garrison life June, 1920 Blissfield 

Morris, Allen Elmer B. S. June, 1920 Saline 

Mosier. Mabel C. life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Mot t, Mary Annette life December, 1919 B. S. June 1920. .Adrian 

Mox, Clara C. graded August, 1920 Kingsley 

Myer, Florence life June, 1920 Newark, Ohio 

Xeal, L. May life June, 1920 . .Bay City 

Nelson, Josephine life June, 1920 Elberta 

Nelson, Pernella C. life June, 1920 Onekama 

Nichols, Grace E. life June, 1920 Stockbridge 

Nicholson, Jr., Hiram A. life June, 1920 Ionia 

Xickelson, Pearl life June, 1920 Minneapolis, Minn. 

Xikula, Tyyne J. life June, 1920 Wakefield 

Xold, Grace A. life August, 1920 Flint 

Xorberry, Ruth Muriel life June, 1920 Hancock 

Xorthrup, Eunice M. conservatory June, 1920 Lawrence 

Xulan, Mary Genevieve life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Moll, Olive life August, 1920 Clinton 

Hson, Irene conservatory December, 1919 Manistique 

)ltman, Hildred Harriet life August, 1920 Grand Rapids 

)pal, Edith Muriel life June, 1920 Laurium 

VRourke, Doris life June, 1920 Richmond 

)sborn, Joy M. A. B. December, 1919 Maple Rapids 

)usterhout, Travers E. life August, 1920 Tawas City 

W, Gertrude lif e June, 1920 Mancelona 



302 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Palmer, Louisa F. A. B. August, 1920 Brooklyn 

Palmer, Olive E. graded August, 1920 Blissfield 

Parkinson, Gladys life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Parks, Ruth M. graded August, 1920 Birmingham 

Parr, Kathleen Marguerite life June, 1920 Dearborn 

Parson, Howard E. life August, 1920 Smiths Creek 

Paull, Crescence U. life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Peacock, Idelphia A. life June, 1920 Portland 

Perry, Esther M. life March* 1920 Lowell 

Petertyl, Esther G. life June, 1920 .Traverse City 

Pettit, Irvena Elizabeth life June, 1920 Dundee 

Phillipp, C. Gertrude graded August, 1920 Bellaire 

Piper, Lou Arthur conservatory August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Placeway, Carolyn E. graded June, 1920 St. Louis 

Piatt, Raye Roberts life June, 1920 Marine City 

Plumb, Margaret life June, 1920 St. Joseph 

Porter, Gladys life June, 1920 Owosso 

Potter, Susan M. life December, 1919 Port Huron 

Powelson, Mildred H. life June,' 1920 Holly 

Powers, Sidney J. A. B. March, 1920 Harbor Springs 

Powrie, M. Alice life August, 1920 St. Clair 

Prescott, Florence L. graded August, 1920 Eaton Rapids 

Price, Mrs. Maude Electa Jones life December, 1919. .Ann Arbor 

Purcell, Nona M. graded August, 1920 Birch Run 

Quackenbush, Edward J. A. B. August, 1920. . . .Highland Park 

Ramshaw, Violet B. life December, 1919 Paulding, Ohio 

Randall, Faith Eileen life December, 1919 Port Huron 

Randall, Mary Loraine life June, 1920 Hastings 

Read, Mina L. life December, 1919 Hillsdale 

Reaper, Ruth Sabina life June, 1920 Monroe 

R< ed, Charlotte Ann life December, 1919 Monroe 

Reid, Clarence James J>. S. August, 1920 Wayne 

Reid, Etta Mae life June, 1920 Avoca 

ord, Florence graded August, 1920 Manitou Beach 

Reynolds, John T. life June, 1920 Bcrville 

Rice, Lilliai life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Rice, M Lucille life June, 1920 Howell 

Rich, Clinton EL life August, 1920 Deerfield 

Richardson, Mabel life August, 1920 Lansing 



STUDENTS 303 

Richardson, Philomene life June, 1920 Detroit 

Riley, Winona A. B. S. December, 1919 Weston 

Roberts, Florence Alice life June, 1920 Allegan 

Roberts, Mary graded August, 1920 Mt. Clemens 

Robinson, Pearl MacKellar life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Rollin, Russell Alger life August, 1920 Alabaster 

Root, Charles C. M. Pd. June, 1920 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Roscoe, Alice A. B. June, 1920 Nashville 

Rose, Hazel M. life June, 1920 Detroit 

Roth, Helen I. life June, 1920 , GlenwOod 

Rouse, Faye M. life August, 1920 Harbor Springs 

Ruona, Marie I. life March, 1920 Ishpeming 

Saettel, Mary Elizabeth life June, 1920 Hudson 

Sailer, Edith Magdalene life June, 1920 Albion 

Saleska, Marie A. life June, 1920 Lansing 

Sanberg, Jennie Lucille life June, 1920 Ironwood 

Sauer, Laura Marie life June, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Schmaus, Mabel M. life June, 1920 Coloma 

Schmid, Clara Louise life December, 1919 Ypsilanti 

Schwader, Vada graded August, 1920 Freeport 

Schrier, Sena V. life June, 1920 Muskegon 

Scothorne, Daisy M. life June, 1920 Nashville 

Scovill, Mary S. life June, 1920 Hudson 

Scranton, Winona C. life March, 1920 Durand 

See, Gladys E. graded June, 1920 Durand 

. Seely, Fern E. life June, 1920 Cass City 

Shanks, Frances B. S. June, 1920 Detroit 

Sharphorn, Dorothy Marie life June, 1920. .. .Grand Rapids 

Sheets, Dorothy L. life June, 1920 Fremont, Ind. 

Shellenberger, Cleo W. A. B. December, 1919 Sturgis 

Shier, Ula Mae life June, 1920 Wolverine 

Sibilsky, Coral Lorene life June, 1920 Laurium 

' Sibray, Thella M. life June, 1920 Cadillac 

Sill, Martha M. life June, 1920 Traverse City 

Simmons, Grace Schell life and A. B. August, 1920. North Branch 

Singleton, Paul J. life June, 1920 Big Rapids 

Skelley, Alice life August, 1920 Vassar 

Skelley, E. Nina life August, 1920 Vassar 

Slawson, Vivian Holbrook life June, 1920 Mancelona 



304 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Smalley, Rosalind M. life August, 1920. Muskegon 

Smiley, Thera Blanche life June, 1920 Bangor 

Smith, Carol L. life June, 1920 Morenei 

Smith, Edith L. life December, 1919 Saginaw 

Smith, Fannie B. life March, 1920 Pentwater 

Smith, Floyd L. life August, 1920 Cedar Springs 

Smith, Frances I. life March, 1920 Mason 

Smith, Irene H. life June, 1920 Pontiac 

Smith, Jessie D. life June, 1920 Sault Ste. Marie 

Smith, Julia Carolyn life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Smith, Mildred A. life August, 1920 Belleville 

Snyder, Edna Lavonia life June, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Snyder, Leona D. life June, 1920 Coldwater 

Sontag, Lillian Eva life August, 1920 Cheboygan 

Spalding, Ruth M. life June, 1920 Perry 

Spears, Emma M. life August, 1920 Pontiac 

Spears, Maude E. life March, 1920 Pontiac 

Speer, Robert K. S. life March, 1920 Minden City 

Spiegelberg, H. Ruth life August, 1920 Chelsea 

Staley, Vivian Pauline graded August, 1920 . Sistersville, W. Va. 

Stanard, Hazel Erma life August, 1920 Detroit 

Stanton, Carol graded June, 1920 Ovid 

Stanton, Christine graded June, 1920 Ovid 

Stark, Ida G. life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Starkweather, Ruth I. graded August, 1920 Birch Run 

Stearns, Elizabeth life June, 1920 Saginaw 

Steed, Bernice Ethel life June, 1920 Grand Rapids 

Steele, Victoria A. life August, 1920 Negaunee 

Stellwagen, Helen I. life June, 1920 Wayne 

Stevens, Helen life August, 1920 Mancelona 

Stevens, Joseph II . life December, 1919 Detroit 

Stewart, Ethel G. life xMarch, 1920 North Branch 

Stewart, Ruth E. life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Stock, Lelia Wilhelmina life .June, 1920 Detroit 

Stolzenfeld, Mrs. M. life; and A. B. June, 1920. .Highland Park 

Stowell, Cert rude A. life June, 1920 Hastings 

Streng, Alvena M. life August, 1920 Plymouth 

Sturm, Esther K. life June, 1920 Saline 

Suobanki, Flon nee S. life June, 1920 Detroit 



STUDENTS 305 



Swearingen, Anne life June, 1920 New Philadelphia, Ohio 

Sweet, Marjorie life June, 1920 .Ypsilanti 

Tallman, Beulah M. life June, 1920 Greenville 

Tate, Alfred Ray B. S. August, 1920 Grandville 

Taylor, Margaret A. life March 1920 Leslie 

Tefft, Edith Mary A. B. August, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Thomas, Ruth M. life June, 1920 Laurium 

Thomspon, Adelaide graded June, 1920 Owosso 

Tiffin, Ermah life August, 1920 Plymouth 

Topping, Florence B. life December, 1919 Gregory 

Turner, Lillian A. life August, 1920 Saginaw 

Turner, Mary E. life March, 1920 Oscoda 

Uksila, Olive life June, 1920 Calumet 

Underhill, Hazel V. life March, 1920 Salem 

Van Antwerp, Lowell B. graded August, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Van De Walker, Cora Klackle life August, 1920. . Stevensville 

Van Enam, Marie A. graded August, 1920 Zeeland 

Van Horn, Irene life June, 1920 Grand Ledge 

Vedder, Almon V. life June, 1920. Willis 

Virgin, Helen E. life December, 1919 Clarkston 

von Sprecken, Ella life June, 1920 Ludington 

Vrooman, Mae L. life June, 1920 Muskegon 

Wade, Marguerite Ellen life June, 1920 Calumet 

Waggoner, Olive life June, 1920 Bad Axe 

Waldorf, Minerva life August, 1920 Toronto, Ont. 

Walker, Reva Helen life June, 1920 Brockway, Mont. 

Wallace, Grace Leana life June, 1920 Bay City 

Walper, Clara L. life December, 1919 Benton Harbor 

Ward, Evelyn Lenore life June, 1920 Owosso 

Warren, Erma M. life June, 1920 ...Hillsdale 

Weaver, Marjorie F. life August, 1920 Charlevoix 

Webb, Earl Clinton life June, 1920 Memphis 

Webb, Warren H. A. B. June, 1920 Williamston 

Wedow, Clara Marie life December, 1919 Bay City 

Wcitbrecht, Emma C. life August, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Welch, Dora LuBelle life June, 1920 Mason 

Wertenberger, Grace E. life August, 1920 Monroe 

Wesala, Ina Gladys life August, 1920 Ironwood 

Westcott, Josephine Ethel graded June, 1920 Owosso 

39 



306 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wheeler, Donald Sydney life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Whelan, Josephine life March, 1920 Big Rapids 

White, Mame E. life December, 1919 Highland 

Whitlock, Majel Lucile life June, 1920 Brighton 

Whitmer, Gladys A. life June, 1920 Colon 

Wickstrom, Milma life August, 1920 Detroit 

Wieland, Grace Marie life June, 1920 Lansing 

Wilber, Dana Marjorie life June, 1920 Lansing 

Williams, Fannie C. A. B. June, 1920 New Orleans, La. 

Williams, R. Marguerite life August, 1920 Caro 

Williams, Sarah Eleanor life March, 1920 Saginaw 

Wilson, Doris life June, 1920 Jackson 

Wilson, Dorothy Evelyn life June, 1920 Manton 

Wilson, Harriet E. life June, 1920 Capac 

Withey, Jean D. life June, 1920 Ravenna 

Witmar, Edna graded June, 1920 ' Lyons 

Witting, Amanda Helen life August, 1920 Ann Arbor 

Wolfeil, Lillian life June, 1920 Otia 

Wood, Asa H. A. B. August,1920 Blanchard 

Wood, George Noble A. B. August, 1920 Standish 

W 7 oodbury, Frances Cork life June, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Woodward, Doris M. life August, 1920 Clinton 

Woodward, Jessie H. life August, 1920 .*. Port Huron 

Woodworth, Ellen Margaret graded August, 192 . .Ovid 

Woolverton, Eleanor Loraine life August, 1920. .Grand Rapids 

Wright, Mildred Constance life August, 1920 Coldwater 

WyckofT, Margaret Soule life March, 1920 Ypsilanti 

Yageman, Linda B. life June, 1920 Pinnebog 

Zehner, Alex 1). life June, 1920 Stevensville 



STATISTICS FOR 1920-1921 307 



STATISTICS FOR 1920-1921 



Enrollment July 1, 1920 to Feb. 23, 1921 

Summer Term, 1920 .1705 

Regular Year to February 23, 1921 1345 

3050 
Deduct — counted twice 120 

2930 

Extension — correspondence 472 

3402 

Enrollment in Training School: 

Kindergarten — Normal 40 

Woodruff 41 

Prospect 28 

First Grade 37 

Second Grade 45 

Third Grade 47 

Fourth Grade 26 

Fifth Grade 45 

Sixth Grade 34 

Seventh Grade 44 

Eighth Grade 50 

Open Air Room 18 

Special Room 15 

Woodruff: 

First Grade 58 

Second Grade 34 

Third Grade 36 

Fourth Grade 42 



308 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



High School: 



Ninth Grade • 34 

Tenth Grade 48 

Eleventh Grade 36 

Twelfth Grade 37 801 



4203 



States Represented 



Arkansas 2 Montana 1 

Florida 1 New York 13 

Georgia 1 Ohio 125 

Illinois 14 Oklahoma 4 

Indiana 21 Pennsylvania 4 

Kentucky 11 South Dakota 1 

Louisiana 1 Tennessee, 2 

Minnesota 1 West Virginia 12 

Missouri 7 



Diplomas and Certificates granted during 1919-20 



M.Pd. A.B. B.S. B.Pd. Life Cons. Graded Rural TV 

August 9 5 25 111 1 25 4 180 

December.... 4 1 35 1 1 42 

March 1 33 34 

June 2 6 3 277 7 13 1 309 

Total.... 2 20 9 25 456 9 39 5 565 

( taunted twice 9 

556 






DIRECTORY FOR 1920-1921 209 



DIRECTORY FOR 1920-1921 



Charles McKenny, LL.D., 730 Forest Avenue 

Adams, Edith, M.Pd .508 Emmet St. 75-J 

Alexander, Frederick, A.B 35 S. Summit St. 601-J 

Allison, Clara Janet, A.B 510 Brower St. 322-R 

Alpermann, Johanna M., A.M 209 Emmet St. 200-M 

Andrews, Elsie V., A.B 825 Michigan Ave. 503-W 

Bacon, Mabel P., A.B 952 Ellis St. 1177-J 

Barbour, Florus A., A.M 408 Forest Ave. 345 

Beal, Vinora, A.M 208 Emmet St. 294-R 

Blount, Alma, Ph.D 952 Ellis St. 1177-M 

Boardman, Alice 1 938 W. Forest Ave. 1065-W 

Boughner, Ruth 607 Forest Ave. 1025-M 

Bowen, Wilbur P., M.S., B.Pd 1020 Ellis St. 766-R 

Buell, Bertha G., A.M 1010 Ellis St. 216-R 

Burton, Fannie Cheever, M.Pd 517 N. Adams St. 170 

Carey, Elisabeth, A.M : 209 Normal St. 

Chamberlin, Veil, B.S 510 Brower St. 522-R 

Clark, Irene O., B.Pd 526 Chicago Ave. 1038-M 

Clark, Lida 420 Ballard St. 486-M 

Cook, Helen 307 N. Adams St. 497 

Corbin, Byron, A.B 510 Brewer St. 522-R 

Crandall, Jesse W ....712 Ellis St. 1501-J 

Curtis, Lera B 603 Cross St. 

Densmore, Lucia M 519 Congress St. 779-W 

Dodge, Agnes, B.Pd 607 Forest Ave. 1025-M 

D'Ooge, Benjamin L., A.M., Ph.D 420 Forest Ave. 763 

Downing, Estelle E., A. M 805 Michigan Ave. 503-W 

Elliott, Chas. M., A.M 250 Moss Ave., Highland Park 

Erwin, Neva Greene 105 Ellis St. 1128-W 

Faulkner, Mary, B.S 1007 Ellis St. 927-M 

Ferrin, Nellie, A.B 518 Forest Ave. 

Field, Anna Winifred, B.S 2 N. Normal St. 939-J 

Ford, Richard Clyde, Ph.D 609 Pearl St. 483 

Foster, Clyde E 318 Ellis St. 

French, Martha H., A.B 712 Ellis St. 626-M 



310 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Garner, Lota H 316 Ellis St. ' 574-M 

Gee, Russell .325 Wallace Blvd. 938-W 

Goddard, Mary A., A.B 308 Ballard St. 321-W 

Goodison, Bertha 317 S. Huron St. 296-M 

Gorton, Frederick R., Ph.D 217 Normal St. 576-M 

Greenstreet, Frederick M., A.B 950 Sheridan Ave. 1031-M 

Harvey, Nathan A., Ph.D 1029 EUis St. 399-M 

Hatton, Mary E 905 Ellis St 794-M 

Haughton, Grace, A.B 825 Michigan Ave. 503-W 

HiU, H. M 615 Pearl 

Hintz, Ida G., A.B 510 Pearl St., 269-J 

Hover, J. Milton, A.B., B.S 936 W. Forest Ave. 846-R2 

Hoyt, Chas. O., Ph.D 417 Forest Ave. 405 

Irion, Theo. W. H., A.M 128 N. Washington St. 

Jackson, Adella R., M.Pd 16 N. Summit St. 419-J 

Jefferson, Mark, A.M 205 Normal St. 480 

Kelly, Florence, B.S 211 Woodard St. 439-J 

King, Charlotte L., B.Pd., B.S 611 Pearl St. 591-J 

Laird, Samuel B., A.M 319 Forest Ave. 519 

Lardie, Annette M 102 N. Hamilton St. 895-R 

Lathers, J. Stuart, A.M 414 Olive St. 1113-M 

Leary, Walter 35 S Summit St. 601-J 

Leas, Ruth 506 Cross St. 1198-W 

Letter, Gertrude 448 S. Huron St. 408-M 

Lott, Henry C, A.M., M.Pd .722 Lowell St. 393-M 

Lyman, Elmer A., A.B., LL.D 126 N. Washington St. 61 

Lyon, Florence, A.B 510 Pearl St. 269-J 

Matteson, Jane L., A.M 420 Emmet St. 484-M 

MrCriekett, Elizabeth 1 805 Pearl St. 644-M 

McCrickett, Ethel 805 Pearl St. 644-M 

McCulloch, John II., B.P.E 9 S. Normal St. 

McDermott, Mary, B.S., A.M 712 Ellis St. 

McKay, Frederick B., A.B 1116 Ellis St. 806-J 

MacKenzie, Earriet, A.M 110 Emmet St. 532-J 

McLouth, Florence, B.S 115 Catherine St. 554-M 

Meston, [va Eleanor, B.S 115 Catherine St. 554-M 

Morrison, Jennie Bell L23 N. Summit St. 659-R 

Morse, Agnes 318 Park SI, 778-W 

Niblicl , Eunice 119 Ellis St. 869-W 



DIRECTORY FOR 1920-1921 311 

Norris, Orland O., A.B 1002 Ellis St. 766-M 

Norton, Ada A., Ph. M 510 Pearl St. 269-J 

Paine, Olive, Ph.B 905 Ellis St. 794-M 

Pcarce, Abigail, A.M 410 Emmet St. 532-J 

Peet, Bert W., M.S 128 Normal St. 356-M 

Phelps, C. Gertrude, B.S 408 Emmet St. 294-R 

Phelps, Jessie, M.S 936 Forest Ave. 846-R 

Porter, Constance, A.B 611 Pearl St. 591-J 

Pray, Carl E., A.M 4 S. Summit St. 509-R 

Priddy, Bessie Leach, Ph.D 502 W. Forest Ave. 1024-M 

Putnam, Mary B., Ph.M., M.Pd 314 Forest Ave 73-W 

Putnam, Sarah 510 Pearl St. 269-J 

Rankin, Estabrook, A.M 606 Pearl St. 308-W 

Reading, Gertrude 308 Ballard St. 321-W 

Richardson, Jessie, A.B 130 N. Normal St. 905-M 

Rieder, Harold L 309 N. Huron St. 772-R 

Roberts, Dimon H., A.M 43 S. Summit St. 518 

Robinson, Mrs. Matilda 415 Perrin St. 1183 

Rynearson, Elton : 115 Ballard St. 453-J 

Sawyer, Christobel, Ph.B 510 Brower St. 322-R 

Selesky, Inez, A.B 231 Summit St. 900-R 

Sherzer, William H., M.S., Ph.D 9 Summit St. 803-J 

Simpson, Elizabeth F 432 N. Washington St. 1117-M 

Smith, Bertram G., Ph.D 122 College Place. 343-M 

Smith, EUa M., A.B 316 Michigan Ave. 141-M 

Smith, Harry L., B.S 209 Normai St. 387-J 

Snow, Glenadine, B.S ...952 Ellis St. 927-J 

Spofford, Ellatheda 905 Ellis St. 794-M 

Steimle, Clemens P., A.B 951 Sheridan Ave. 769-J 

Stevens, J. W 509 Ellis St. 237 

Stinson, Susan W., B.S 418 Emmet St. 654-M 

Strafer, Elinor M., B.S 209 Normal St. 

Supe, Carolina A., A.B 936 W. Forest Ave. 846-R 

Taylor, Ethel E 130 N. Normal St. 905-M 

Todd, Chloe, B.Pd 410 Forest Ave. 173 

Towne, Blanche, A.B 216 N. Hamilton St. 498-M 

Turnbull, Lyleth 230 N. Grove St. 

Walton, Genevieve M., A.M 404 N. Huron St. 

Watson, Marion 120 N. Adams St. 625-M 



312 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Welden, Louise, B.Pd 316 W. Michigan Ave. 141-M 

Wells, R. A., A.M 914 Sheridan Ave. 794-J 

Wilcox, Ora B 216 N. Hamilton St. 498-M 

Wilson, EUa M., A.B 408 Emmet St. 263-J 

Wise, Margaret E., M.Pd 18 N. Adams St. 760-J 

Wolfe, Anna M., B.S 606 Pearl St. 308-W 

Wombaugh, Mabel, A.B 128 Normal St. 356-M 

Wood, Frances Parkinson 323 W. Michigan Ave. 253 

Wright, Bessie 827 McKinley St., Ann Arbor 1868-M 



Ind 



ex 



Page 

Accepted Schools " 68 

Policy 68 

Conditions 68 

Administrative Organization 26 

Admission to Courses 70 

To Training Department 200 

Advanst Credits 67 

Committees on 26 

Alumni, The 43 

American Schoolmaster, The 54 

Announcements for 1920-1921 7 

Art Club 50 

Associations : — 

Alumni , 43 

Athletic. ! 41 

Choir, Normal 45 

Oratorical 44 

Students' Christian 51 

Athletic Association 45 



bachelor of Arts 72 

bachelor of Science 73 

biological Laboratory 38 

>oard and Rooms 64 

uildings Occupied by College 33 

ureau, Employment 51 

ureau, Teachers' 61 



314 INDEX. 

C Page 

Calendar for 1920-1921 3 

Catholic Students Club. 52 

Certificates, Life , 77 

Certificates, Limited 88 

Chemistry Club 49 

Chemistry, Department of 92 

Choir, Normal 45 

Christian Association, Students' v 51 

Clubs and Societies 43 

Commercial Curriculum 81 

Committee on Extra Studies 26 

Concert Course, Normal 55 

Conservatory, Students in 247 

Contemporary Club 49 

Contents, Table of 5 

Council, Students 61 

Correspondence and Extension Courses 90 

Credentials 68 

Credits, Advanst 67 

Curricula 70-90 

Four Years' College Curricula 72 

Bachelor of Arts 72 

Bachelor of Science 73 

Two Years' College Life Certificate 77 

High School and Departmental 77 

Grammar Grade 78 

Intermediate Grade 79 

Kindergarten — Primary 80 

Special: 

( Commercial 81 

Fine Arts 82 

I lomc Economics 73 

Industrial Arts 83 

M usic 83 

Physical Education 75 

Rural School 85 



INDEX. 315 

Page 

Rural Superintendents 86 

Special Education 87 

Limited Certificates: — 88 

Graded School Certificates 89 

Rural School Certificates 

Rural School 

Special Education 

Training Teachers 



D 

Debating 45 

Degree Curriculum 72 

Departmental Curriculum, High School and 77 

Department Libraries 42 

Department Teaching ' 200 

Departments and Courses 92 

Directions to Students^ 65 

Directory of Faculty, 1920-1921 . 309 

Discipline 60 

E 

Education, Department of 96 

Employment Bureau 51 

English, Department of ■:..." 102 

Enrollment: — 

Directions for 65 

In Degree Courses 72 

In Training Department 200 

Entrance : — 

Conditions of 70 

Equipment of College 33 

Expenses 63 

Estimated Expenses 65 

Euclidean Society 50 



316 INDEX. 

Page 

Expression, Department of 109 

Extension Lectures 55 

Extension and Correspondence Courses 90 

Extra Studies, Committee on 2G 

F 

Faculty of the State Normal College 90 

Faculty, Directory of 309 

Fees 63 

Fine Arts Curriculum 82 

Fine Arts, Department of 114 

French, Courses in 149 

G 

Garden Project Club 50 

Grades and Standard of Scholarship 62 

Graded School Curriculum 88 

Geography, Department of 117 

German 151 

Graduates, List of 292 

Grammar Grade Curriculum 78 

Grounds Belonging to College 32 

Gymnasium 34 

II 

Health Cottage 34 

Health of Students 58 

High Schools, Accepted 68 

High School and Depart mental ( Jurrieulum 77 

High School Subjects Required 206 

History Club 50 

History of ( College 32 

History, I >epart ment of 120 

lion if Economics ( !urriculum 73 

Home Economics, Department of 125 

Housing Regulations 59 



INDEX. 317 

I Page 

Industrial Arts Curriculum 83 

Industrial Arts, Department of 133 

Intermediate Curriculum 79 

K 

Kindergarten — Primary Curriculum 80 

Kindergarten — Primary Department 137 

a 

L 

Laboratories. 38 

Agricultural 38 

Astronomical 41 

Biological 38 

Chemical 40 

Fine Arts 41 

Geological 38 

Geographical 41 

Physical 39 

Physical Education 41 

Physiological 39 

Latin 138 

Lectures, Extension 55 

Lesson Plans 202 

Library 35 

Department Libraries 42 

Reading Room 35 

Limited Certificates 88 

Literary Societies 48 

Loan Fund 61 

Location of College 31 

M 

Mathematics, Department of 143 

Men's Union 51 

Modern Languages 147 

Music Curriculum 83 

Music, Department of 152 



318 INDEX. 

N 

Names of Students: — Page 

High School Department » 208 

College Students: 

First Year 212 

Second Year (Life Certificate) 226 

Third Year 240 

Fourth Year (A.B.) 241 

Special Students 242 

Conservatory Students 243 

Summer School Students 251 

Natural Science, Department of . 158 

Equipment for 33 

Library Teachers' 42 

Special Students in 177 

Natural Science Club 49 

Normal Choir 45 

Normal College Extension Lectures 55 

Normal College News i 55 

Normal Concert Course 56 

Normal Lecture Course 57 

O 

Observation in Training Department 202 

Oratorical Association 43 

P 

Pease Auditorium 33 

Penmanship 177 

Physical Education Curriculum 75 

Physics, Department of 187 

Equipment for 39 

deal Education, Department of 177 

( 'ourses for Women 179 

( burses \' ( >\' Men 181 

Purpose of College 31 

R 

ling Room 35 

\<< ligioua Activities ,; 51 



INDEX. 319 

Page 

Rooms and Board 64 

Rural School Certificates 85 

Rural School Curriculum 85 

Rural Education 193 

Rural Superintendents Curriculum 86 

S 

Science Hall 33 

Scholarships: 

French 148 

Stoic 53 

E. A. Strong 53 

Morrison Alumni 53 

Contemporary Club . . . 54 

Scholarship and Grades 62 

Schools, Accepted 68 

! Social Regulations 60 

j Societies and Clubs 43 

I Sodalitas Latina , , 51 

! Spanish 150 

! Special Education 195 

: Special Education Curriculum 87 

Specializing Courses 77 

Standard of Scholarships and Grades 62 

Standing Committees 26 

Starkweather Hall 34 

State Board of Education, Members of 26 

Statistics, Table of 307 

Stoics 53 

Students' Christian Association 51 

Students' Council 61 

Student Teaching 201 

Student Welfare 58 

Students, Directions to 65 



Table of Contents 5 

Teachers' Bureau , , 61 



320 INDEX. 

Page 

Teaching in Departments 201 

Terms and Vacations 7 

Training Department 200 

Training Teachers 203 

Training Department Exercises 204 

Transfer of Credits with University 69-72 

W 

Women's Department of Physical Education 179 

Y 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A 51 



The Normal College Bulletin Issued Quarterly by the Mia 
t igan State Normal College and Entered as Second Claj 
Matter at the Postoffice at Ypsilanti, Michigan. 



The Bulletin Includes the Following :- 
Catalog Number. 
Summer Session. 
Conservatory of Music. 
V9nm»^Sepi\Ttment Announcements. 



Michigan State Normal 
College Bulletin 

Volume XI May, 1922 Number % 



CATALOG NUMBER 




1921-1922 



Published i^r thbXNormal College 
Y*sil\anti, Michigan 






SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOG 



OF THE 



Vliehigan State Normal College 

AND 

Conservatory of Music 

For 1921-1922 

INCLUDING 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1922-1923 

AND 

Register of Students 



TH£ i 



'H a o 

City QF 



IL LIHQIS 



YPSILANTI, MICH. 
1922 



1921 


1922 


1923 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


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S 
2 


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20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


29 


30 


31 








26 


27 


28 










27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27 


28 








SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 

2 


S 
3 


S 


M 


T 


W 
1 


T 
2 


F 

3 


S 

4 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 

2 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 
2 


S 
3 


A 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




IX 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 

1 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 

1 


S 

1 


IV! 
2 


T 
3 


W 

4 


T 

5 


F 

6 


S 

7 


S 

1 


M 

2 


T 
3 


W 

4 


T 
5 


F 
6 


S 

7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


S 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


28 


29 


30 


31 










29 


30 












30 


31 












30 










































NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








1 


2 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


8 


10 


11 


E 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


2C 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


:: 






28 


29 


30 


31 








26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






27 


28 


29 


3C 


31 






DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 

2 


S 
3 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 
2 


S 

3 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 

1 


S 

2 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 

2 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


S 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


18 


17 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 



1W* 



'IS Niaa3d ::: 




Table of Contents 



Page 

ollege Calendar for 1922-1923 3 

innouncements for 1922-1923 7 

dministrative Officers 7 

acuity 9 

(ichigan State Normal College, Location, Purposes, etc 31 

ie Library 35 

iboratories 40 

>cieties and Clubs 45 

holarships 52 

be American Schoolmaster 53 

ie Normal College News 54 

ie Normal College Extension Lectures 55 

ie Normal Concert Course 56 

ie Normal College Lecture Course 57 

meral Items— Discipline, Teachers' Bureau, Expenses, etc. ... 58 

rections to Students 66 

^cepted Schools 69 

irricula 72 

ipartment Courses 96 

Chemistry 96 

Education 100 

English 107 

Fine Arts 115 

Geography 119 

History and the Social Sciences 123 

Home Economics 129 

Industrial Arts 138 

Kindergarten — Primary , 142 

Latin 143 

Mathematics 149 

Modern Languages 154 

Music 161 



6 CONTENTS 



Department Courses — Continued. Page 

Natural Sciences 167 

Penmanship 188 

Physical Education 189 

Physics 200 

Rural Education 208 

Special Education 211 

Speech 216 

Training Department 223 

Conservatory of Music 231 

Names of Students 249 

List of Graduates 360 

Statistics for 1921-1922 378 

Directory 380 

Index 385 



Michigan State Normal College 

YPSILANTI 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Hon. A. M. Freeland President 

Hon. Fkank Cody Vice-President 

Hon. Fred A. Jeffers 

Hon. Thomas E. Johnson Secretary 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Charles McKenny, A.M., LL.D President 

Clemens P. Steimle, A.B Registrar 

Bessie Leach Priddy, PhJD Dean of Women 

Dimon 'H. Roberts, A.M Supt. of Training Department 

J. W. Stevens Supt. of Buildings and Grounds 



Announcements 

1922-1923 



1922 

Tuesday, January 3 Beginning of Winter Term 

Friday, March 24 Closing of Winter Term 

Monday, April 3 Beginning of Spring Term 

Sunday, June 18 Baccalaureate Address 

[ Degree Class Day 

Monday, June 19, Class Day J Sophomore Class Day 

I Ivy Day 

f Registration and Reunion 
Tuesday, June 20, Class Day J Alumni Meeting 

I Class Reunions 

Tuesday Evening, June 20 Reception 

Wednesday, June 21 Commencement 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Monday, June 26 Classification of Students 

Tuesday, June 27 Recitations Begin 

Friday, August 4 Summer Term Closes 



SUMMER VACATION, AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 

Monday, September 25. Classification of Students 

Thursday, November 23 Thanksgiving Recess 

Friday, December 15 Fall Term Closes 

1923 

Tuesday, January 2 Winter Term Begins 

Friday, March 23 Winter Term Closes 

Monday, April 2 Spring Term Begins 

Sunday, June 17 Baccalaureate Address 

( Degree Class Day 

Monday, June 18, Class Day J Sophomore Class Day 

^ Ivy Day 

( Registration and Reunion 
Tuesday, June 19, Alumni Day J Alumni Meeting 

I Class Reunions 

Tuesday Evening, June 19 Reception 

Wednesday, June 20 Commencement 

Monday, June 25 Summer Term Begins 

Friday, August 3 Summer Term Closes 

Monday, September 24 Classification of Students 

Thursday, November 22 Thanksgiving Recess 

Friday, December 14 Fall Term Closes 



Faculty 



Charles McKenny, A.M., LL.D., President. 

B.S. Michigan Agricultural College; A.B. and A.M. Olivet; 
A.M., University of Wisconsin; LL.D., Olivet. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 
Florus A. Barbour, A.M. 

Professor of English; Head of Department of English. 
A.B. and A.M. (Hon.), University of Michigan. 

Benjamin L. D'Ooge, Ph.D. 

Professor op Latin; Head of Department of Latin. A.B. and 
A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Bonn; 
American School of Archaeology at Rome and Athens. 

William H. Sherzer, Ph.D. 

Professor of Natural Sciences; Head of Department of 
Natural Sciences. B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of 
Michigan; Special Student, Michigan School of Mines; 
Graduate, Student, University of Michigan and Berlin. 

Charles 0. Hoyt, Ph.D. 

Professor of Education; History and Philosophy of Edu- 
cation; Chairman of the Department of Education ; A.B., 
Albion College; Ph.D.., University of Jena. 

Elmer A. Lyman, LL.D. 

Professor of Mathematics ; Head of Department of Mathe- 
matics. A.B., University of Michigan; two years graduate 
study, University of Michigan; LL.D., Berea College, Berea, 
Kentucky. 



10 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Samuel B. Laird, A.M. 

Professor of Education and Psychology. B.Pd., Michigan 
State Normal College; A.B. and A.M., University of Mich- 
igan. 

Dimon H. Roberts, A.M. 

Superintendent of Training School. A.B. and A.M., Amherst 
College; graduate student, Clark University. 

Mark Jefferson, A.M. 

Professor of Geography ; Head of Department of Geography, 
A.B., Boston University; A.B. and A.M., Harvard University. 

Richard Clyde Ford, Ph.D. 

Professor of Modern Languages; Head of Department of 
Modern Languages. Ph.B. and Ph.M., Albion College; 
Ph.D., University of Munich; graduate student, Albion Col- 
lege, Universities of Freiburg, and Munich; research stu- 
dent in Geneva, Paris, London. 

J. Stuart Lathers, A.M. 

Professor of Speech; Head of Department of Expression. 
Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; B.L. and A.M., 
University of Michigan. 

Wilbur P. Bowen, M.S. 

Professor of Physical Education ; Head of Department o, 
Physical Education. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege; B.S. and M.S., University of Michigan; graduate 
student, University of Michigan. 

Nathan A. Harvey, Ph.D. 

Professor of Education, Tests and Measurements, and Re- 
search. Graduate, Illinois Normal University; student 
University of Illinois; A.M. and Ph.D. Illinois Wesleyan 
University. 



FACULTY 11 

Frederick Alexander, A.B. 

Director- of Conservatory of Music. A.B., University of 
Michigan. 

Carl E. Pray, A.M. 

Professor of History; Head of Department of History. 
B.L., Olivet College; A.M., University of Wisconsin; grad- 
uate student, Harvard University and University of Wis- 
consin. 

Frederick R. Gorton, Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics; Head of Department of Physics and 
Astronomy. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal College, B.S. 
and A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Berlin. 

Bert W. Peet, M.S. 

Professor of Chemistry; Head of Department of Chemistry. 
B.S., Michigan Agricultural College; M.S., University of 
Michigan; graduate student, University of Michigan and 
Columbia University. 

Bertha Goodison, A.B. 

Professor of Art; Head of Department of Fine Arts. Grad- 
uate, Michigan State Normal College; student, Detroit Art 
School, Harvard University, Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Landscape Painting, John Carlson. 

Horace Z. Wilber, A.M. 

Professor of Education, Philosophy ; Director of Extension. 
A.B., Michigan State Normal College; A.B. and A.M., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; graduate student, University of 
Michigan. 

Marvin Sumner Pittman, Ph.D. 

Professor of Education; Director of Rural Education. 
A.B., Millsopt College; A.M., University of Oregon; Ph.D., 
Columbia University. 



12 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Jessie E. Richardson, B.S. 

Professor of Home Economics; Head of Department o) 
Home Economics. B.S., Carleton College; graduate stu 
dent, Carleton College and Universities of Chicago ancr 
Minnesota. 



PROFESSORS 

Henry C. Lott, A.M., M.Pd. 

Professor of Education, Ethics and Social Education 
M.Pd., Michigan State Normal College; A.M., Columbia 
University; graduate student University of Michigan andj 
Columbia University. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Fannie Cheever Burton, M.Pd. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. Graduate 
Michigan State Normal College; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigar 
State Normal College; student, Chautauqua, Harvard, Co 
lumbia School of Oratory, University of Utah and Chali: 
School of Aesthetic Dancing. 

Jessie Phelps, M.S. 

Associate Professor of Physiology. B.S. and M.S., University 
of Michigan; graduate student, Universities of Michigan 
Chicago, and Marburg. 

Abigail Pearce, A.M. 

Associate Professor of English. B.Pd., Michigan Stat< 
Normal College; Ph.B. and A.M., University of Michigan 

Maky B. Putnam, Ph.M., M.Pd. 

.Associate Professor of Political Science and Economics 
Graduate, Michigan State Normal College; Ph.B., Uni 



FACULTY 13 

versity of Michigan; Ph.M., University of Chicago; M.Pd., 
Michigan State Normal College; graduate student, Uni- 
versities of Chicago and Michigan, and Harvard University. 

rederick B. McKay, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Speech. Graduate Michigan State 
Normal College; A.B., A.M., University of Michigan. 

Iary A. Goddard, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Botany. B.S., University of Mich- 
igan; graduate student, Cold Spring Harbor Biological 
School, Universities of Wisconsin and Michigan. 

,Lma Blount, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English. B.S. and A. B., Wheaton 
College; Ph.D., Cornell; graduate student, Cornell, Rad- 
cliffe, London, and Paris 

btelle Downing, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; A.B., University of Michigan; A.M., Uni- 
versity of California. 

CRTHA G. BUELL, A.M. 

Associate Professor of History. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; B.L., University of Michigan; A.M., Rad- 
cliffe College. 

phaeles M. Elliott, A.M. 

Associate Professor and Director of Special Education. 
B.Pd. and A.B., Michigan State Normal College; graduate, 
Ferris Institute; A.M., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

BLAND O. NORRIS, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Latin. B.Pd. and A.B., Michigan 
State Normal College; graduate student, Universities of 
Michigan and Chicago. 



14 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Bessie Leach Priddy, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History and Dean of Women. Ph.B. 
and A.B., Adrian College; A.M., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Lid a Clark, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Art. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College and Chicago Art Institute; student, Art 
Academy, Paris; A.B., Michigan State Normal College 
Student of DuMond, Carleson, Church, Freer. 

Clyde E. Foster. 

Associate Professor of Music and Director of Public Schoo] 
Music. Graduate, Holt School of Music and American 
Institute of Normal Methods, Boston, Mass.; student with 
Marie Hofer, Chicago, and Nelson Burritt, New York. 

J. Milton Hover, A.B., B.S. 

Associate Professor of Agriculture. B.Pd. and A.B., Mich 
igan State Normal College; B.S., University of Chicago; 
graduate student, Cornell University. 

Jane L. Matteson, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. A.B., Michigan State 
Normal College; A.M., Cornell University; graduate stu- 
dent, University of Michigan. 

Joseph H. McCulloch, B.P.E. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. B.P.E. , Inter- 
national Y. M. C. A. College, Springfield, Mass. 

Ada A. Norton, Ph.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.B. and Ph.M., 
Albion College; graduate student, University of Michigan. 

.JOHANNA AlPERMANN, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages. B.Pd. and A.B., 
Michigan State Normal College; A.M., Columbia University. 



FACULTY 15 

rHEO W. H. Irion, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Education, Psychology; Secretary 
Department of Education. B.S. (in Education) and A.B., 
University of Missouri; A.M., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; graduate student, University of Missouri and 
Columbia University. 

Ross A. Wells, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.B., A.B., Franklin 
College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

jLEnadine Snow, B.S., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education. Graduate, 
Michigan State Normal College; B.S., Kalamazoo College; 
M.D., University of Michigan; student, American Medical 
Missionary College, Chicago. 

rHOMAS L. Hankinson, B.S. 

Associate Professor of Zoology. B.S., Michigan Agricul- 
tural College; B.S., Cornell University. 

Ierbert H. Foster, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Education, Secondary Education. 
A. B., Cornell University; Ph. B., University of Jena; grad- 
uate student at Cornell University and Columbia Univer- 
sity. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

LllCE I. BOARDMAN. 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. Graduate, Mount 
Holyoke College and Sloyd Training School, Boston. 

Elizabeth Carey, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English. A.B. and A.M., University 
of Minnesota; graduate student, University of Chicago. 



16 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Eyrox S. Corbix, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Michigan Agricultural College; 
graduate student, University of Michigan. 

Ida G. Hixtz, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Speech. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College; A.B., University of Chicago; A.M., Co- 
lumbia University. 

Carl Lixdergrex. 

Assistant Professor of Music. Pupil of Herbert Wither- 
spoon, New York. 



Estabrook Raxkix, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of English. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; student, University of Chicago; A.B., 
University of California; A.M., Columbia University. 






*Ella M. Smith, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Rural Education. Graduate, Mich- 
igan State Normal College; A.B., University of Michigan; 
student, Columbia University. 






e. 



Mabel P. Bacox, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. Graduate; 
Normal School of Physical Education, Battle Creek, Mich- 
igan; A.B., Michigan State Normal College; student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, Harvard and 
Children's Hospital, Boston. 

Axxa M. Wolfe, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., Iowa 
State College; graduate, Chicago Normal School of Physical 
Education. 



•Absent on leave. 



FACULTY 17 



Florence Lyon, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. A.B., Indiana 
University; graduate student, Indiana University and Uni- 
versity of Michigan; student in Curso de Verano Para 
Extranjeros, Madrid, Spain. 

Harry L. Smith, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Physics. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College; B.S. and A.M., University of Michigan; 
graduate student, University of Michigan. 

Clara Janet Allison, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Latin. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal 
College; A.B., University of Michigan; graduate student, 
University of California; A.M., Columbia University; affili- 
ated fellow, American Academy in Rome. 

Helen Finch. 

Assistant Professor of Art. Student, Cumming School of 
Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Broadmoor Art Academy; 
student of Robert Reid, John Carlson, Charles Hawthorne, 
and Henry McCarter. 

Elma McCann Folsom, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of English. Graduate, Washington 
College; graduate student, University of California; student, 
Lei and Powers School of Spoken Word, Boston. 

Faith E. Kiddoo, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. B.S., Iowa State 
Teachers' College; graduate student, University of Chicago. 

Florence L. Lytle, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. B.S., Carnegie 
Technical Institute. 

3 



18 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Bliss Maple, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics, Fall Term, 1921. 
B.S., Purdue University. 

Lloyd W. Olds, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. A.B., Mich- 
igan State Normal College; Gymnastics, University of Mich- 
igan. 

Sara T. Murray, B.S. 

Assistant Professor in Home Economics, beginning January 
1st, 1922. B.S., Carnegie Technical Institute. 



INSTRUCTORS 
Lota H. Garner. 

Instructor in Art. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege; student, Olivet College, Oberlin College, Art Institute, 
Chicago, and Church School of Design, Chicago, Berkshire 
School of Art, Monterey, Massachusetts. 

Edith E. Adams, M.Pd. 

Director of Woodruff Kindergarten and Instructor in Kin- 
dergarten Theory. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege and student in Lucy Wheelock's Kindergarten School, 
Boston; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State Normal College; 
student National Kindergarten College, Chicago. 

Mary E. Hatton, B.S. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 






•Mabion Watson, B.S. 

Director of Normal Kindergarten and Instructor in Kinder- 



♦Absent on leave. 






FACULTY 19 

garten Theory. Graduate, National Kindergarten College, 
and Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Olive Paine, Ph.B. 

Director of Kindergarten, Prospect School, and Instructor 
in Kindergarten Theory. Ph.B., University of Chicago; 
graduate student, University of Chicago. 

Jennie Belle Morrison. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Teachers College, Columbia 
University and Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago, 111. 

Chloe M. Todd, B.Pd. 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College. 

Irene 0. Clark, B.Pd. 

Instructor in Physical Education. Graduate, Michigan 
State Normal College and Chautauqua School of Physical 
Education; graduate student, Columbia University. 

*Russell L. Gee. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 
College. 

Ellatheda Spofford. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 
College. 

Guy R. Newberry, M. Accts. 

Director of Penmanship. Graduate, Ferris Institute, Big 
Rapids, Michigan; Highland Park College, Des Moines, 
Iowa; Palmer School of Penmanship, Chicago, and Koester 
School, Chicago. 



*Absent on leave. 



20 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Margaret E. Sill. 

Instructor in Geography. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 
College. 

Roberta Conrad. 

Instructor in English. 

Jessie C Laird, A.M. 

Instructor in English. A.B., Mount Holyoke; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; graduate student, University of Mich- 
igan; student at Marburg University and in Switzerland. 

Madge Quigley. 

Acting Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; Conservatory of Music, Michigan State 
Normal College. 

Grace Ryan. 

Instructor in Physical Education. Graduate, Michigan 
State Normal College. 



ASSISTANTS 

Carolina A. Supe, A.B., R.N. 

Assistant in Physiology. A.B., University of Michigan; 
R.N., Battle Creek Sanitarium 'Hospital and Training 
School. 

A(;m:s Dodge, B.Pd. 

Assistant in Physical Training. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Northern Illinois State Normal 
School and Chicago Normal School of Physical Education. 

Ruth Bough neb. 

Assistant in Physical Training. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College. 



FACULTY 21 



Inez Selesky, A.B. 

Assistant in Mathematics. A.B., Michigan State Normal 
College. 

Herman Beck. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Rosalind Brooker. 

Assistant in Zoology. 

Mary Moore. 

Assistant in Botany. 

Bertha Warner. 

Assistant in Physical Education. 

Clarence Whitney. 

Assistant in Agriculture. 

FACULTY OF THE TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

Dimon H. Roberts, A.M. 

Superintendent of Training School. A.B. and A.M., Am- 
herst College; graduate student, University of Colorado 
and Clark University. 

J. Burns Fuller, A.M. 

Principal of High School. A.B., Michigan State Normal 
College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

Margaret E. Wise, M.Pd. 

Training Teacher, First Grade. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State Normal 
College. 



22 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Adella Jackson, M.Pd. 

Training Teacher, Second Grade. Student, University of 
Chicago; Clark University; Emerson School of Philosophy, 
Boston; M.Pd. (Hon.), Michigan State Normal College. 

Clyde E. Foster. 

Supervisor of Music. Graduate, Holt School of Music, and 
American Institute of Normal Methods, Boston, Mass.; 
student with Marie Hofer, Chicago, and Nelson Burritt, 
New York. 

Bertha Goodison, A.B. 

Supervisor in Art. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege; student, Detroit Art School, Harvard University, 
Teachers College, Columbia University; Landscape Paint- 
ing, John Carleson. 

Alice I. Boardman. 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. Graduate, Mount 
Holyoke College and Sloyd Training School, Boston. 

Ella M. Wilson, A.M. 

Training Teacher, Fifth Grade. Student, Cornell Uni- 
versity; A.B., Michigan State Normal College; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Edith Adams, M.Pd. 

Director of Woodruff Kindergarten and Instructor in Kin- 
dergarten Theory. Graduate, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege; student, Chicago Kindergarten College and Lucy 
Wheelock's Kindergarten School, Boston; M.Pd. (Hon.), 
Michigan State Normal College. 

Lucia Den shore. 

Training Teacher, Second Grade, Woodruff School. Grad- 
uate Michigan State Normal College; student, School of 
Education, University of Chicago, and Bay View School of 
Methods. 



FACULTY 23 

Elizabeth McCrickett. 

Training Teacher, Third Grade. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College, and Kraus-Boeltz Kindergarten Training 
School; student, Alma College, New York University, and 
Harvard University. 

Mary E. Hatton, B.S. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

*Susan W. Stinson, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Eighth Grade. Graduate, State Normal 
School, Castine, Maine; B.S., Columbia University; grad- 
uate student, University of Chicago. 

Mabel Wombaugh, A.M. 

Training Teacher, Sixth Grade. A.B., Syracuse University; 
A.M., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

[rene 0. Clark, B.Pd. 

Supervisor of Physical Training. Graduate, Chautauqua 
School of Physical Education; B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College. 

'.. Eleanor Meston, B.S. 

Training Teacher, First Grade, Woodruff School. Graduate, 
Saginaw City Training School; B.S., Columbia University. 

/inora Beal, A.M. 

Training Teacher of English in High School and Assistant 
Principal of High School. B.Pd., Michigan Normal Col- 
lege; B.S., Columbia University; A.M., Columbia University. 



*Absent on leave. 



24 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Anna Winifred Field, A.M. 

Training Teacher, Seventh Grade. Ph.B. and A.M., Grin- 
nell College, Iowa. 

*€. Gertrude Phelps, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. Graduate, City Training 
School, Hornell, N. Y., B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

Jennie Belle Morrison. 

Instructor in Industrial Arts. Graduate Michigan State 
Normal College; student, Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, and Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago, 111. 

Florence McLouth, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Third Grade, Woodruff School. B.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Mary McDermott, B.S., A.M. 

Training Teacher, Open Air Room. Graduate, State Normal 
School, Geneseo, N. Y.; B.S. and A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

*Marion Watson, B.S. 

Director of Normal Kindergarten and Instructor in Kinder- 
garten Theory. Graduate, National Kindergarten 'College, 
Chicago; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Greta Forte, B.S. 

Instructor in Music. Graduate, Michigan State Normal 
College; student, University of Michigan School of Music; 
B.S., Columbia University. 

Florence Kelly, B.S. 

Training Teacher, Fourth Grade, Woodruff School. Grad- 
uate Milwaukee State Normal School; B.S., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 



* Absent on leave. 



FACULTY 25 



Blanche Towne, A.M. 

Training Teacher, Special Room. Graduate, Saginaw City 
Teachers' Training School and Lapeer School for Teachers 
of the Defective; A.B. and A.M., University of Michigan. 

Muriel Wilkinson. 

Training Teacher, Rural School. 

Johanna Alpermann, A.M. 

Associate Professor of Modern Languages. B.Pd. and A.B., 
Michigan State Normal College; A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Olive Paine, Ph.B. 

Director of Kindergarten, Prospect School, and Instructor 
in Kindergarten Theory. Ph.B., University of Chicago. 

[nez Selesky, A.B. 

Assistant in Mathematics in High School. A.B., Michigan 
State Normal College. 

jRace M. Skinner, B.S. 

Acting Director of Normal Kindergarten and Instructor 
in Kindergarten Theory. Graduate, National Kindergarten 
and Elementary College, Chicago; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University; graduate student, University of Chi- 
cago and University of Wisconsin. 

Cdxa Bostedor, Ph.B. 

Acting Training Teacher, Eighth Grade. Graduate, Central 
State Normal School; Ph.B., University of Chicago. 

aitii Kiddoo, B.A. 

Training Teacher in Home Economics. B.A., Iowa State 
Teachers College; graduate student, University of Chicago. 



26 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Florence Lytle, B.S. 

Training Teacher in Home Economics. B.S., Carnegie 
Technical Institute; summer student, Chautauqua, N. Y., 
and State College of Pennsylvania. 

Bliss Maple, B.S. 

Training Teacher in Home Economics. B.S., Purdue Uni- 
versity. 



R. E. Rodock, A.B. 

Instructor in Science and Agriculture. A.B., Ohio Uni- 
versity, Athens, Ohio; graduate student, Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 



William Wise, A.B. 

Instructor in English and Public Speaking. A.B., Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Mrs. Leroy Lewis. 

Acting Training Teacher, Fourth Grade. Graduate, Mich- 
igan State Normal College. 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Genevieve M. Walton, A.M. 

Head Librarian. A.M., St. Mary's College. 

Elsie V. Andrews, A.B. 

Reference Librarian and in Charge of Training Department 
Library. A.B., Michigan State Normal College; Library 
School, University of Illinois. 

Elizabeth v. Simpson. 

Chief Cataloger. Library School, Armour Institute, Chicago. 

Grace E. Hatjghton, A.r». 

In charge of Order Department. A.B., University of Mich- 
igan; Library School, Western Reserve University. 



1 



FACULTY 27 

Ethel A. McCrickett, A.B. 

In charge of Periodical Department. A.B. University of 
Michigan; Library Summer School, University of Michigan. 

Helen L. Butler, A.B. 

In charge of Circulation Department. A.B., Routt College; 
Carnegie Library School, Pittsburg. 

Lizzie Trabilcox, A.B. 

Assistant in Circulation Department. A.B., University of 
Michigan. Library Summer School, University of Mich- 
igan. 

Frederick B. Cleveringa, B.Pd. 

Assistant in Periodical Department. B.Pd., Michigan State 
Normal College. 

Martha Rosentreter. 

Library School of the New York Public Library. 



GENERAL OFFICE STAFF 

Agnes Morse Head of the Office 

Bessie Wright Assistant Registrar 

Lyleth Turnbull Stenographer 

Ruth Leas Stenographer 

Helen M. Cook Financial Clerk 

Gertrude Letter Stenographer 

Blanche Walters Stenographer 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT OFFICE 

Ethel E. Taylor Appointment Secretary 

Helen Smith Stenographer 

Matilda W. Robinson Visiting Nurse 



28 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Standing Committees 

The President is ex-officio a member of all committees. 

Appointment — Professor Roberts, with heads of departments as 
advisory members. 

Assembly Programs — Professor Lathers, Associate Professor 
Pearce, Associate Professor Alpermann, Professor Alexander, 
with a committee from the Student Council. 

Athletic Council — Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Burton, 
Professor Peet, Registrar Steimle, Mr. Fuller. 

Bulletins— 'Professor Lott, Associate Professor Matteson, Assist- 
ant Professor Carey. 

Co-Operative Housing — Associate Professor Buell, Miss Hatton, 

Degree Curricula — Professor Ford, Professor Sherzer, Associate 
Professor Blount. 

Entrance Credits — Professor Wilber, Registrar Steimle. 

Extra Studies for Men — Professor D'Ooge, Associate Professor 
Wells. 

Extra Studies for Women — Associate Professor Blount, Dean 
Priddy, Assistant Professor Rankin. 

Honorary Degrees — Professor Jefferson, Professor Barbour, Pro- 
fessor Harvey, Miss Walton, Professor Lyman. 

Health Cottage — Mrs. Snow, Dean Priddy, Associate Professor 
Phelps, Assistant Professor Boardman. 

Lectures — Professor Lathers, Professor Ford, Associate Professor 
Putnam. 

Library — -Professor Pray, Miss Walton, Associate Professor God- 
dard, Associate Professor Norton, Miss Ella Wilson. 

Morrison Cottage: — Associate Professor Buell, Miss Wise, Regis- 
trar Steimle. 

Representatives on Aurora Board — Associate Professor Norris, 
Associate Professor Downing, Professor Goodison. 

Representative on Oratorical Board— Associate Professor 
McKay. 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATIONS 29 



AMERICAN SCHOOLMASTER 

Administrative Board Elected by the Faculty. 

President Charles McKenny 

Ex-Officio 

Estabrook Rankin Bessie Leach Priddy 

Mark Jefferson Ella M. Wilson 

Editorial Board 

Theo. W. H. Irion Mary E. Hatton 

Jane Matteson F. R. Gorton 

Byron F. Corbin, Business Manager 



STUDENTS' COUNCIL 

Officers 

President Donald Holbrook 

Vice-President Florence Adams 

Secretary-Treasurer Beatrice C'arr 

Members 

Senior Class John Reynolds (Pres.) 

Burton D. Wood 
Gladys St. Clair 

Junior Class Eleanor Curts (Pres.) 

Henry Melloche 
Jennie Darling 

Sophomore Class Donald Holbrook (Pres.) 

Herman Beck 
Carl Wheaton 
Florence Adams 
Josephine Warner 
Jane Elder 

Freshman Class Robert Luscombe (Pres.) 

Violet Plaga 
Robert Perry 



30 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Y. M. C. A George Shawley (Pres.) 

Y. W. C. A Evelyn Harr (Pres.) 

Men's Union Bernard Hellenberg (Pres.) 

Women's League Olive Waggoner (Pres.) 

Normal News Richard Ford (Editor) 



Michigan State Normal College 



LOCATION 



The Normal College is located at Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County. 
Ypsilanti is on the main line of the Michigan Central Railroad, 
over which it is readily accessible from all points on the various 
divisions of the Michigan Central system. The Ypsilanti branch 
of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern gives means of approach 
from the south and west. The D. J. & C. electric line passes 
thru the College campus, giving communication every hour with 
Detroit, Ann Arbor, Jackson and intermediate points. The same 
electric line makes connection with the Ann Arbor Railroad, 
at Ann Arbor, with the Pere Marquette system at Wayne, and at 
Detroit and Jackson with the various roads entering those cities. 

PURPOSE 

"The purpose of the Normal School shall be the instruction 
of persons in the art of teaching, and in all the various branches 
pertaining to the public schools of the State of Michigan." This 

tatement taken .from the Act of 1889 revising and compiling 
the school laws, clearly indicates the guiding principle in all 

hat relates to the College. It is with this purpose in view that 
selection of teachers is made, that courses of study are ar- 
ranged, that libraries and laboratories are equipt, and that a 
Training School of twelve grades and kindergarten is conducted. 
The law quoted above also provides that, before toeing admitted, 
ill applicants shall sign a declaration of intention to teach in 

he schools of the state; the student's signature to the classiflca- 

ion card is taken as such declaration to teach. The institution 
stands for three essentials in the preparation of the teacher: 



32 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

(1) a high grade of scholarship; (2) the study of education as a 
science; (3) practice in teaching under expert supervision and 
criticism. 

HISTORY 

The Michigan State Normal School was the sixth state normal 
school in the United States, and the first west of the Allegheny 
Mountains. The law establishing it was enacted in 1849, and its 
first class was graduated in 1854. The average enrollment down 
to 1860 was 279; from 1860 to 1870, 347; ifrom 1870 to 1880, 346; 
from 1880 to 1890, 537; from 1890 to 1900, 975, and from 1900 
to 1910, 2100. The notable increase in attendance since 1900 
is due largely to increast attendance in summer school. This 
in turn is due to the practice of the state superintendent of 
public instruction of calling county institutes in connection with 
the state normal schools. The enrollment for the year closing 
1916 was 3,926. Besides this rapid increase in numbers, there 
has been, during the last few years, a remarkable increase in 
the number of students remaining thruout the year. Another 
notable gain has been in the better preparation of students. 
Since 1890 the number of preparatory students has steadily fallen, 
while the number of graduates of approved high schools has 
steadily risen. There has been a more than proportionate growth 
in the number of teachers, the original number of .five having 
increast to twelve in 1880, and now reaching a total of 103. 
The school for a number of years has been doing work of col- 
legiate grade, and the legislature of 1897, in recognition of this i 
fact, authorized the State Board of Education to designate the 
school, in the courses leading to life certificates and degrees, 
by the name of Michigan State Normal College. Under the 
action of the legislature of 1903, the State Board of Education 
organized courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
and Bachelor of Arts in Education. 

GROUNDS 

The original site chosen contained a little less than six acres, 
Bituated on high ground overlooking the city, which lies in the 



BUILDINGS 33 



Huron Valley. This was increast by something over an acre 
in 1893, when a piece of ground lying to the south was purchast 
for the location of the Gymnasium. In 1895 the city of Ypsilanti 
purchast and presented to the College about five acres adjoin- 
ing on the north. A little later the state purchast four acres 
more. An additional purchase of nine acres by the state, a 
gift of twenty acres from the citizens of Ypsilanti and a gift 
of ten acres jointly by the Athletic Council and the Alumni 
Association has increast the original campus to approximately 
fifty-five acres, upon which are located the College Buildings, 
the heating plant, and the athletic fields. 



ALUMNI FIELD 

The tract of about eight acres known as Alumni Field is sit- 
uated on the north side of the street car line, a five minutes walk 
west of the gymnasium. Four acres have been graded and seeded 
and were used in the fall of 1919 and 1920 for hockey and soccer. 
In the winter of 1921 work was begun on a quarter mile cinder 
track surrounding the other four acres of the field. It is planned 
to move the major sports to this track in the near future and 
leave the smaller fields nearer the center of the campus for 
games and athletics among the general student body. 



BUILDINGS 

The original building, erected in 18i52, was destroyed by fire in 
1859 and immediately rebuilt. This second building now stands 
as the central part of the main building. The front part was 
added in 1878, the west addition in 1882, the north and south 
wings in 1888, giving the building as now used the form of a cross, 
with a length of about 300 feet in each direction. The main 
building contains over sixty rooms, including class rooms, of 
various departments, the library, the offices and the 'high school 
department. 

In 1915 the College dedicated the Frederic H. Pease Auditorium. 
This is a beautiful building of the classic order of architecture. 
5 



31 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



It has a seating capacity of two thousand, is of fire proof con- 
struction and has all the conveniences and appliances of the 
most modern concert hall. The auditorium was named for Pro- 
fessor Frederic H. Pease, who for thirty-five years was director of 
the conservatory and gave it an extended and honorable repu- 
tation. 

The Administration Building is located just south of the main 
hall on the portion of the campus formerly occupied by the con- 
servatory of music and south wing. The structure contains the 
various offices, class rooms of three departments, and a well- 
lighted picture gallery. The building is of the same class of 
architecture as the Pease Auditorium. Its dimensions are seventy- 
five by one hundred seventy feet. 

Science Hall is a building of modern construction with spacious 
Class rooms and laboratories for the departments of biology, 
chemistry, physics, geology, and nature study. 

The original gymnasium, build in 1893-4, was 100 feet square 
and was located across the street south and a little west of the 
main building. In 1913 an addition 85 by 125 feet was built at 
the west end of the former gymnasium, and in the following year 
the basements were reconstructed and equipped with a modern 
bathing outfit. A kitchen and serving pantry alongside the new 
gymnasium provide facilities for preparing and serving banquets, 
and were used in the summer of 1920 to serve meals for a large 
number of students. 

Health Cottage is the name given to the College hospital. The 
building is in charge of a trained nurse and is free to students 
unless a protracted sickness requires the attendance of a special 
nurse. The hospital has seven beds and has proved adequate to 
the college demands. 

The Training School building furnishes accommodations for a 
kindergarten department, the eight grades of the elementary 
school and an open air room for children who are of delicate 
physical constitution. It contains an assembly hall which seats 
between four and five hundred, a gymnasium, a library and rooms 
for the department of Home Economics. 

The Home Economics department is located in specially equipt 
rooms in the west wing of the Training School building. The 



THE LIBRAE Y 35 



rooms include a modern kitchen laboratory and two sewing rooms, 
together with a suite for serving and an up-to-date laundry. 
They are light and attractive and offer an opportunity for thoro 
training in Home Economics. The Ellen Richards House is 
the name given to the cottage in which groups of Home Eco- 
nomics students live for part of their senior year, thereby gain- 
ing real experience in practical housekeeping. 

Each grade room in the Training School building is furnisht 
with two recitation rooms, which make possible training facil- 
ities for the large number of teachers who must pass through 
this department. 

Starkweather Hall, the gift of Mrs. Mary Starkweather, is a 
substantial and beautiful stone building, used freely as a social 
center by the students of the college. The building contains the 
offices of the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciations, a large, sunny living room with a table of current maga- 
zines, a rest room, a kitchen, and an assembly hall. 



Library 



The library numbers 49,200 volumes. It is open from 7 a. m. 
to 9 p. m. from Monday to Saturday in term time, and from 8-12 
a-, m. on all vacation days. 

In the Reading Room three thousand books are on open shelves, 
free of access, and also the current numbers of periodicals and 
newspapers, of which about 230 are currently received. The 
books comprise: 

(1) General dictionaries, cyclopedias, commentaries, atlases, 
miscellaneous books of quotations, literary helps and compendia, 
year-books, almanacs, etc., etc. 

(2) Bound files of general magazines, with Poole's index, the 
Readers' guide, and other general indexes. 

In the Stack rooms the iron stacks of the Library Bureau are 
used. The Dewey classification is followed, and access is re- 
stricted to students who assist in the library. 



36 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



STUDENTS ASSISTANTS 

Students desiring to work in the Library apply to the librarian; 
a regular hour daily, is assigned, and promptness and regularity 
are demanded. No credits are given for this work, but free access 
to the shelves at all times and the knowledge acquired of books 
and of library work are considerd a good equivalent. 

The librarian meets students desiring this work one hour a 
week on Thursday at 1 o'clock for practical instruction in the 
use of books and libraries, and reference work as teachers. Be- 
sides the' service at the delivery desk, special work is assigned 
each student. » 

This course is a prerequisite for all student assistants. 

DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES 

The department libraries of from 100 to 1000 volumes each, are 
growing slowly but steadily. These constitute an effective addi- 
tion to the equipment of the class room for ready and special 
reference. Several of the departments have special card catalogs 
of subjects relating to their particular work. These give more 
complete and detailed reference than would be possible in a gen- 
eral catalog of the library, and greatly facilitate the research 
work of the student. 

The Natural Science Department has accumulated the nucleus 
of a teachers' library of texts, guides, helps and supplementary 
readers. This now includes important works relating to zoology, 
physiology, botany, and geology. Pupils and visiting teachers 
who desire to make a comparative study of texts, or to learn 
what is available in these subjects, are cordially invited to make 
use of this library. The general library is supplied with the 
important books of reference, periodicals, manuals and advanst 
texts, relating to the natural sciences. 

The nature study library used at Chautauqua by Miss Anna 
A. Schryver for a number of years has been turned over to the 
Department, with its reference catalog. Most of the publishers 
have donated their Nature Study and Elementary Science books 
of more recent date, so that there is now available for cxamina- 



THE LIBRARY 37 



tion by those interested a very complete set of such literature 
relating to the grades. 

The Agricultural department is building up a working library 
of texts and reference books on agriculture, and also accumu- 
lating the most useful bulletins covering the various phases of 
this subject. This collection is to be found in room F of Science 
Hall and is freely accessible to all. 

About two hundred authoritative, modern texts dealing with 
all phases of sex education, and of mental hygiene, have been 
collected during the last few years by the teachers and the stu- 
dents of the physiology classes. A few of the books have been 
contributed; most have been purchased from funds raised by 
small fees imposed on those classes in which no text had to *be 
purchast. Thus an easily available, working loan library is 
on open shelves for the use of all students of the special 
physiology classes. Room K, Science Hall. 

The Physical Science department has a working library on 
each floor consisting of nearly 300 important works of reference 
in physics and astronomy, and excellent sets of portraits of 
eminent scientists. 

A special card catalog with some eight thousand references 
enables students to use these books and portraits effectively. The 
department also possesses a large collection of physical and 
astronomical lantern slides. 

The physical education department has a library containing 
between 400 and 500 volumes and a card catalog quite fully 
workt out for the principal topics in physical education and 
hygiene. Eight or ten of the magazines of most interest to 
students of this department are on file here as well as in the 
general library. 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT LIBRARY 

The connection between the Library and the Training De- 
partment is very close. From the 'General Library many volumes 
are drawn every hour for supplementary reading, for the prepara- 
tion of lessons and for illustrative helps in teaching. For over 
twentynfive years each grade has had a class room library. Eight 



38 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

years ago a Training Department Library was opened, in charge 
of a regular assistant. It contains 3,000 volumes, on open 
shelves, and also a collection of 4,000 pictures. Primarily a 
reference library for the students who are teaching it is also a 
laboratory for classes in literature for the grades; and circulat- 
ing library for the children of the Training Department. 

HOW TO USE THE LIBRARY 

1. The library will be open — 

Mondays to .Saturdays, inclusive, 7:00 a. m. to 9:00 p. m. 
Vacation days (excepting legal holidays), 8:00 a. m. to 12 m. 

2. All students are entitled to the full use of the Library at all 

times, subject to the following regulations: 

a. Silence shall he strictly observed. 

&. Students shall use in the Library only the books and peri- 
odicals there provided. 

c. No book, periodical, or work of reference shall be taken 
from the Library until charged at the Loan desk. 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS 

3. A charging slip of the regulation form must be left, signed 

toy the person drawing the book, periodical or work of 
reference, and giving the author, title, and accession num- 
ber as indicated on the slip. This slip will be supplied at 
the Loan desk. 

a. All hooks may be drawn for class room use. 

b. Works of reference and periodicals may be taken for 
work on the campus only and must be returned at the close 
of the class hour. 

c. Books for home study may be reserved from 7:00 a. m. to 
5:00 p. m. and taken from the Library between 3:00 and 
6:00 p. m. Reserved books must be charged on slips, and 
returned before 9:00 a. m. the next day {Saturday morning 
included) unless the Librarian extends the time. 

d. No books for home use will be issued after 6:00 p. m. 

e. All books are subject to recall. 



THE LIBRARY 39 



/.All books shall be returned to the Library at the close of 

each term. 
g. Any book lost or damaged must be replaced. 

THE CAED CATALOG 

4. The catalog is a list of all books in this library. It is on 

cards arranged as follows: 
1st — The Author catalog is a list in alphabetic order of the 

names of the authors of the books, with their titles. 
2nd — The Title and Subject catalog is a list in alphabetic 

order of the titles of the books and the subjects of which 

they treat. 

In calling for books at the Delivery desk, give author, title, 

and call number. The call number is in the upper left 

corner of each card. 

INDEXES TO PERIODICALS 

Poole's Index; Readers' Guide; Annual Magazine Subject Index; 
Dramatic Index. 

These indexes, and a List of bound periodicals in this Library, 
will be found in the R. L., case 24. For Official list see Card 
catalog. 

Look in indexes for subject wanted, and consult the List of 
bound periodicals in the College Library. In indexes, Atlan. 
10:464-8 means Atlantic vol. 10, pages 464 to 468. 

For key to abbreviations of periodicals, see first page of indexes. 

Periodicals markt R. L. (Reference Library) are in the 
Reading Room, free of access, arranged in alphabetic order by 
title, beginning in Case 1. For all others, ask at Delivery desk, 
giving title, volume, and call number of periodical. 

BOOK LISTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES 

Reference lists must be verified in the Card catalogue and in 
the List of bound periodicals. 



40 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Laboratories 



BIOLOGICAL 

Science Hall affords facilities for biological study. Several 
rooms are devoted to botany, physiology and zoology, two of 
which are large, finely lighted laboratories. The laboratories and 
lecture rooms contain fairly complete collections for illustrative 
purposes and for systematic study, supplemented with charts 
and models. The department possesses a full equipment of 
compound dissecting microscopes, microtomes, tanks and 
acquaria, and the apparatus and instruments required for modern 
biological work. A fairly complete bird collection is available 
for study containing representatives of most of the local forms. 
The herbarium contains some four thousand mounted plants 
from various sections of the United States and Canada. 

A vivarium-room contains live forms used in the various work 
of the department. The zoological collection has been enriched 
by a valuable skull series, the donation of the late Dr. John M. 
Watling, of Washington, D. C. The collection represents the 
work of many years' study of the dentition of the vertebrates. 



AGRICULTURAL 

A new agricultural laboratory has just been completed at the 
west end of the greenhouse. This laboratory contains tables 
and facilities for work in soils, farm crops and pliant propaga- 
tion. By opening directly into the greenhouse, it is thus very 
conveniently located for all practical purposes. The greenhouses 
also contain much representative agricultural material for illus- 
trating various methods of plant propagation, plant culture, etc. 

The science gardens are divided into flower, vegetable and crop 
sections, where may be found growing throughout the summer a 






LABORATORIES 41 

vide range of agricultural plants for illustrating the work not 
Lnly in agriculture but in nature study and botany as well. The 
Normal College also owns considerable farm land which will 
Le utilized for work in farm crops. 

There is being accumulated an room P in Science Hall a large 
lumber of charts, pictures, lantern slides, demonstration material 
md demonstration apparatus necessary for the successful leadi- 
ng of the agricultural courses. 



PHYSIOLOGICAL 

In addition to the zoological collection, which is used in the 
study of comparative anatomy, the college possesses a life-size 
nanikin of French manufacture, articulated and unarticulated 
skeletons, numerous models, special preparations, apparatus, 
starts, photographs and lantern slides. A complete series of 
microscopic mounts is being made. The State Board of Health 
.iberally supplies the department with its pamphlets relating to 
:he nature, spread and restriction of contagious diseases. 



GEOLOGICAL 

By means of purchases and donations the department has 
jbrought together good working collections of minerals, rocks and 
ifossils. Pairly complete illustrative collections are arranged in 
a special room in Science Hall, adjoining the laboratory and 
lecture room. The laboratory is equipped with all needed in- 
struments, apparatus and supplies for practical work upon 
[minerals and rocks. Maps, charts, models, a stereopticon with 
[numerous slides, and a growing collection of photographs, are 
| used to enrich the class work in geology. A full photographic 
loutfit and dark room are available for those desiring to make 
use of them. The moraines of the Huron-Plrie ice lobe and the 
series of beaches of the ancient glacial lakes are within easy 
I reach by electric car. The drift of .the region furnishes an 
abundance of common rocks and minerals for individual collect- 
ing. 



42 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

PHYSICAL 

In Science Hall thirteen rooms are devoted to the instruction 
in physics. Of these, five are located on the first floor and include 
a lecture room, apparatus and preparation room, laboratory for 
advanst experimental work, dark-room for photometry, and a 
large dynamo room which is also the laboratory for advanst 
physical measurements. 

On the second floor are seven rooms, including the large lecture 
room, laboratory for physics 1, 2 and 3, two dark-rooms for 
photometry and photography, two apparatus rooms, the office- 
library, and shop. 

Both lecture rooms are furnisht with direct and alternating 
electric currents, means for darkening the windows, and lantern 
facilities. Various motor-generators and a storage battery system 
installed on first floor supply the lecture tables -and laboratories 
with the necessary direct current for all experimental purposes. 

The apparatus collection of the department contains not only 
the pieces required for the demonstration and experimental work 
pertaining to high school, college and household physics, but 
special equipment has from time to time been procured to illus- 
trate wireless telegraphy, x-rays work, electrical resonance, radio- 
activity, high potential effects; diffraction, polariscopic and spec- 
troscopic work; lantern projection, photography, theoretical and 
industrial photometry, gas calorimetry, etc. A two-step ampli- 
fying wireless telegraph set for receiving time signs from Wash- 
ington is a part of the equipment. 

The reception of the musical programs which are broadcasted 
from Detroit, Pittsburgh, Newark and other stations occurs al- 
most daily during the school terms and has proved to be of gen- 
eral interest to all students. 

CHEMICAL 

Seven rooms are appropriated to chemistry: A store and dis- 
pensing room, a lecture room, a preparation room, a laboratory 
for elementary chemistry, a laboratory for advanst chemistry, 
a combustion room, and a combined balance room and library, all 



LABORATORIES 43 



supplied with the usual equipment for four years of chemical 
work. 

The lecture room is provided with conveniences for lanterning, 
for handling gases on a large scale, and for demonstrating the 
important laws of chemistry. 

The balance room contains 14 sets of balances and weights, 9 of 
which are good analytical balances. There is an excellent chem- 
ical library in this room, much used by students. 

The laboratory for advanst chemistry contains a good supply 
of apparatus for gravimetric and volumetric work; a number of 
drying ovens; a Victor Meyer and a Bechman apparatus for the 
determination of molecular weights; and general apparatus for 
work in physical and organic chemistry, including an equipment 
for fuel testing, and apparatus for qualitative analysis and food 
analysis. 

The laboratory for the work of the first year is especially large, 
commodious, and well supplied with fittings and apparatus for 
working out or verifying the principles of the science. 



ASTRONOMICAL 

The astronomical laboratory consists of an open-air observatory 
upon the roof of Science Hall; an eighteen-foot Warner and 
Swasey dome for the Alvan Clark and Sons' equatorial; a transit 
room for the Brandis tansit, the Negus chronometer and the small 
chronograph; and a draughting and store room for astronomical 
photographs, transparencies, charts, etc. 



FINE ARTS 

The department of Fine Arts occupies the second floor of the 
Administration Building. The class rooms are fine in design, 
and well equipt and lighted. These rooms include a small library, 
with many periodicals and books on art, a lecture room with all 
conveniences for showing lantern slides, and also an art gallery. 
During the year, art exhibitions of various kinds are shown in 
this 'gallery and at the end of the year, students' work is exhibited 
here. 



44 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



GEOGRAPHICAL 

The department has a large collection of books, maps, pictures 
and models with which to illustrate its teachings. An outfit of 
meteorological instruments, including barograph 'and thermo- 
graph, makes it possible to get a very real acquaintance with our 
weather and its sequences. Recently projecting apparatus has 
been installed in the main lecture room for class instruction and 
the department collection of slides is growing rapidly. The 
slides have been prepared from the best book illustrations in our 
excellent library and from Professor Jefferson's photographs 
from his personal travels within the state and elsewhere. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The gymnasium and fields serve as laboratories for this depart- 
ment. The equipment includes three large exercise halls, two 
swimming pools, a rest room, two rooms used for corrective and 
remedial exercises, two examining rooms, a combined library and 
office, and two class rooms. The fields include separate grounds 
for football, and baseball well graded and kept, a fifth mile track 
and fifteen tennis courts. The pools are kept in good sanitary 
condition by filtering and such use of disinfectants as is neces- 
sary. 

The men have two locker rooms and 200 steel lockers; the 
women's locker room is divided to form 120 small dressing rooms 
with 8 lockers in each. Hot and cold water is provided for 110 
shower baths. 

The three exercise halls are equipt with all forms of German 
and Swedish apparatus and with the material for all the minor 
games and athletics. Mats are provided for tumbling. Four 
games of basket ball, volley ball or indoor base ball can be 
played at once, making it possible to carry on extensive tourna- 
ments. One gymnasium has an indoor running track. Each of 
the three has a piano. The three gymnasia open together, making 
an excellent place for social gatherings. The class rooms are 
equipt with a good outfit for teaching anatomy and physiology 
of exorcise. 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 45 



Societies and Clubs 



THE ALUMNI 

Since the Normal was opened in 1852 there have gone from it 
about 16,229 graduates, the great majority of whom have taught 
in the schools of our own and neighboring states. Individually, 
these alumni of the institution exert a considerable influence in 
determining the educational policy of the state with which the 
interest of the Normal College are inseparably connected. Until 
recently there has been very little movement towards organiza- 
tion, but within the last few years a markt increase in this direc- 
tion has been noticeable. There have also been of late more and 
larger alumni reunions, and a considerable number of local or- 
ganizations have been formed. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

This association has been in existence for many years. There 
is a growing feeling that the alumni should perfect an organiza- 
tion that would be better centralized, making it possible at all 
times for individual members of the association to obtain informa- 
tion concerning their classmates and others. In this way con- 
certed action could be had touching matters that would advance 
the interests of the Normal College within the State, and also 
in the larger field outside where many of its graduates locate. 
The Normal College News stands ready to lend whatever assist- 
ance it can to any such project. 

For the present the work of the association is along the fol- 
lowing lines: 1. The holding of College reunions wherever feasible, 
at teachers' institutes, State Association meetings, at the Col- 
lege at Commencement time, and at the annual Michigan Con- 
ference. Special emphasis is placed on the reunions held in con- 
nection with the meeting of the State Teachers' Association. 



46 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Decennial reunions of former classes are held at Commencement 
time in addition to the general meeting. Classes of 1871, '81, '91, 
1901, '10, will hold reunions in June, 1921. 2. The organiza- 
tion of county alumni clubs, whose purpose it shall be to foster 
in every way possible the interests of the College. The nuclei for 
these clubs are now being formed in College by the organization 
of county clubs among the students now in school. 3. The dis- 
semination of items of interest about the College and its grad- 
uates thru the columns of the Normal College News, and Ameri- 
can Schoolmaster, keeping alive interest in the College and the 
Association. 

The officers of the Association for the year 1921-1922 are: Presi- 
dent, Mrs. T. J. Knapp, '96, Highland Park, resigned; Vice- 
President, Henry A. Tape, '12, Milan; Secretary-Treasurer, C. P. 
Steimle, '0'2, Ypsilanti ; Executive Committee, Norman Arthur, '08, 
Detroit, three years; Frederick B. McKay, '04, Ypsilanti, two 
years; Mrs. Dessalie Ryan Dudley, '11, Battle Creek, one year; 
Necrologist, Arthur C. Erickson, '03, Ypsilanti. 

The Association is an active force for good and deserves every 
encouragement. Correspondence giving information about former 
students or members of the faculty is desired and should be 
addrest to the Registrar of the College. 



THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 

The affairs of the oratorical association are conducted by the 
Oratorical Board composed of fourteen representative students 
and a faculty member, who supervise the oratorical, debating, and 
many of the dramatic activities of the college. The art of public 
speaking has long been cultivated at the Normal College and 
oratory and debate constitute a major student activity. Thru 
programs, club work, and inter-society contests, large numbers 
of students become proficient on the platform, many of whom are 
given opportunity to participate in the numerous intercollege 
activities. The college usually participates in two oratorical 
contests and four debates each year, and has a record of having 
won twenty-six of the forty debates in which it has taken part 
since 1900. In 1919-20 occurred the annual dual debate with Hills- 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 47 



dale College, which resulted in two victories for the Normal 
College. 

The Annual Oratorical contest (the 1922 contest being the 33d) 
| held early in January is open to both men and women. They 
contest separately and the winners represent the college in inter- 
! collegiate oratory. Gold medals for excellence in oratory are 
awarded in both contests. This year money prizes of $25.00 
for first place were also awarded in each contest. The College 
is a member of the Michigan Oratorical League, the other insti- 
|tutions being Adrian, Albion, Alma, Hillsdale, Hope, Kalamazoo, 
and Olivet. Its aim is to foster 'an interest in college public 
speaking thru its annual contest held on the first Friday of 
March. Gold medals are awarded to the honor contestants. 

There are four flourishing debating clubs on the campus. The 
Lincoln and Webster clubs offer opportunities for platform train- 
ing among the men, and the Wodeso 'and Willard clubs among 
the women. A keen inter-club rivalry expresses itself in enthusi- 
astic contests. Their work is done under the constant super- 
vision of faculty critics. From these clubs the college inter- 
collegiate debating teams are chosen. The members of the teams 
representing the college are awarded gold medals. 

The association also puts on Shakespearean plays, smaller per- 
formances, an annual Interpretative Reading contest, and an 
annual Freshman Public Speaking contest, in the last two of 
which $40.00 in money prizes are offered. 

NORMAL CHOIR 

See page 240. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The young women of the college have three literary societies, 
the Portia, the Minerva, and the Laonian, each of which has a 
membership of about twenty-five, Including one or more women of 
the faculty, who act as general advisers and literary critics. The 
aim of the organizations is to develop and train the literary and 
social interests of the members. 



48 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

To this end, the work, which varies somewhat from year to 
year, consists in general of studies in art, literature, and travel. 
The Lvaonian Society, which specializes in a study of the modern 
drama, is a sub-branch of the National Drama League of Amer- 
ica. In addition to the regular semi-monthly meetings devoted 
to story-telling, readings, reports, papers, talks and lectures in 
the field prescribed for any given year, there are occasional 
social meetings of various kinds,, which do much to strengthen 
the bonds of good fellowship among the members of the societies. 

THE CONTEMPORARY CLUB 

This is an organization among the women of the faculty which 
has for its object the cultivation of good fellowship among its 
members, the discussion of educational and other matters of 
common interest, and the promotion of more intimate and help- 
ful relations between the women of the faculty and the women 
students. The Contemporary Club is affiliated with the Michigan 
State Federation of Teachers' Clubs. 

NATURAL SCIENCE CLUB 

The Natural Science Club was organized early in 1920, with 
Professor Sherzer as Patron. All students specializing in the 
Natural Sciences or making Natural Science their major or 
minor work are eligible to membership. The number of members 
is gratifyingly large. The meetings consist of reports by students 
and faculty members, and discussions covering a wide range of 
current and popular biology. The program for the year includes 
field trips for observational and collecting purposes. 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

It is the purpose of this organization to promote scientific 

study by reviewing the chemical literature of the day. Some 

attention is given to the chemical industries and recent discov- 

in science. The club holds its meetings once a month in 

i he chemicai] ted are room. 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 49 



Near the end of the college year the members visit some chem- 
ical industries in Detroit or Toledo. The following are some 
of the plants visited: 'Park, Davis & Company, Morgan and 
Wright Rubber Company, Acme White Lead and Color Works, 
Berry Brothers Varnish Company, Detroit Creamery Company, 
National Biscuit Company, Semet Solvay Company (by-product 
coke ovens), Libbey Glass Company, Owens Bottle Machine Com- 
pany, Ford Plate Glass Company, and Sun Oil Company. 

ART CLUB 

The Normal Art Club is an organization to which all students 
are eligible, who, at the close of the winter term, have made 
averages of C in academic subjects, and of B in specializing sub- 
jects. 

THE GARDEN PROJECT CLUB 

The Garden Project Club is composed of interested students 
and teachers of the Agricultural and Botanical departments. The 
primary purposes of the club are to create interest in the prac- 
tical an aesthetic features of plant life, and to dispose in a prac- 
tical way of the materials which are produced in the regular 
routine work of the two departments. Thru the efforts of the 
club a valuable and much needed collection of vases has been 
added to the equipment of the Natural Science department. 



HISTORY CLUB 

The history club is managed and organized by the students 
specializing in history. The Head of the Department is Patron 
of the club. The meetings are held bi-weekly, some important 
field of history being Chosen for the year's work. Regular pro- 
grams are given by members of the club. This year's program has 
been devoted to the study of immigration. Frequent social meet- 
ings are held with the object of fostering a feeling of friendship 
.and solidarity among those especially interested in the study of 
history and allied subjects. 

7 



50 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



THE EUCLIDEAN SOCIETY 

The Euclidean Society was organized January 13, 1916. The 
purpose of this society is to broaden -the knowledge of its mem- 
bers along historical, pedagogical, and practical lines of Mathe- 
matics. Regular meetings are held on the first and third Thurs- 
day evenings of each month. All members of the faculty from the 
Department of Mathematics are honorary members of this or- 
ganization. 

SODALITAS LATIN A 

A Latin Club, known as The Soladitas Latina, was organized 
during the winter of 1915-16 by the students of the Latin De- 
partment. It has a twofold object: first, the cultivation of ac- 
quaintance and good fellowship among the students specializing 
in Latin; second, the stimulation of interest in classical studies. 
There is both a senior and junior branch and the meetings are 
semi-monthly, the two branches meeting together once a month. 
The programs consist of songs, readings, reports, informal talks, 
and presentation of Latin plays. Occasionally the meetings are 
of a purely social character. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLUB 

This club, composed of the students and teachers of the physi- 
cal education department, has meetings for the discussion of 
topics of special interest to the group, social meetings, hikes, 
picnics, etc. One activity of the club is the giving of a mid- 
winter circus; another is a trip to Detroit to see gymnasia, play- 
grounds and various phases of physical education. 



MEN'S UNION 

The men of the institution have organized themselves into a 
society known as the Men's Union. The object of the union is to 
further the fraternal and social life of the men, and to stimulate 
co-operative interest in matters of student welfare. 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 51 



RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The religious activities of the college 'Center in three student 
organizations, the Young Men's and the Young Women's Christian 
Associations and the Catholic Students' Club, each carrying on a 
social and religious program. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The student Y. M. C. A. has proved itself of great value to the 
religious and social life of the young men of the college. It is 
equipt with a large room on first floor of the Administration 
Building. Its meetings are we'll attended and lively discussions 
usually follow. It furnishes opportunity to hear some of the 
best speakers. 

Its methods of finance is unique and is being followed by a 
number of schools thruout the country. Aside from its regular 
meetings are opportunities for Bible and Mission Study classes. 
It is represented by a number of its men at the Annual Student 
Y. M. C. A. Conference held at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The women of the college support a vigorous and efficient Y. W. 
C. A. occupying Starkweather Hall which is centrally located 
among the buildings of the campus and is the gift of Mrs. Mary 
Starkweather. Its homelike rooms afford pleasant places for read- 
ing, rest, or study for all women of the college. 

The Association employs a general secretary who gives her 
entire time to the social and religious welfare of the young 
women. It also carries on all lines of activities customary to 
such an organization. In addition to regular weekly meetings 
it maintains classes in Religious Education and for training 
students for social service in rural communities. Its frequent 
and varied social events offer fine opportunities to young women 
for social recreation. The Association assists in finding employ- 
ment for students who desire to earn a part or all of their college 
expenses and it provides committees to meet new students at the 
trains and interurban cars giving any needed aid or information. 



52 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

THE CATHOLIC STUDENTS' CLUB 

In the years past the Catholic students attending the Michigan 
State Normal College and Cleary Business College have attempted 
to meet in a social way. About five years ago a permanent or- 
ganization was established, and today it is a flourishing club 
with a membership of one hundred seventy-five. 

The meetings are informal gatherings held twice a month in the 
Catholic Club House. Besides the social functions and business 
meetings, the members are privileged to enjoy short talks on 
vital and interesting subjects by men and women of standing 
who have a message worth while. 

The Club is governed by a simple constitution and is main- 
tained by moderate dues. The organization was established to 
promote social intercourse, social (betterment, and a deeper appre- 
ciation of responsibilities and possibilities. 



Scholarships 



For several years the Stoic Society has awarded small scholar- 
ships to students of unusual ability who were doing third year 
work. The usual custom of the Society is to offer a scholar- 
ship of $50.00 which is available for the student's use about the 
middle of the third year. 

E. A. STRONG SCHOLARSHIP 

The E. A. Strong Scholarship of fifty dollars is awarded an- 
nually to some student of exceptional ability who is doing third- 
year work. This is derived from the proceeds of an endowment 
fund establisht by the Stoic iSociety in 1913 and named in honor 
of Professor Strong. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 53 



MORRISON ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP 

The Normal College Alumni Association offers six scholarships 
to women needing aid in order to pursue their education. This 
was made possible thru a bequest of the late Mrs. Emah J. E. 
Morrison, who left to the college her property, a seven-room 
house and certain residuary funds. This property is admin- 
istered by the Alumni Association. The immediate direction of 
affairs and the awarding of the scholarships are in charge of a 
committee of the faculty under the Dean of Women. 

Morrison Cottage affords an opportunity for six women students 
to live on the co-operative plan under the direct supervision of 
a matron appointed by the college authorities. The house, com- 
fortable and attractive, is furnisht rent free, a small weekly sum 
being charged for coal; all other living expenses are pro-rated 
among the residents. The scholarships are good for one year and 
a summer term, and are considered equivalent at present to a 
saving of about $150.00 each on living expenses at the college. 
Further information concerning them may be had from the Dean 
cf Women. 

Persons desiring to be regarded as applicants should send with 
their requests, references as to their scholarship, their character, 
their financial need, and their probable fitness for teaching. The 
college is glad 'to 'Consider recommendations to these scholarships 
from school superintendents, principals and county commissioners 
of schools. 



The American Schoolmaster 



The American Schoolmaster is a monthly magazine publisht 
under the auspices of the Normal College and devoted to the 
interests of general education. It is concerned primarily with 
matters pertaining to the professional aspects of teaching, in- 
cluding school organization, school management, and questions 



54 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

of method. These are considered from the standpoint of the 
teachers' college, emphasis being placed upon the principles in- 
volved rather than upon particular ways of reaching certain 
desired ends. While the publication was designed primarily to 
reflect the views of the Normal College, its scope has been 
widened until now it represents the best thought on present day 
topics as exprest by leading educators in all parts of the country. 
All articles are selected with respect to their value to teachers, 
and thru the publication the College seeks to extend its influence 
beyond the classroom and to prove of service to the teacher in 
active work. 

The immediate control of The Schoolmaster is vested in an 
executive committee of the College Faculty, consisting of the 
President of the College and four additional members. At the 
present time this committee consists of President McKenny, Pro- 
fessor Jefferson, Professor Rankin, Professor Priddy and Miss 
Ella Wilson. The editorial board consists of members of the 
faculty selected by the executive committee. 

The Schoolmaster is not merely a local publication. It serves, 
in a large measure, as an organ of expression for the normal 
schools and departments of education thruout the country. Its 
purpose is to bring within the reach of teachers and students of 
education the latest ideas pertaining to the profession of teach- 
ing, and to give to those concerned with the administration of 
schools and the training of teachers opportunity for an elabora- 
tion and exchange of ideas. 

The Schoolmaster is not maintained for financial gain. The sub- 
scription price is $1.2-5 a year; all money received in excess of 
actual expenses is used in increasing the value of the publication 



THE NORMAL COLLEGE NEWS 



The Normal College News is a weekly educational newspaper 
publlsht under the auspices of the Normal College. Altho de- 
signed as an institution paper, the News contains much matter 



EXTENSION LECTURES 55 



of a general educational interest. In addition to giving a full 
account of the College life and of the activities of the different 
school organizations, the various departments have opportunity 
thru the News to represent the character of the work being done 
and to give a wider circulation to the ideas which they emphasize. 
Lectures are reported thru the News and important announce- 
ments made; also by means of this publication the various Col- 
lege interests are unified and the alumni and the schools of the 
state are kept in close touch with t/he Normal College. 

The News is under the control of the College faculty, the 
direct management being vested in a committee of the faculty 
with a managing editor selected from the student body. 

The subscription price of the News is one dollar fifty cents 
per year. Students and others desiring to keep in touch with the 
interests of the school cannot well afford to be without the pub- 
lication. 



NORMAL COLLEGE EXTENSION LECTURES 



The State Normal College has prepared and will send on re- 
quest a special bulletin concerning courses of extension lectures. 
The work done in other years will be much increast and will be 
adapted in every way to meet the needs of educational work in 
city, village and rural communities. 

Persons wishing extension lectures before their formal an- 
nouncement by bulletin should write the president and arrange- 
ments will be made. It should be borne in mind that the most 
convenient dates are, of course, Friday evenings and Saturdays. 
Members of the faculty are prepared to give also commencement 
addresses and to do institute work for which regular charges 
are made. 



5G NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



NORMAL CONCERT COURSE 



Frederick Alexander, Director 

A series of concerts running thruout the college year brings to 
Ypsilanti many of the most distinguished artists and musical 
organizations of the world. Since the year 1909 the list includes: 
Orchestras: Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, Con- 
ductor (3 seasons). 
Russian Symphony (2 seasons), Modest Altschuler, Conductor. 
New York Symphony (2 seasons), Walter Damrosch, Conductor. 
Minneapolis Symphony, Emil Oberhoffer, Conductor. 
Detroit Symphony (2 seasons), Weston Gales, Conductor. 
The Barrere Ensemble (2 seasons). Wood-wind instruments 

from the New York Symphony. 
The Longy Club (2 seasons). Wood-wind instruments from the 

Boston Symphony. 
The Kneisel Quartet. 

Societe des Instruments Anciens: Maurice Hewitt, Quinton; 
Henri Cassadesus, Viole d'Amour; Eugene Dubruille, Viole 
de Gambe; Maurice Devilliers, Basse de Viole; Clavecin, 
Madame Regina Patorni. 
Trio: Witek-Malkin Trio. 

Singers: Anna Case, Florence Hinkle, Corrine, Rider-Kelsey, 
Janet Spencer, Gertrude Rennyson, Eleanor Hazzard Peacock, 
Annis Dexter Gray, Carl Lindegren, Louis Graveure. 
Pianists: Harold Bauer, Percy Grainger, Eleanor Spencer, Georgia 
Richardson, Baskervil'le, Clara Mannes, Mary Dickinson, John 
Powell, Vera Richardson, Richard Buhlig. 
Violinists: Maude Powell, David Mannes, Anton Witek, Sascha 

Jacobinoff. 
Violincellists: Elsa Ruegger, Josef Malkin, Willem Willeke. 
Miscellaneous: Mme Liza Lehmann and Vocal Quartet from Eng- 
land, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Dolmetsch, Harpsichord and Clavi- 
chord Recital, The Fuller Sisters from England in Old English 
P>;i1];h1s and Folksongs, The Orpheus Club of Detroit. 






NORMAL CONCERT COURSE 57 



During the year 1917-1918 the following concerts were given: 

October 17 

Sacha Jacobinoff - - - Russian Violinist 

Vera Richardson - - - American Pianist 

November 5 
Louis Graveure - - Belgian Baritone in a Song Recital 

December 7 

Societe des Instruments Anciens 

Maurice Hewitt, Quinton; Henri Cassadesus, Viole 
d 'Amour; Eugene Dubruille, Viole de Gambe; Maurice De- 
villiers, Basse de Viole; Clavecin, Madame Regina Patorni. 

December 13 

Christmas Music Alia Cappella 
Normal College Choir, 200 Singers 

January 9 

Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, 94 Players 
Leopold Stokowski, Conductor. 
Course tickets, reserved seats, are sold at the advance sale at 
.00. Second sale, one seat to each student enrolled in the Normal 
liege, $3.00. Single concerts are $2.00. 

NORMAL COLLEGE LECTURE COURSE 

The Normal College Lecture Course offers to the students an 
cportunity to hear some of the leading thinkers and speakers of 
t'3 country. During the last few years there have appeared in 
t.s course such noted men as ex-President Taft, Newell Dwight 
Wilis, Dr. Stiner, Beatrice Forbes Robertson Hale and Champ 
Cark. 
The course for the present year consisted of the following num- 



58 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

bers: Judge Marcus Kavanaugh, Gerrit A. Beneker, Profess* 
Percy Holmes Boynton, Emiline-Pankhurst, Maud Wood Park ai 
an amateur production of a comedy put on under the directs 
of the school. 

Tickets for the entire course have been sold during the past ye 
for 50 cents to students and one dollar to others. 



General Items 



STUDENT WELFARE 

The college authorities appreciate the solicitude which paren 
feel when they send their sons and daughters away to scho 
and they also appreciate the great responsibility which a colle; 
assumes in the care and training of the young men and worn* 
who come to it. No subject is given more serious considerate 
by the faculty of the Normal College than the physical and mor 
welfare of its students. 



DEAN OF WOMEN 

The welfare of the women students is lookt after by the De<- 
of Women who takes a direct interest in all matters pertainii 
to their school life. 



THE HEALTH OF STUDENTS 

The health service of the college is in general charge of a faci 
ty committee of seven, of which the Medical Examiner is chai 
man and the Dean of Women and the College Nurse are also mei 
bers. 

All students are given a physical examination each year, 1 
eluding measurement of height, weight and breathing capacit 
examination of chest, nose and posture and a test of vision. A 
pointments for the examination are given out on registration da; 



GENERAL ITEMS 59 



e examinations are given in room 6 of the south gymnasium. 
ie examining physician has office hours during the whole year 

the same room to consult with women students on matters of 
>rsonal health. 

i Classes in remedial gymnastics are provided for those needing 
ij.Ch work; a rest hour is prescribed for cases needing that rather 
:an active work. These classes give credit to satisfy the require- 
ment of the college for physical training; entrance to them is by 
;rsonal arrangement only, following the physical examination. 
iStudents reported 111 are visited by the college nurse or by some 
l&cher assigned to that duty; students suffering from minor ail- 
ments or injuries may consult the examiner or the nurse for ad- 
jce or treatment. In case of illness students may be taken to 
ialth cottage, where the college nurse can give them better care 
Ian they could receive at their rooms. There is no charge for use 
<|the hospital nor for the services of the nurse; a charge is made 
ir meals, and if the case is such that a special nurse is required, 
tp student bears the expense. 

By special arrangement with the University authorities, stu- 
(ints of the Normal College are allowed the same privileges at the 
l! of M. hospital at Ann Arbor as the university students. Under 
tjls arrangement many of our students, securing dates from the 
clllege nurse, go to Aiin Arbor for special examination or treat- 
jfcnt. 

Irhe latest addition to the equipment of our own health cottage 
ilone for testing the eye, so that now students can have the ser- 
ies of an oculist here. 



HOUSING REGULATIONS 



Irhe college prepares a list of approved rooming houses each 
ir. The dean of women will be glad to advise women students 
her by letter or in person in regard to rooms. Since a term is 

shortest period for which rooms are rented, it is advisable that 
dents inspect rooms before renting, if possible. It is advisable 
it rooms be engaged in advance, but there is always a possibil- 

of obtaining accommodations on registration day. On classi- 



gO NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



fication days in the fall, day trains will be met by college girls 
ready to assist incoming students. 

Women students do not room in houses where there are men 
lodgers, either single or married, without permission from the 
dean of women. 

Women students are expected to take care of their own rooms 
and all students provide their own towels. Many matrons require 
students to he responsible for all the linen in their rooms and 
some ask students to furnish cither one extra pair of blankets 01 
one comfortable. 

Students may not move during the term without permission 
from the college authorities. 

If a student wishes to move at the end of the term, notice tc 
that effect must be given the matron fourteen days before the da> 
on which the term ends. Half rent is paid during the Christinas 
and spring vacation to the matron in whose house the student has 
been rooming. This does not hold for students who are leaving 
college. 

SOCIAL REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to observe the customs of good .society 
Attention is called to a few establisht customs. 

Gentlemen callers are received only in the first floor parlor pro 
vided in all approved rooming houses. 

Women students are not expected to entertain gentlemen callers 
more than once a week and such calls are limited to the weel 
end. The calling hour ends at ten. 

Students may attend only those social affairs approved by th< 
college. Women may attend college affairs during the week witl 
gentlemen escorts, but other engagements with men should be con 
fined to the week end. 

Unless women students are attending events approved by th< 
college, they are to be in their homes by ten o'clock. 

Women students who are to be out of town for the week end 
over night or later than six p. m. must register in advance will 
the dean of women. 

Students are advised not to go canoeing unless they can swim 



GENERAL ITEMS 61 



Women students who go to the river or on automobile rides are 
advised not to remain after dark unless accompanied by persons 
approved by the college authorities. 

DISCIPLINE 

The State Normal College is supported by the taxpayers of Mich- 
igan, and is responsible to the state for the character and schol- 
arship of those it sends out to teach in the public schools. The 
administrative authorities have, therefore, adopted the policy of 
asking such students as are found not adapted to school work to 
withdraw from the institution. Students who fail to pass in a 
large part of their work, or whose character and habits are such 
as to unfit them in any sense for the important work of teaching, 
cannot expect to complete the course and receive the sanction of 
the authorities of the institution. Every effort will be made to 
encourage, direct and assist all worthy students, but those who 
do not show promise of good results or are otherwise unfit to go 
into public schools as teachers, will be askt to withdraw. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The college faculty believes that the system of government is 
best that is the outcome of the experience and deliberation of all 
whom the government affects. Acting on that theory it has estab- 
lisht a Student Council composed of members elected from the re- 
spective memberships of the Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., and the 
three college classes. This council meets with the president of 
the college for the purpose of discussion of questions affecting 
tudent welfare. 

LOAN FUNDS 

Loan Fund Association 

For a number of years there has existed in the college a Loan 
"und Association which is in possession of a small endowment 
.vhich is loaned out to needy students. 



62 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Abigail Roe Memorial Loan Fund 

The Abigail Roe Memorial Loan Fund was established in 19 
by the friends of Miss Abigail Fenton Roe, beloved and honon i 
critic teacher in the Training School, and by the Zeta Tau Alpl. 
sorority, of which Miss Roe was patroness. It is loaned to st 
dents in the junior class of high standing in scholarship, chara 
ter, and social and general campus efficiency. 

Contemporary Club Loan Fund 

A fund of $100 contributed and administered by the Center, 
porary Club is now available for use in annual awards to deser 
ing Freshman girls. 

Board of Commerce Loan Fund 

During the year 1921 the Ypsilanti Board of Commerce estal 
lished a loan fund to be used in aiding worthy students with loan 
of small amounts. 

It is the policy of all these funds to make loans which will bli 
payable within one year from date of their loaning and for thi 
reason the loans are usually made to students during their yea 
of graduation. 

THE TEACHERS' BUREAU 

The Teachers' Bureau consists of a committee of the faculty 
which seeks to place each graduate of the institution in the posi 
tion best adapted to his qualifications. These qualifications ar< 
determined by a careful examination of the .student's complete 
record as shown by ihis work done not only in the Training School 
but also in the various departments of the college. The hureai 
seeks in this way to do full justice to every student and is able t( 
give exact and discriminating information to school officials seek 
ing teachers. The work of the bureau has been extended to includ( 
all graduates of the College teaching in the state, with the view 
of giving them all possible assistance in advancing their profes 
sional interests. Full and confidential information will be sent 
school officials concerning candidates. It is our policy not to send 



GENERAL 1115 MS 63 

at general letters of recommendation for indiscriminate use, tout 
) recommend a candidate for the particular position that he is 
ualified to fill. A large number of the members of every gradu- 
tiog class have had considerable experience in teaching besides 
hat obtained in the Training Department. There are among our 
udents and graduates persons admirably fitted for the various 
ligto school principalships and superintendencies as well as for de- 
trimental work in our high schools. In addition, each graduat- 
g class turns out well prepared teachers of physical education, 
>me economics, music and art, kindergarten, county normal 
aining teachers, and a large number who are especially prepared 
r various elementary grades. School authorities are invited to 
sit Ypsilanti, see the students at work, and make selections of 
achers after a personal interview. All letters of inquiry will re- 
ive careful attention. 

- 

STANDARD OF SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADES 

iStudents who fail in two out of four subjects regularly carried 

j|any one term are automatically dropt from the institution and 

my not re-enter except on permission of the proper authorities. 

Ijless markt improvement be shown during the following term, 

try will be requested to withdraw from college. 

The following grades are used by the college, each unit of credit 

ng valued in points as follows: A, four points; B, three 

nts; C, two points; D, one point; E, no points; F, failed; Inc., 

omplete. A student may be markt "incomplete" if some por- 

ti of his work remains unfinisht, providing his standing in the 

rse has been of grade D or higher. To secure credit, an in- 

iplete must be completed within one month after the beginning 

he following term; otherwise, the course will be recorded as of 

gjde P. A failure in a subject can be removed only by re-taking 

tl| subject in class. The final term reports are made out in ac- 

ccjiance with these grades and regularly issued from the office to 

tl parent or guardian of the student. 

tudents who come to us with advanst credits from other insti- 

ons must secure honor points equal to the number of credits. 

illustrate, a student with advanst credit who needs twelve 

m to graduate must secure at least twelve honor points. 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



'To secure the life certificate the student must secure twen 
four units of credit and at least twenty-four points; limited c 
tificate, fourteen credits and at least fourteen points; for tihe A 
and B.S. degrees forty-eight credits and at least forty-eight poin 

This system of grades went into effect at the beginning of t 
fall term 1916. Each unit of credit earned prior to that date 
given points in accordance with the corresponding mark of t 
old system. 

SCHOOL FEES 

For residents of Michigan, $5 for each regular term of twel 
weeks and $3 for the summer term of six weeks. 

For non-residents of Michigan, $10 for each regular term 
twelve weeks and $5 for the summer term of six weeks. 

Students on the Rural School course are not required to pay ti 
above named fees. 

Students withdrawing in the first week of the term may receii 
refund of entire fee paid; from first to fourth inclusive one-h! 
of fee; thereafter no refund. Summer Term: No refund after t 
first week. 

Requests for refund should be given immediate attention as ijl 
date of notification to the General Office is considered the date ! 
withdrawal. 

Under no circumstances will any refund be made except up 
surrender of Receipt. 

Students in the Conservatory of Music who carry subjects 
the Normal courses, pay the same entrance fee as do othe. 
Conservatory students who take private lessons only, pay ea 
term an entrance fee of one dollar and a half ($1.50). 

Every student is required to pay a general fee of $2.50 for eel 
regular term and $2.00 for each summer term. 

At the Oirls' Gymnasium a deposit of 25 cents is required 
the use of a locker key, upon return of which the money is • 
funded, 



GENERAL ITEMS 65 



Laboratory Fees 

Chemistry $1.00 

Home Eccnomics 1, 2, 3, 5, 14, 20, 50, 55, 56 2.00 

iHome Economics 4, 9, 15, 18 1.00 

Industrial Arts 4, 15, 16, 17, each 1.00 

Natural Science 50 

Education 2 25 

Diploma Fees 

degrees $3 . 00 

Life Certificate 3.00 

i 

Conservatory 3.00 

traded Certificate 2.00 

tural Certificate 2 .00 

ligh School 1.00 

ROOM AND BOARD 

The college provides no dormitories. Abundant and convenient 
Doms may be 'had at reasonable rates in the homes of the citizens 
E Ypsilanti. A few rooms may be rented with privilege of light 
pusekeeping. No cooking or eating of meals is allowed except in 
)oms equipt for that purpose. Board may be had in numerous 

ubs situated within easy reach of the College and rooming 

aces. 

Rooms furnisht for two may be rented for $2.00 to $3.00 each 

r week. Students rooming alone pay double rent or nearly so. 

)ard in clubs may be had for $6.00 per week. Four cafeterias 

rve meals. 

There are Opportunities for students to earn part of their ex- 
inses by working in boarding clubs or private families. Those 
(siring such employment should make application early to the 
];an of Women. It is advisable, however, for students to come 

th funds sufficient for the expenses of the first term. 

Where economy is practist, necessary expenses, including room, 

>als, school fees and laundry may be estimated as follows: 
9 



x 66 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 

ESTIMATED TOTAL EXPENSES PER TERM OE 12 WEEKS 

Board, twelve weeks $ 60.00 to $ 72. C 

Room 24.00 to 36.C 

Laundry 5.00 to 10. <] 

Books and stationery 5.00 to 10. 

Registration and other fees 9.00 to 11.0 

Total $103.00 to $139. € 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 



The following regulations apply to all students, are in 
portant and should he attended to promptly: 

Classification for the Fall and Summer terms occurs i 
the Men's Gymnasium; for the Winter and Spring term 
according to announcement given out at the close of til 
preceding term. 

Students on the High School and Departmental curr 
culum are classified under the direction of the heads of tb 
departments in which the specializing is done. 

All students specializing in music should apply at th 
Conservatory for classification. 

Students wishing to take the Kindergarten-Primary civ 
riculum should be classified by Professor Roberts. 

Students on the Grammar Grade curriculum prepare 
tory to teaching in the grades should be classified by Pr< 
feasor Hoyt or Irion. 

Students wishing to take tlie Intermediate curricuhu 
should be classified by Professor Lott. 

Students preparing to take out a Graded School Cert 
ficate should be classified by Professor Harvey. 

Students preparing to take out a Rural School Certil 
rale should be classified by Professor Pittman, 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 67 

Students completing the High School Curriculum should 
>e classified by Principal Fuller. 

Beginning work in any foreign language is not credited 
mtil a year's work is completed. 

When entering, give your name as you want it to appear 
«n your diploma when you graduate. 

Present your credentials (high school or other stand- 
ups) when you pay your entrance fee. A copy must be 
>n iile in the General Office. If you failed to bring your 
redentials with you, send for them and present them at 
he earliest possible moment after your entrance. Blanks 
or entrance standing may be secured from the superinten- 
ent of any accepted high school or by writing the Regis- 
rar before coming. 

All students must be registered and fee paid before en- 
ering classes. 

Order of classification : Fill out all parts of classifica- 
on card and secure signature of classifier. Pay entrance 
>e. Enroll in your classes promptly according to sched- 
le. Each of your instructors will sign your classification 
3rd. Return card to the General Office immediately after 
Gaining the signatures of instructors. 

Leave no classes permanently and make no change in 
assification (excepting temporary changes the first few 
ays) without written permission from the President, 
egistrar or Dean of Women. 

Regular work for a term for a student is four academic 
lbjects and, in addition, usually one and sometimes 
m of the following non-credit subjects : Physical train- 

g, penmanship and music 4c. Regular work for a sum- 
er term is the same as above, except that only two aca- 
emic subjects may be taken instead of four. Students 
ho wish to carry more than this amount must secure 

rmission of the Extra Studies Committee. Petitions for 

i extra subject should be made in writing. Blanks for 
| is purpose may be had in the General Office. 

No further credit will be given for any subject taken in 

high school and repeated here. 

Students bringing credits beyond the requirements for 






68 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAH BOOK 

entrance will receive no advanst credit for the first ye; 
of a foreign language unless it be followed here by a se 
ond year of the same language. 

Leave your Ypsilanti address at the Post Office. 

ADVANST CREDIT 

Under certain conditions credit for work done elsewhere will j 
allowed on curricula here. 

Graduates from County Normal Training Classes who are al 
graduates from approved high (Schools are given credit in eig 
subjects. This enables such students to obtain a Life Certifica 
on completion of sixteen units which may be done in four regul, 
terms, or a year and two summer terms. In doing regular wo: 
it is always advisable for County Normal students to begin with 
summer term, stay thru the following year, and complete t) 
course in the succeeding summer term. 

County Normal graduates who have graduated from approve 
high schools are given credit in six subjects in the graded scho 
certificate curriculum. 

Graduates from the Ferris Institute Normal Course may obta 
a Life Certificate on completion of twelve units of work. The ifa 
ject matter is determined after a conference between the stude 
and the Chairman of the Life Certificate Committee. Graduat 
from the Ferris Institute College Preparatory Course are perm: 
ted to enter as high school graduates. 

Candidates bringing credits from other institutions to be ere 
ited on the life certificate curricula should present them to tl 
Entrance Credit Committee (Prof. H. Z. Wilber, Chairman). 

The Committee on Advanst Credits for Degrees (Prof. R. 
Ford, chairman) may at its discretion allow credits from the f< 
lowing schools: (1) the University of Michigan; (2) the Ag:- 
cultural College; (3) all other regularly incorporated Michig; 
colleges; (4) institutions of like rank in other states. 

All such credits when acted upon by the proper committ 
should be presented to the Registrar for filing in the General cl 
fice. 



ACCEPTED SCHOOLS 69 



NOTES 

The Normal College desires to help those who need to prepare 
»r second and third grade certificates. Classes in the necessary 
lbjects are in progress every term. 

Persons wishing to take up special studies are subject to the 
me conditions of admission as other students. 
Many students for various reasons are not able to complete one 
the regular courses without interruption. To these no credits 
ce earned are lost, and there is no objection to their continuing 
d completing the course at any subsequent time. 



ACCEPTED SCHOOLS 



Recognizing the importance of permanent connection between 

fcb secondary schools of the state and the Normal College, the 

I|ard of Education has adopted a plan whereby formal recogni- 

ta is given to the work done by the public school system of 

IVphigan. The following quotation from the records of the Board 

fellains itself. 

The Michigan State Normal College recognizes that there is a 

lie school system in Michigan. It proposes, therefore, to give 

credit for all work done in the public high schools of the com- 

lwealth that are organized with the prevailing standard for 

p work in this state. The following extract from a resolution 

tt by the State Board of Education, quite fully expresses this 

pecy. 

hat all pupils regularly graduated from twelve-year public- 
ol systems having not less than thirty-six weeks per year, in 
?h four full years are devoted to high school work, with not 
than two thoroly equipt teachers wholly employed in distinc- 
y high school work, be admitted to the regular two years' life 
ificate college courses without examination." 



70 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



THE RELATION OF THE MICHIGAN STATE NORMAL COL 
LEGE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 

The organization of tine School of Education at the Universit; 
of Michigan has changed somewhat the method of transferrin; 
credits from the Normal College to the University. To enter th 
School of Education at the University a candidate must presen 
sixty hours (two years) of academic credit. Persons who hav 
completed the life certificate curriculum at the Normal College an. 
who desire to enter the School of Education at the Universit; 
must take in the department of Literature, Science and the Art 
enough work to make good the sixty hour requirement in aca 
demic subjects. They will then be admitted to the School of Edi 
cation and tine professional work done at the Normal College wi) 
be given credit. 

Persons satisfactorily completing the A.B. curriculum at th 
Normal College will be admitted to the Graduate School. 

CO-OPERATION BETWEEN THE MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAI 
COLLEGE AND THE MICHIGAN STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

The movement for consolidated schools in Michigan is creatin 
a demand for men to fill the superintendencies of these school 
and at the same time teach agriculture. Such men should hav 
training in public school organization and administration and als 
a technical course in agriculture. No single institution in Mich: 
gan furnishes this preparation. 

The Agricultural College offers the training in agriculture am 
the normal schools offer training in public school administratior. 
To meet the situation the normal schools and the Agricultural Co 
lege have adopted a plan of cooperation whereby students ma 
pursue a two-year curriculum at the normal schools which wil: 
combine public school organization, and administration and rura 
sociology and the basic courses in agriculture. This two-year cui 
riculum will be given two years of credit at tihe Michigan Agricu 
t ural Colle 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 71 



THE COLLEGE YEAR 

The college year is divided into three terms of twelve weeks 
each and a summer ^term of six weeks. The regular term begins 
near the first Monday in October, January and April respectively, 
the summer term about July first (see Announcement). Students 
may enter at the opening of any term. 

The unit of work and of credit is a course of instruction in one 
subject involving not less than four recitations per week for a 
term of twelve weeks. This counts as twelve weeks of work or "a 
unit." A student doing regular work carries four subjects and 
completes four units in a term or twelve units in three terms. 
Two units of credit can be earned during the summer term. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who are college graduates, or graduates of accepted 
high schools (see Accepted Schools), will be admitted to the col- 
lege courses without examination upon presenting evidence of 
such graduation. They should in every case present a record of 
the studies they have pursued, with standings. Blanks for this 
purpose will be sent upon application to the Registrar. 

Students who have completed a part of the course of an accepted 
high school will be admitted to the Normal College High School on 
presenting credits of work already done. 

Students who hold first grade county certificates endorsed by 
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction will be admitted 
on the same basis as graduates from accepted high schools. 

Holders of state Certificates will be given one year's (12 units) 
credit on the life certificate. 

DEGREES 

The college grants the A.B., B.S., and M.Pd. degrees. 

The college believes that any person completing a four-year 
course of coordinated subjects designed to fit one to teach in any 
department of the public schools is entitled to a degree indicating 
that he has made such preparation. 



72 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

The A.B. degree is given to candidates completing the four years' 
curriculum described on page 73. 

The B.S. degree is granted to candidates who complete four 
year curricula wihich are more specialized and technical in char- 
acter than the A.B. curriculum. 

The M.Pd. degree is honorary. 



Curricula 



Curricula requiring four years for completion and leading to 
the degree of A.B. or B.S. and a life certificate: 

General Curriculum leading to the degree of A.B. 

General Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 

Home Economics Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 

Physical Education Curriculum leading to the degree of B.S. 

Curricula requiring two years for completion and leading to a 
life certificate: 

High School and 'Departmental 

Grammar Grade 

Intermediate Grade 

Kindergarten-Primary 

Commercial 

Drawing 

Music 

Music and Drawing 

Physical Education 

Rural School 

Special Education 

Curricula requiring one year and a summer school for comple- 
tion and leading to a certificate valid for three years: 

Graded School 

Rural School 



CURRICULA 73 



DESCRIPTION OF CURRICULA 

FOUR YEAR CURRICULA 

Bachelor of Arts Curriculum 

Advisor — Professor Ford and the head of the department in 
which the major work is taken. The bachelor of arts curriculum 
leads to the degree A.B. The forty-eight units which constitute 
the course must be taken in accordance with the following re- 
quirements. 

(1) Four units in Education (1, 2, 3, and 4), four units in 

Teachers' Courses, and two units in Teaching. 

(2) Two units in Composition and Rhetoric, one of which 

must be taken in the Freshman year. The second unit 
in Composition should be taken sometime during the 
second year. 

(3) In addition to the above, five units from each of the fol- 

lowing three groups: 
Group I: Ancient Language, Modern Language, English 

Language and Literature. 
Group II: Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, 

Geology, Zoology, Botany and Geography. 
Group III: History, Political Science, Philosophy and Edu- 
cation. 
The remaining twenty-one units offer opportunity for freedom 
of election and for specialization in one or more subjects. Courses 
must be chosen upon the principle of major and minor subjects 
and can he elected only on the approval of the Advisory Commit- 
tee upon the A.B. Course. With the consent of this comimittee two 
units may be taken in Music and two in Drawing. At least two- 
thirds of the work taken in residence beyond the Sophomore year, 
must be in courses not open to first year students, and no candi- 
date will be recommended for the A.B. degree who has spent less 
than one year of residence at the Normal College and who has 
earned while in residence less than twelve units of credit. The 
senior year or its equivalent must be spent in residence at the 
Normal College. 



74 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

This curriculum leads to the degree of B.S. It offers opportu- 
nity to those who wish to take a full college course in preparation 
for teaching in the elementary grades, or special subjects, such as 
commercial branches, music, drawing and manual arts. 

Requirements: 

(1) Four units in Education, (1, 2, 3, 4), four units in Teach- 

ers' Courses, and two units in Teaching. 

(2) Two units in Composition and Rhetoric, one of which must 

be taken in the Freshman year. 

(3) In addition to the above, five units from each of the fol- 

lowing groups: 
Group I: Ancient Language, Modern Language, English 

Language and Literature. 
Group II: Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, 

Geology, Zoology, Botany and Geography. 
Group III: History, Political Science, Philosophy and Edu- 
cation. 
The remaining twenty-one units are elective and give ample 
opportunity for specialization in specific lines. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



Advisor — Miss Richardson. 

Leads to the Degree of B.S. 

It is desirable that students enter the department at the begin- 
ning of the fall term. 

General requirements for admission are the same as for other 
college courses. One year of high school chemistry, with labora- 
tory practice, is required of all students entering the department. 
Those not presenting this will be required to make it up as a de- 
ficiency. Two years of modern language are required in this cur- 
riculum. Two years of high school credit in modern language 
may exempt the student from taking the second year here, and 
give lor the opportunity to elect other academic work of equal 
credit. 



CURRICULA 



75 



Upon successfully completing this curriculum the student will 
ceive the Bachelor of Science, together with the Life Certificate. 



Fall Term 
bme Economics 4 
iglish 
>ology 

|ne Arts 10 
ivsical Tr., elective 



)nie Economics 4 
lemistry 7 
aderii Language 
lucation 1 



First Year 
Winter Term 

Home Economics 2 
English 
Botany 11 
Fine Arts 1.2 
Physical Tr., W 1 

Second Year 
Home Economics 5 
Chemistry 11 
Modern Language 
Education 2 



Spring Term 
Home Economics 3 
English 
Physical Ed. 5 
Chemistry 3 
Physical Tr., W 2 



Home Economics 6 
Home Economics 10 
Modern Language 
Education 3 



Dme Economics 18 
ine Arts 11 
odern Language 
ilucation 4 



Third Year 

Home Economics 8 
Physics 17 
Modern Language 



Home Economics 9 
Home Economics 12 
Modern Language 



Home Economics 19 Mathematics 



r ome Economies' 11 
|Dr 17 

jcial Science 5 
]pme Economics 15 
i>me Economics 7 



Fourth Year 
Home Economics 11 Home Economics 11 
or 17 
Social Science 2 



or 17 
Social Science 1 



Home Economics 20 Home Economics 21 
Home Economics 30 Home Economics 14 



VOTE — *Two terms of teaching and one of Plome Economics 11 
iractice House) are required of all students in the department, 
ese should be so planned that no student carries Home Econom- 
11 while she is teaching. 

During the fourth year Home Economics 11, 17, and 30 are re- 
red subjects. The others offered may be elected by the students, 
i the requirements may be met by taking subjects in depart- 
ments other than Home Economics. 



76 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Home Economics 16, Cafeteria Management, will be offered ea 
term, and may be taken by students in the department as an el 
tive. 

Hand writing is required of all students in Home Economi 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Advisor — Professor Bowen. 

LEADS TO THE DEGREE OF B.S. 

Life Certificate can be taken at the end of the second year. 
First Year 



Fall Term 


Winter Term 


Spring Term 


Education 1 


Education 2 


Education 3 


Physical Ed. 3' 


Physical Ed. 13 


Physical Ed. 2 


English 1 


Zoology 2 


Physical Ed. 22 or 


Hygiene 1 


♦Elective 


♦Elective 


Men— Msl, M2 or M8 


Men— Ms2, M5 or M6 


Men— Ms3, M5 or I 


Women— Wsl, Ws2 


Women— Ws3,Ws4 
Second Year 


Women — Ws5, Ws6 


Education 4, 5 or 6 


Teaching 


Physical Ed. 19 


Physical Ed. 1 


Physical Ed. 15 


♦♦Elective 


Physical Ed. 12 


**Elective 


Physiology 3 or B 


Botany 11 




giene 2 
Home Economics 


Men— M2 or M8 


Men— M3, M5 or M6 


Men— M4, M5 or M 


Women— Ws7, Ws8 


Women— Ws9, WslO 
Third Year 


Women— Wsll, Ws 


Chemistry 7 


English 11 


Hygiene 3 


Physics 


Physical Ed. 4 or 6 


Physical Ed. 7 or 


Physical Ed. 5 


♦Elective 


♦Elective 


i Elective 


§ Elective 


§Elective 


Men MS, Coaching 


Men — MG, Teaching 


Men — M9 or M 


and officiating 


and officiating 


Coaching and o: 
ciating 



CURRICULA 77 



'omen— Wsl3, Wsl4 Women— Wsl5, Wsl6 Women— Wsl7, Wsl8 

Fourth Year 
elective §Elective §Elective 

elective §Elective §Elective 

tyBical Education Physical Education Physical Education 
iiective Elective Elective 

;*This group of electives to be chosen by the student from the fol- 
ding list: 

iglish 2 or 3 Geography 1 Nature Study Physiology 2 

liglish 8 History 31 Mathematics 11 Speech 1 

^This group of electives to be chosen by the student to accord 
th the requirements for the Degree of B.S. as stated on page 74. 
•"♦Physical Education courses from third and fourth year may 
taken here, not to exceed nine in all for the two-year curricu- 
n. 

land writing is required of all students in Physical Education. 
Students who plan to pursue this curriculum should take in 
h|;h school: 

Two years of foreign language, 
A year each of physics and chemistry, 
Four years practice in all kinds of gymnastics and games, 
A thoro high school course in English, 
ibility to play the piano is a very useful accomplishment for 
^acher of physical training. 



*TWO YEAR CURRICULA 



HIGH SCHOOL AND DEPARTMENTAL 

he advisor is the head of the department in which the major 
tive is taken. 



Substitutions may be made for Hygiene 1 on approval of the 
h€l of the department in which the student is specializing. 

Ul credits earned on any of the two years curricula will count 
ia ill toward the A.B. or B.S. degree, depending upon the charac- 
ter the curriculum pursued. 



78 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



This curriculum takes the place of the specializing curriculi 
which is discontinued. It is designed for those who are preparir 

1. To become principals and superintendents in the smal< 
high schools. 

2. To teach in junior or senior high schools. 

3. To teach in schools having the departmental system. 



REQUIREMENTS 



Required Courses 

Education 1, 2, 3, 

English 1, 3 

Teaching 

§ Hygiene l 
Elective Courses 



4 units 
2 units 
2 units 
1 unit 



9 units 
15 units 



24 units 
Of the fifteen electives not more than nine may be taken in ;>* 
one department. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS 
Hand Writing— All candidates for graduation must obtain 

credit in handwriting. 
Physical Training— ^Four terms of physical training are requi I 

Men take Physical Training m2, 1, 5, and 9. Women t e 

an elective followed by w 1, 2, and 3. 



GRAMMAR GRADE CURRICULUM 

Advisors— Professor Hoyt and Profession Irion. 

This curriculum is practically the same as the old General I 
riculum. 

As the name implies, this curriculum is designed for those 
expect to teach in the seventh and eighth grades. The courses 
largely specified because the curriculum of the seventh and ei(| 
grades is definite in character. 



CURRICULA 79 



REQUIREMENTS 



Education 1, 2, 3, 4 


4 units 


Fine Arts 1 and 2 or 3 


2 units 


Mathematics 11 


1 unit 


Geography 1 


1 unit 


Speech 1 


1 unit 


English 1, 3, 13 


3 units 


Physiology 2 or Hygiene 1 


1 unit 


History 31 


1 unit 


Social Science 3 


1 unit 


Teaching 


2 units 


Music 4 


1 unit 


Six Electives 


6 units 



24 units 
In addition — 
Handwriting 
Music 4 c 

Physical Training — Men take Physical Training 
m2, 1, 5 and 9. Women begin with an elective, 
followed by w 1, 2 and 3, or w 4, 5, 6. 
Summary of the Grammar Grade Curriculum: 

Prescribed subjects 18 units 

Electives 6 units 



24 units 



Electives may be chosen at the option of the student, provided 
that three related subjects be elected in some one department, and 
that students may not elect more than two units in the following 
departments: Fine Arts, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Kin- 
dergarten, Physical Education, Education, Special Education or 
Music. 

In choosing their electives students should be careful to take 
the subjects in the order recommended by the various departments 
in order that the proper sequence of subjects may be followed. 



80 



NORMAX COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



INTERMEDIATE GRADE CURRICULUM 

Advisor — Professor Lott. 

This curriculum meets the needs of those who are to teach in 
grades four, five, and six. In these grades geography is one of the 
outstanding subjects and is consequently given a prominent place. 



Requirements 








Education 1, 2, 3 




3 


units 




English 1, 2, 9 




3 


units 




Nature Study 3 




1 


unit 




History 12 




1 


unit 




Hygiene 1 or 










Physiology 2 




1 


unit 




Geography 1, 3, 5 




3 


units 




Teaching 




2 


units 




Speech 1 




1 


unit 




Mathematics 11 




1 


unit 




Music 4 




1 


unit 




Fine Arts 1, 2 




2 


units 




Industrial Arts 16 




1 


unit 




Four electives 




4 


units 






24 


units 




In addition: 










Handwriting 










Music 4 c 










Physical Training, four terms; 


elective, 


followed by w 4, 


5 ; 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY CURRICULUM 

Advisor — Professor Roberts. 

In line with the most advanced practice in education, this course 
purposes to unify the kindergarten with the work of lower ele- 
mentary grades and to that end is intended to meet the needs 
tliruout the state for well trained kindergartners and primary 
teachers. 

On account of the necessity for musical ability on the part of 



CURRICULA 



81 



kindergarten teachers, in addition to other general requirements, 
those who expect to follow this particular line mast be able to play 
piano reasonably well. 



Requirements 

Freshman Year 

Education 1, 2, 3 3 

English 1, 2 2 

Speech 1 X 

Fine Arts 1, 2 2 

Kindergarten-Primary 1, 2 2 

Music 4 1 

Industrial Arts 17 1 



In addition: 

Physical Training, elective. 

Handwriting 
Suggested electives: 

Education 4. 

Home Economics 7 (Home Nursing). 

Social Science 1. 
11 



units 

units 

unit 

units 

units 

unit 

unit 





12 units 


In addition: 




Physical Training w7, 8, 9. 




Music 4c. 




Sophomore Year 




English 8 


1 unit 


Mathematics 11 


1 unit 


Nature Study 1 


1 unit 


History 30 


1 unit 


Music 5 


1 unit 


Teaching (Kindergarten) 


2 units 


Teaching (Primary) 


2 units 


Three electives 


3 units 



12 units 



82 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

English 4. 
Hygiene 1. 
Mythology 1. 
Modern Language. 
Geography. 
Speech 9. 
Speech 13. 



COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM 

Advisor — Professor Yv T ells. 
The College offers no commercial work, but in connection witl 
the Cleary Business College, Ypsilanti, Ferris Institute, Big Rap 
ids, and the Detroit Business Institute and the Detroit Busines; 
University, Detroit, it offers a two year commercial course. Th< 
college accepts the commercial work of these institutions and re 
quires a year's work in residence. The student pays the regula 
fee of the business college in which he takes his commercial work 
For the work done at the Normal College he pays the regular col 
lege tuition fees. 

Subjects required in the Normal College: 
Education 1, 2, 3 and 4. 
Social Science 3 and 5. 
English 1. 
Geography 5. 
Four electives. 
In addition: 
Physical Training — Men take Physical Training ml, 2 and I 
or 9; women take Physical Training wl, 2 and 3. 



CURRICULA 83 



FINE ARTS CURRICULUM 

Students specializing in Fine Arts should take the following 
named courses in the order given: 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

Education 1 Education 4 

Fine Arts 1 Fine Arts 6 

Fine Arts 2 Industrial Arts 15 

Speech 1 Geography 1 or History 31 
Phys. Tr. wl, w2 and one Phys. Tr., w3 

other Fine Arts 15 

Education 2 Industrial Arts 7 

Fine Arts 3 Teaching Art (2 units) 
Industrial Arts 17 
English 1 

Handwriting Fine Arts 17 

Education 3 Mathematics 11 or Nature 

Fine Arts 16 or 18 Study 

Fine Arts 5 Elective — Fine Arts 

Fine Arts 9 * Teaching in Grade (1 unit) 

Students combining Fine Arts and Industrial Arts should take 
the following subjects: 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Courses 1, 2, 7, 15, 16, 17. 

FINE ARTS 

Courses 1, 2 or 3, 5, 6, 9, 15 or 16, 17 or 18. 

For description of Industrial Arts courses see page 13S. 

For combined curriculum in Music and Fine Arts see page 86. 
In addition: 

The additional subjects mentioned under the Grammar Grade 
curriculum, see page 79. 

Students specializing in Fine Arts are required to teach two 
terms in Fine Arts and one term in the grades. 



84 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS CURRICULUM 



Fall 
Education 1 
Pine Arts 1 
Industrial Arts 1 
Mathematics, 11 
Phys. Tr., elective 

Industrial Arts 3 
Industrial Arts 17 
Elective 
Teaching 

(Grade or Special) 



FIRST YEAR 

Winter 
Education 2 
Fine Arts 2 or 3 
Industrial Arts 16 
English 1 
Phys. Tr., wl 

SECOND YEAR 

Industrial Arts 7 
Industrial Arts 4 
Elective 
Teaching 
Handwriting 



Spring 
Education 3 
Fine Arts 9 
Industrial Arts 2 
Nature Study 1 
Phys. Tr., w2 

Industrial Arts 5 
Industrial Arts 15 
Elective 
Geography 1 



MUSIC 






PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

The Normal (College offers exceptional opportunity for the train- 
ing of teachers of public school music. The Conservatory of 
Music, which is affiliated with the college, offers instruction in 
voice, piano, organ and orchestral instruments. See page 29, Con- 
servatory.) One with a fairly good voice and an appreciation of 
music, who is also a high school graduate, would he qualified to 
enter the Public School Music Department. For years the college 
has been unable to meet the calls for teachers of public school 
music. 



MUSIC CURRICULA 



85 



TWO YEARS' PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC CURRICULUM 

First Year Second Year 



1. Music 1 

2. Music 14 

3. English 1 

4. Education 1 

5. Music 26 

6. Phys. Tr., elective 

1. Music 2 

2. Music 15 

3. Music 5 

4. Education 2 

5. Music 26 

6. Phys. Tr. W 1 

1. Music 2 

2. Music 16 

3. Music 6 

4. Education 3 

5. Music 26 

6. Phys. Tr. W 2 



FALL 
1. 

2. 



Music 11 
English 4 

Teaching Music in Training 
School 



WINTER 

1. Music 12 

2. English 5 

3. Teaching Music in Training 

School 

4. Phys. Tr. W 3 

SPRING 

1. Music 13 

2. English 8 

3. Music 8 

4. Elective 



The first year's work must be completed before entering the 
Training Department. 
Handwriting is required of all students in Music. 
All students are required to classify in Normal Choir (Music 
29), which assembles evenings thruout the college year as 
follows: 

Tuesday — 6:15-7:15 Sopranos and Contraltos 

7:15-8:15 Tenors and Basses. 
Thursday— 7-8 Full Choir. 



86 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC AND DRAWING 

The current systems of public schools create a demand for 
Supervisors of Music in connection with some other subject — 
the popular other subject, from the standpoint of the demand, 
has come to be drawing. The Normal College is unable to fill 
the positions that come to the notice of its officers each year for 
Supervisors of these two subjects. The frequency of these op- 
portunities to our graduates for excellent positions has created a 
popular desire to enter this double course — a desire that is 
sometimes not justified by sufficient latent ability in both sub- 
jects in the student. Normal Conservatory opens its doors for 
the purpose of instruction, encouragement and inspiration to 
all ambitious workers in the arts but it enrolls upon its roster 
of prospective Supervisors only those who have special talent 
for both subjects elected. Sometimes students prepare in both 
subjects and after a teaching experience drop one subject, be- 
coming specialists in either music or drawing, as talent and cir- 
cumstances determine. 

The various drawing subjects presented serve as a preparation 
for teaching art in the grades and in the high school. The aim 
is to furnish the student not only with material of practical 
nature, 'but also with a background of general artistic knowledge. 

The schedules of study are arranged under the assumption 
that all students shall remain for the full course of two years. 
Others entering irregularly may find it impossible to graduate 
on a shorthand period of residence because of conflicts in required 
work. 







TWO-YEAR 


CURRICULUM 








FALL 






First Year 






Second Year 


1 


Fine Arts 1 




1. 


Fine Arts 9 


2 


Music 1 




2. 


Music 11 


;> 


KriKlish 1 




*» 


Music 14 


4 


Educal ion 1 




4. 


Teaching Music in Training 


5 


.Music 26 






School. 


6 


I'h vs. Tr., elective 


5. 


Rhys. Tr. W 3 





WINTER 




. Fine Arts 2 or 3 


1. 


Elective, Fine Arts 


. Music 1 


2. 


Fine Arts 16 or 17 


. Music 5 


3. 


Music 15 


. Education 2 


4. 


Education 3 


. Music 26 


5. 


Teaching Music in Training 


. Phys. Tr. W 1 


SPRING 


School 


. Fine Arts 6 


1. 


Fine Arts 15 


Fine Arts 5 


2. 


Elective Fine Arts 


, Music 3 


3. 


Music 8 


Music 6 


4. 


Teaching Drawing in 


Music 26 




Training School 


Phys. Tr. W 2 







MUSIC CURRICULA 



87 



All students specializing in Public School Music or taking any 
urse in combination with Public School music must take private 
ssons at the Conservatory in both singing and piano playing 
ruout the two years' residence, unless after examination by 
e Director of the Conservatory they are found skillful enough 
be excused from one of these studies for a part of the time. 

RURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Advisor, Professor Pittman. 
In order that those who desire to teach in the rural schools 
ay be more definitely prepared for their work, courses are 
signed to meet their special needs. While these courses prepare 
pecially for rural service, the certificates qualify the holder to 
ach in the elementary grades of any rural or urban school 
the state. 



88 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR 1500 K 



TWO YEAR CURRICULUM— LIFE CERTIFICATE 

FALL 

First Year Second Year 

Education 1 1 unit Rural Ed. 2 or 6 1 uni 

♦Rural Ed. 1 1 unit English 1 1 uni 

Agriculture 1 - 1 unit (Music 4 1) 

Rural Ed. 3 (Grammar) 1 unit (History 31 1) 

— or 

4 (Teaching 2) 2 unit 

Penmanship — ■ 

Phys. Ti\, elective 4 

Phys. Tr. 6 

WINTER 



Education 2 1 unit 


Education 3 i 


a 




Pine Arts 1 1 unit 


or 






Speech 1 1 unit 


Rural Ed. 7 


(Economics) 


Rural Ed. 4 (Language) 1 unit 






• 1 uni 


— 


Education 4 


or 6 


1 uni 


4 


(Music 4 


1) 




Phys. Tr. W 4 


(History 31 
or 


1) 






(Teaching 


2) 


2 unit; 
4 



Phys. Tr., elective 



♦On approval of the President and the acting head of th< 
department, county normal graduates may take Rural Educatioi 
4 in lieu of this course. 



CURRICULA 



89 



SPRING 

Fine Arts 2, Agri. 5 Rural Ed. 8 (Sociology) 

or 1 unit 

Ind. Art 14 1 unit Physiology 2 or 

Rural Ed. 5 (Arithmetic) Hygiene 1 unit 

1 unit Home Economics 55 
Geography 1 1 unit or 

Nature Study 3 1 unit Industrial Arts 17 



Phys. Tr. W 5 



Geography 3 



1 unit 
1 unit 



Phys. Tr. elective 
Music 4 C 
Handwriting 

1. Practice teaching will be done during the fall- or winter 
erms of the second year. 

2. Students with experience and previous county normal train- 
ng will take Rural Education 6, others will take Rural Educa- 
ion 2. 

3. Men who take this course should take the following Physical 
["raining courses: Ml, M2, M5, M10. 

4. All students who take Rural Education courses are mem- 
ers of the Trailblazer Club and must appear on the program 
t least once each term. 

5. Graduates from county normal schools who are also grad- 
ates from approved high schools are given credit in eight sub- 
sets as follows: Education 1, Rural Education 1, Fine Arts 1, 
'ural Education 3, and four of the following: Speech 1, Music 4, 
fistory 31, Geography 1, Rural Education 4, Rural Education 5, 
'hysiology 2 or Hygiene 1, selection made according to present 
quipment and special interest. 



RURAL SUPERINTENDENTS 

The movement for consolidated schools in Michigan has created 
demand for men to fill the superintendencies of these schools 



90 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

and at the same time teach agriculture. Such men should have 
training in public school organization and administration and 
also a technical course in agriculture. No single institution in 
Michigan furnishes this preparation. 

The Agricultural College offers the training in agriculture and 
the normal schools offer the training in public school adminis- 
tration. To meet the situation the normal schools and the Agri- 
cultural College have adopted a plan of cooperation whereby 
students may pursue a two year curriculum at the normal schools, 
which will combine public school organization and administra- 
tion and rural sociology and the basic courses in agriculture. 
This two years' curriculum will be given two years of credit at 
the Michigan Agricultural College. 

English 1 and 3 2 units 

Mathematics 14 and 15 2 units 

Education 1, 2, 3, and- 16 4 units 

Teachers' Courses 2 units 

Teaching 2 units 



Preferential Agricultural Courses 






Agriculture 2 ( Soils ) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Farm Crops) 1 unit 

Agriculture 4 (Animal Husbandry) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Gardening) 1 unit 

Agriculture 8 (Rural Organization) 1 unit 

Preferential Science Courses 

( Ixmistry 3 and 4 2 units 

Physics 4 and 5 2 units 

Botany l and 5 ; 2 units 



CURRICULA 91 

Desirable Elective Courses 

•Geography 1 Botany 2 

Geology 1 Agriculture 6 

Zoology 4, 6 or 9 Chemistry 7 

Handwriting is required of all students in Agriculture. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

In order to meet the demand for teachers of the various types 
of handicapped children, including the feeble-minded, the deaf, 
the blind, the crippled, the anemic and tubercular children, the 
State Normal College in co-operation with the Detroit Teachers 
College has establisht the Department of Special Education. 
The work of this department is carried on at the Detroit 
Teachers' College in order that advantage might be taken of the 
opportunities for observation and clinical study offered by the 
school system of a large city. Students desiring to specialize 
in this field should enroll at the Detroit center, and all corres- 
pondence with regard thereto should be addrest to Professor 
Charles M. Elliott, Detroit Teachers' College. 

Students enrolled in the college desiring information should 
consult the Registrar. 

See under department of Special Education requirements for 
entrance upon this curriculum. 

Following is a summary of the courses offered: 

Special Education 1 to 14 inclusive 14 units 

Typewriting 1 un j t 

Sociology 1 unit 

Physical Education 1 un it 

Home Economics 1 un it 

ONE YEAR CURRICULUM—LIMITED CERTIFICATES 

Besides the regular work outlined in the preceding pages, 
there are two forms of limited certificates given for partial 
curricula. 



92 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



1. Three Year Certificate Ccrkirullm 

A Three Year Certificate will be given upon the completion 
by high school graduates of fourteen units of work, as specified 
below. This will require one year and one summer term of work. 
The certificate is valid for three years in grades below the tenth. 



List of Subjects 



Education 1, 2, and 3 

Teaching 

Fine Arts 1 or 2 

English 1 

Music 4 

Six teachers' courses 

Mathematics 11 

Geography 1 

English 3 

History 31 

Physiology 2 or 

Hygiene 1 

Speech 1 

Total 



3 units 
2 units 
1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 
6 units 



14 units 



In addition students are required to take: 

1. Physical Training two terms (Phy. Tr. wl and 2 or 4 or 5). 

2. Music 4 c. 

3. Handwriting. 

Students who take out this limited, certificate and who return 
for the life certificate afterwards will be required to complete ten 
units of work for the life certificate. 



2. Ri bal School Certificate Cubbiculum 

This curriculum is designed for students who expect to teach in 
the rural schools. Graduation from an accepted high school is 
required for entrance. Fourteen units of work requiring ait- 
tendance for one year and one summer term are necessary to 



CURRICULA 93 



complete the curriculum. This certificate granted on the com- 
pletion of this curriculum is valid in any school in Michigan for 
three years. 

ONE YEAR CURRICULUM 

FALL TEEM 

Rural Education 1 or Social Science 3 1 unit 

Geography 1 1 unit 

Agriculture 1 1 unit 

Rural Education 3 (Grammar) 1 unit 





4 units 


Handwriting 




Hygiene, 2 hrs. 




WINTER TERM 




Rural Education 2 


1 unit 


Speech 1 


1 unit 


English 1 


1 unit 


Music 4 


1 unit 



Physical Training W4 or Ml 



SPRING TERM 



4 units 



Rural Education 5 or Industrial Arts 17 1 unit 

Rural Education 4 (Language) 1 unit 

Practice Teaching 2 units 



4 units 



Physical Training Wo or M2 

SUMMER TERM 

Rural Education 1 or Social Science 3 1 unit 

Rural Education 5 or Industrial Arts 17 1 unit 

2 units 



04 NOBMAL COLLEGE TEAR BOOK 

1. Rural Education courses are to be taken before the alter- 
nates. All courses offered are required. 

2. All students who take the Rural Education courses are 
members of the Trailblazer Club and must appear on the program 
at least once each term. 

3. Men who take this course should take Physical Training 
courses Ml and M2. 



EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

The State Normal College offers tw T o varieties of non-resident 
work, Correspondence and Extension. 

Extension work was inaugurated by the college at the request 
of certain cities of Michigan and has been in operation for four 
years. The following rules govern correspondence or extension 
courses: 

1. All persons desiring to do correspondence or extension 
work must make application to the Extension Director on 
blanks provided by the college. No credit will 'be given unless 
this requirement has been met. 

2. Students who enter the Normal College having done resi- 
dent w r ork in any of the other normal schools of the state are 
held to a minimum resident requirement of tw T o terms (eight 
units). 

Students who have completed w r ork on our life certificate cur- 
riculum and are working on the degree curriculum are required 
to do at least eight units in residence, the last four of which 
should be done immediately preceding graduation. 

3. Work done by correspondence or extension shall not count 
to reduce the units of resident work required for the several 
certificates or degrees. 

4. All correspondence or extension courses of instruction are 
the equivalent of corresponding courses offered in residence. 

5. Not more than one-fourth of the units yet remaining to be 
done for any certificate or degree may be done by correspondence 
cr extension; for example, a person holding a limited certificate 
and needing ten units for a life certificate may do two by cor- 
respondence or extension; a person holding a life certificate and 



EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE 05 

needing twenty-four units for a degree may do six by corres- 
pondence or extension. 

6. Students may not take more than two extension or two 
correspondence subjects at one time except on approval of the 
committee. 

7. It is expected that a correspondence subject will be com- 
pleted in not less than twelve weeks or more than thirty-six 
weeks from the time it is begun. 

S. Any student taking correspondence work, who has not re- 
ported within ninety days, will forfeit the fee he has paid. There 
will be no refund of fees to students who have partially completed 
a course. 

9. Students doing work in residence will not be permitted to 
carry courses in correspondence except on approval of the com- 
mittee. 

10. Students who are not high school graduates will not be 
permitted to carry extension or correspondence courses without 
permission of the committee. 

11. Any person desiring to do work for credit outside of reg- 
ular class work w T ith a teacher of the institution shall make appli- 
cation to the Extension Committee. 



96 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 



Department Courses 



CHEMISTRY 



Professor B. W. Peet Assistant Professor Byron Corbin 

Mr. Herman Beck 

The class room and laboratories are on the third floor of 
Science Hall. Students specializing in home economics are re- 
quired to take Courses 1, 2, 3, 7, and 11; those specializing in 
physical education, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 7. 

A three-year curriculum combining the Physical and Bio- 
logical Sciences and also the physical and Mathematical Sciences 
is suggested in this catalog in the Physical Science Department. 
Note that Chemistry 3, 4, 5, and 7 are required. 

Students specializing in chemistry should confer with the head 
of the department as early as possible and outline the electives 
that will best meet their peculiar needs. 

Attention is called to the Chemistry Club described in the front 
part of the catalog. 

1. General Chemistry. 1 unit. 

A study of the history, occurrence, preparation, properties 
and uses of the most important non-metals, with their 
principal compounds and of the elementary principles 
underlying chemistry. Lectures, illustrated by experi- 
ments, text-book and laboratory work. The laboratory 
hours to be arranged with the classifier or instructor. 
Pall and Winter terms. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

2. General Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This is a continuation of Chemistry 1. This course 
completes the study of the most common non-metals and 



CHEMISTRY 97 



takes up a brief study of the metals with a few lessons in 
organic chemistry. The additional laboratory hours are 
to be arranged with the classifier or instructor. 
Winter and Spring terms. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

College Chemistry. 1 unit. 

An advanst course in general and inorganic Chemistry. 
The theory and fundamental principles of chemistry are 
emphasized. Follows chemistry 1 and 2 or an approved 
course in a high school. It is a foundation course and 
must precede all other courses in chemistry. The labora- 
tory hours are to be arranged. It may he elected as a 
teacher's course. 
Fall and Spring terms. Professor Peet. 

Qualitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This is largely a laboratory course calling for two hours' 
work daily. The lectures include a study of the theory 
of solution and the laws of chemical equilibrium. The 
laboratory work includes a study of the methods of sep- 
arating and identifying the common metals and acids. 
Constant practice is given in analyzing substances un- 
known to the student. 

Fan and Winter terms. Professor Peet and Assistant 
Professor Corbin. 

Quantitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This is a laboratory course requiring two fours' work 
daily. This class also meets twice a week for quiz and 
instruction. The work is both gravimetric and volumetric 
the gravimetric portion including the determination, in 
simple compounds, of the common metals and acid anhy- 
drides and the volumetric work including the preparation 
of standard solutions, the determination by alkalimetry 
or a few of the common acids and alkalies, and the deter- 
mination of the elements, iron, chlorine and iodine by 
methods of oxidation and reduction. Students get prac- 
tical work in making up solutions for the laboratory 
13 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Winter and Spring terms. Professor Peet and Assistan j 
Professor Corbin. 

Quantitative Analysis. I unit. 

This is a continuation of Chemistry 5. It includes analy 
sis of brass, technical analysis of limestone, and founda 
tion work for analysis of minerals and fertilizers. 
Spring term. Professor Peet. 

Organic Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by one year of high school 
chemistry or its equivalent. An elementary course ii 
general organic chemistry, including both aliphatic am 
aromatic compounds. Special attention is given to com 
pounds having an important relation to household arts i 
physiological chemistry and agriculture. Laboratory hou 
to be arranged. 

Fall and spring terms. Professor Peet and Assistan 
Professor Corbin. 

Organic Preparations. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4 and 1 
Labortory work, 10 hours a week. A number of typica 
organic compounds are prepared. This course is valu 
able in helping to give the student a better 'understanding 
of Chemistry 7 and is one of the best courses in chemistr; 
for teaching the setting up and handling of apparatus. 
Fall or Winter term. Assistant Professor Corbin. 

Food Analysis. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4 or 7. Th 
lectures and recitations twice a week deal with foo 
industries. The laboratory work includes the complet 
analysis of milk and milk products, analysis of cereal' 
sugars, fats and testing for adulteration of foods. 
Spring term. Professor Peet. 



CHEMISTRY UU 

Food Analysis, Advanst. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 9. This is a 
laboratory course calling for two hours' work daily. The 
work varies according to the wants of the students, but 
includes the study of sugars, protein, fats and sanitary 
analysis of water. 
Professor Peet. 

Household Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This course includes a study of the carbohydrates, fats, 
protein, enzymes, the chemistry of digestion, the calori- 
meter, sanitary water, baking powders, beverages, fer- 
ments and preservatives, disinfectants, cleaning agents, 
dyeing, food laws and adulteration of foods. The labora- 
tory work takes up simple tests and properties of carbo- 
hydrates, fats, protein, digestion experiments, analysis of 
milk, a study of textile fibres and adulteration of foods. 
Professor Peet. 

Advanst Qualitative Analysis. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4. It is a 
two-hour laboratory course, recitations twice a week. 
'Some time is given to the separation of metals in the 
presence of phosphates and oxalates, the analysis of alloys 
and the separation of complex mixtures. A more thoro 
study is given to the ionization theory, law of mass action 
and equations of oxidation and reduction than is given in 
Chemistry 4. 
Winter term. Professor Peet. 

Coal and Water Analysis. 1 unit. 

The complete commercial analysis of coal, including the 

determination of the heating value with a calorimeter, is 

offered. The ordinary chemical analysis of water is made 

and the bacterial count. A laboratory course ten hours a 

week. 

Professor Peet and Assistant Professor Corbin. 



100 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

14. Physical Chemistry. 1 unit. 

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 4. A study < 
the laws and theories that relate to the behavior of gase 
liquids and solids; the phase rule; chemical equilibria 
and electro-chemistry. No laboratory work. 
Winter term. Professor Peet. 

16. History of Chemistry. % unit or 1 unit. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 4. Lecture, text and seminal 
hours to be arranged. Two times a week. 
Professor Peet. 



Education 



Professor Charles 0. Hoyt, Chairman. 

Professor Samuel B. Laird Professor Nathan A. Habvi 

Professor Henry C. Lott Professor Horace Z. Wilbur 

Professor Marvin S. Pittman 

Associate Professor Theo. W. H. Irion, Secretary 

Associate Professor Herbert H. Foster 

Associate Professor Orlando O. Norris 

All freshmen pursuing any curriculum are required to tal 
courses 1, 2, and 3 or 3a. 

Students, whose curriculum calls for History of Educatio 
may elect from courses 4, 5, 6, or 32. 

1. Psychology 1. 1 unit. 

A consideration of the fundamental laws of human to 
havior. Topics especially emphasized are instincts, habi 
and the laws of learning. The work is based on a te> 
book, supplemented by readings and reports. 
Fall, winter and spring. Professors Laird, Harvey, Loi 
Irion, Norris, Foster. 



EDUCATION 101 



Psychology 2. 1 unit. 

This course is a continuation of course I and deals prin- 
cipally with Mental Measurement. It includes the read- 
ing with demonstrations, of the Binet Tests, and class 
examination by the Army Mental Tests, Otis Tests, and 
other forms of group intelligence tests, as well as many 
single association tests and measurements. The course 
also includes an examination of the psychological char- 
acteristics of the three periods of infancy, Childhood and 
adolescence, and an application to them of the psycho- 
logical principles learned in course I. It is considered a 
laboratory course, and the basis of the work is class 
experimentation. Required work. 

Fall, winter and spring terms. Professors Laird, Harvey, 
Lott, Irion, Norris. 

Principles of Teaching. 1 unit. 

A study of the principles underlying the teaching process, 
the organizing and motivating of school activities, the 
method of maintaining discipline, the psychological 
factors in teaching, and methods of measuring the results 
of teaching: making the school conform to the community 
ideal, and developing the curriculum in conformity with 
it. Presupposes Education 1 and 2. Offered each term. 
Professors Laird, Harvey, Lott, Irion, Norris and Foster. 

Changing Conceptions in Elementary Method. 

This course deals with the various theories which have 
dominated elementary practice. The 'historical situations 
out of which they arose, the elements which characterized 
them, and the virtues which they possessed will be dis- 
cussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon the dom- 
inate conceptions of method found in the American ele- 
mentary school at present. 
Readings, reports, discussions. 
Professor Pittman. 



102 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

4. History of Modern Education. 1 unit. 

An historical study of the principles of education grow 
ing out of the development of educational and social ideals 
represented by the different educational movements ii 
modern times. The attempt is made to study the meaning 
of accepted principles by tracing them to their sources 
Text: Hoyt, Studies in the History of Modern Education 
•Fall, winter and spring terms. Professors Hoyt anc 
Wilber. 

5. History of Ancient Education. 1 unit. 

An historical study of the educational movements thai 
constitute educational endeavor in the Western Worlc 
down to the beginning of modern times. The course aims 
(1) to work out an intelligible account of the relatioi 
of these successive movements to the contemporary socia 
movements; (2) to follow the evolution of educationa 
content, technic, equipment, new ideals and new theories; 
(3) by comparison and contrast of these elements witl 
present conditions, to arrive at a better appreciation ol 
our own times; and (4) to consider our indebtedness tc 
ancient and medieval endeavors. Lectures, readings anc 
class discussions. Presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Wilber. 

6. History of Education in the United States. 1 unit. 

A consideration of the historical development of educa 
tion in the United States and of the influences affecting 
it. Special attention is given to the growth of the vari 
ous educational agencies, and to state and national organi 
zations. Text: Cubberley, Public Education in the Unitec 
States. Presupposes courses 1, 2, and 3. 
Professors Hoyt, Wilber and Pittman. 

7. Advanst Child Study. 1 unit. 

An experimental laboratory course, dealing 1 wit li tb< 
methods ol' the measurement of mental processes am 
with the yarioufl tests and devices for determining tb< 



EDUCATION 103 



mental capacity of children. Laboratory work, lectures, 
readings. Not open to freshmen; presupposes courses 1, 
2, and 3. 
Spring term. Professor Harvey. 

Psychology of Individual Differences. 1 unit. 

This course is complementary to the courses in general 
psychology and is designed to enable teachers to determine 
the characteristics which constitute the peculiarities of 
individual children. Laboratory work, lectures, readings. 
Not open to freshmen. Professor Harvey. 

Educational Measurement. 1 unit. 

An advanst course, not open to Freshmen. 
In this course, instruction is given in the methods of col- 
lecting, tabulating, and representing educational data. 
The various measures of frequency, distribution, averages, 
relationship, correlation are studied. Constant use is 
made of data collected by using the various scales and 
tests that have been devised for measuring educational 
products. 
Pall term. Professor Harvey. 

Psychology of the Common School Subjects. 1 unit. 

This is an advanst course not open to freshmen, and must 
be preceded hy courses 1, 2, and 3. It is intended to sum- 
mate the work that has been done in experimental peda- 
gogy and in measuring the efficiency of teaching. An 
evaluation is given of the methods of teaching penman- 
ship, spelling, reading, arithmetic and grammar, and an 
examination made of tue various scales and tests for 
determining efficiency in the common school branches. 
Professor Harvey. 

Social Psychology. 1 unit. 

A psychological study of the social life. The course is a 
consideration of the bearings of modern psychology upon 



104 NOKMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

the methods of social evolution and organization. The 
basal traits of the individual serve to explain social 
phenomena. Lectures, reports, discussions. Presupposes 
courses 1, 2., and 3. 
Fall and summer terms. Professor Lott. 

15a. Educational Sociology. 1 unit. 

A development of some of the principles of Social 
Psychology, and the adaption of these principles to edu- 
cational theory and practice. Particular emphasis is 
placed upon group and community activities through 
which the individual is educated. Readings, reports, dis- 
cussions. 
Winter term. Professor Lott. 

16. School Administration. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the problems of school organiza- 
tion and control from the standpoint of the superin- 
tendent. (Consideration is given to the development of 
our school system, its plan, structure, and the laws by 
which controlled. The consolidated school movement, 
its advantages and requirements, receive special atten- 
tion. The course of study, school buildings and equip- 
ment, and the relations between superintendent, teachers 
and boards of education are matters of special study. 
Lectures, readings and class discussions. Presupposes 
courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 (or 5). 
Spring term. Professor Wilber. 

18. The Socialized Curriculum. 1 unit. 

An introductory course in the theory of the formulation 
of a school curriculum that will meet the requirements of 
modern social conditions. Vocational activities are con- 
sidered as projects for social cooperation, and problems 
involved are presented for analysis and solution. Lectures, 
reports, and discussions. 
Spring and summer terms. Professor Lott. 



EDUCATION 105 



Philosophy of Education. 1 unit. 

This course consists of a study of the philosophical bases 
of education and of their relation to the various lines of 
human activity. The different aspects of education are 
considered in the light of their historical development 
and their bearing on the solution of present day problems. 
Assigned readings, reports, and class discussions. Not 
open to freshmen. 
Spring term. Professor Hoyt. 

Introduction to Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of the fundamental problems of philosophy, sup- 
plementing the courses in the history of education and 
furnishing a basis for further philosophical study. Lec- 
tures, readings and class discussions. Not open to fresh- 
men. 
Spring term. Professor Wilber. 

History of Ancient Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of Greek philosophy from Thales to Aristotle. 
The work is based on a textbook, supplemented by lec- 
tures, readings, and class discussions. Not open to 
freshmen. 
Fall term. Professor Wilber. 

History of Medieval Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of the development of philosophy from Aristotle 
to Descartes, with a view to determining the medieval 
sources of modern thought. Textbook, readings, and 
class discussions. Not open to freshmen. 
Winter term. Professor Wilber. 

History of Modern Philosophy. 1 unit. 

A study of the doctrine of the modern philosophers from 
Descartes to Kant, both with regard to their relation to 
each other and their influence on the modern educators. 



106 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Textbook, readings, and class discussions. Not open to 

freshmen. 

Spring term. Professor Wilber. 

26. Ethics. 1 unit. 

A study of the historical development of the principles 
underlying the social and moral human relations, to- 
gether with the application to modern institutional life. 
An elective course for life certificate or degree. 
Winter term. Professor Lott. 

30. American Thought and Education. 1 unit. 

A presentation of the movements and tendencies in Amer- 
ican education, based upon European and American 
thought. This course will offer an excellent prepara- 
tion for a more intelligent understanding of the growing 
problems of education and will pave the way for a criti- 
cism of many educational practices and experiments. 
For advanst students only. 
Spring term. Professor Hoyt. 

31. Special Proolems in Educational Psychology. 1 unit. 

A course intended for advanst students, principals and 
supervisors. An attempt is made to give a practical, 
working knowledge of the subject without going into 
detailed discussions of theories. The work is based in 
part upon text-book discussions, supplemented by lectures 
and reports. Opportunity is offered for carefully super- 
vised investigations and special studies. Not open to 
freshmen. 
Associate Professor Irion. 

32. The Evolution of Educational Theory. 1 unit. 

This is a treatment of the history of education from the 
standpoint of the different educational movements, 
especially in relation to the great movements of civiliza- 
tion. The aim is to discover the causes and effects of the 
changes in educational theory. The course may be elected 



ENGLISH 107 



as required work in education or it may be used as a 
degree subject. 
Professor Hoyt. 

Secondary Education. 1 unit. 

This course will deal with the institutional and instruc- 
tional aspects of the high school, both junior and senior. 
A study will be made of the secondary school as a social 
institution, its organization and activities, and its curricu- 
lum. The methodology of secondary instruction will 
receive special attention. Not open to freshmen. 
Professor Foster. 



ENGLISH 



Professor Florus A. Barbour 
Associate Professor Abigail Pearce 
Associate Professor Alma Blount 
Associate Professor Estelle Downing 
Assistant Professor Estabrook Rankin 
Assistant Professor Elizabeth Carey 
Assistant Professor Mrs. E. M. Folsom 



Freshman Composition. 1 unit. 

This course includes the making of bibliographies; note- 
taking; the outlining of themes; a study of unity, co- 
herence, and emphasis, as applied to the theme, the para- 
graph, and the sentence; the discussion of various methods 
of paragraph development; and a brief study of words for 
the purpose of arousing interest in vocabulary. Constant 
practice in writing is given thruout the course. 
From six to eight sections will be formed during each 
term of the year. 



108 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

2. English Grammar. 1 unit. 

Open only to students specializing in primary work. An 
elementary review of English. Grammar. The course in- 
cludes an analysis of sentences with special reference to 
punctuation, a rapid review of inflections and funda- 
mental constructions, and such a study of grammatical 
usage as the teacher in the primary grades needs special 
training upon. The entire course is more elementary in 
character than course 3. 

3. Teachers' Grammar. 1 unit. 

(a) A rapid academic review of the subject in Whitney's 
Essentials of English Grammar. In connection with 
analysis and composition of sentences attention will be 
given to the common errors in speech and writing which 
teachers in the public schools are most frequently called 
upon to correct. Model lesson plans will also be sug- 
gested for teaching special topics. Required of all stu- 
dents upon the General Course and of all students special- 
izing in English. 

4. Principles of Criticism 1. 1 unit. 

For freshmen specializing in English, either as a major 
or minor. The elementary principles of literary criticism 
are applied to the study of selections from the American 
poets. The main purpose of the course is to introduce 
freshman students to an intelligent study of short poems, 
and as a result of such study to enable them to teach such 
poems more effectively in the different grades of the public 
schools. The course presupposes a high school course in 
English Literature, and is open to all students. 
Sections are formed during each term. 

5. Principles of Criticism 2. 1 unit. 

A study of American prose in accordance with the method 
suggested for course 4, and in all cases to be preceded by 
course 4. The course is deemed especially valuable as M 



ENGLISH 109 

opportunity for studying different types of prose; the es- 
say, narrative and descriptive (Irving); the essay, medi- 
tative and philosophical (Emerson); the short stor? 
(Hawthorne and Poe) ; minute observation (Thoreau) ; 
and the oration in Webster's reply to Hayne. Different 
classics may be chosen from time to time with the same 
general purpose in mind. Supplementing course 4 the 
somewhat intensive study of different types of prose in 
Principles of Criticism 2 is intended to promote more ef- 
fective teaching of prose selections in the different series 
of readers in the elementary grades. At the same time it 
affords a preparation for more advanst courses in English 
for those who are preparing to teach in high schools. 
Winter and spring terms. Professor Barbour, and Associ- 
ate Professor P'earce. 

English Literature. 
A rapid survey of the History of English Literature. Text- 
book study will be supplemented by lectures and such il- 
lustrative reading as there may be time for in a single 
quarter. The main purpose of the course is to review rap- 
idly the development of English Literature, especially from 
the Age of Elizabeth to the close of the Victorian Era. As 
an aid to students in making out high school courses the 
Uniform Entrance Requirements in English will be 
briefly considered as to their suitability for reading as 
representative classics. 

Literature for the Primary Grades. 1 unit. 

The work of this course consists of lectures, required read- 
ing, reports, observation of model lessons, practice in story 
telling and dramatization. Such a detailed study of the 
literature for children is made as gives a basis for the ap- 
preciation, selection, and presentation of the most suitable 
material for the primary grades. Fables, folk-tales, fairy- 
tales, myths, legends, Bible stories, realistic stories, ani- 
mal stories, rhymes, and simple poetry are considered. 



HO NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






This is a required course for sophomores who are special- 
izing in primary work, for those taking the Rural curric- 
ulum, and may be also taken as a degree course after 
conference with Assistant Professor Folsom. English 1 
must precede English 8. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. 

9. Literature for the Intermediate and Grammar Grades. 1 unit 

The work of this course is identical with that of 8 except 
that the literature studied is that suitable for the interme- 
diate and grammar grades. Myths, Bible stories, tales of 
adventure, chivalry, romance, and history, simple narra- 
tive and lyric poetry, are read and discust with reference 
to their literary qualities, their fitness for various grades, 
and the best methods for their presentation. This course 
is required of sophomores upon the General Curriculum 
who are making English their major or minor elective, 
and may also receive degree credit. English 1 must pre- 
cede English 9. 
Spring term. Assistant Professor Folsom. 

10. English Fiction. 1 unit. 

A short course of lectures upon (1) the history of English 
fiction and the development of the modern novel; (2) upon 
the plot, its qualities, and technical construction. Special 
study of different types will follow, particular attention 
being paid to plot, setting, and character sketching. The 
aim is to make this course helpful and suggestive not only 
to high school teachers but also to any teachers of narra- 
tive prose. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Pearce. 

11. Advanst Rhetoric 1. Description and Narration. 1 unit. 

A study of models, discussion of principles and practice in 
writing. Supplementary reading thruout the course. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Downing. 



ENGLISH 111 



Advanst Rhetoric 2. Exposition and Alignment. 1 unit. 
Same general plan as in English 11 with work in note- 
taking and outlining, and a little practice in oral theme- 
making. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Downing. 
Note — English courses 11 and 12 are planned primarily to 
meet the needs of students specializing in English, but oth- 
ers who are qualified to do the work are eligible. Both 
courses presuppose a knowledge of the elementary prin- 
ciples of rhetoric and the ability to write with a fair de- 
gree of clearness and accuracy. Either course may be tak- 
en without the other, and the sequence is not important. 
The models are secured from various sources. Either 
course may be made to count on a degree. 

Teachers' Composition. 1 unit. 

This aims to fit students for teaching composition in the 
grammar grades and high school. It includes a study of 
theme-subjects, methods of making assignments, criticism 
and rating of papers, oral composition, picture work, voca- 
tional English, correlation and cooperation, course of 
study, text-books, and other matters vital to effective com- 
position work. It is carried on by outside reading, discus- 
sions, observation of composition classes, and the making 
of model lessons. Special students of English and all others 
who have done satisfactory work in Freshman Composi- 
tion are eligible to the course. The work is credited as a 
teachers' course and will be offered one hour each term. 
Associate Professor Downing. 

I Anglo-Saxon. 1 unit. 

Cook's First Book of Old English, followed by a study of 
the history of the English Language. The course is an 
elementary study of linguistic principles from a historical 
point of view, with special reference to the application of 
such a method to forms, constructions, and idioms of the 
English language. The course is especially recommended 



112 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

to students who expect to teach English grammar in high 
schools. Because of the close relation between English 
and other Germanic languages it is interesting and useful 
to students and teachers of German. As an elementary- 
course in the methods of historical study it is valuable al- 
so to special students of the Classics. Associate Professor 
Blount. 

15. Nineteenth Century Poetry. 1 unit. 

A study of nineteenth century poetry, with special consid- 
eration of Shelly, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Morris, and 
Swineburne. Winter term. Associate Professor Blount. 

16. Shakespeare. 1 unit. 

A brief course of lectures on the technical construction of 
the drama, followed by an analytical study of Hamlet, Mac- 
beth, and King Lear. Special attention is given to the de- 
velopment of the plot, and to the consistency of the charac- 
ters with the plot. Teachers of literature in high schools 
will find the course stimulating and suggestive as a prep- 
aration for teaching Shakespeare. The course should not 
be taken by first year students, nor by those not specializ- 
ing in English except by conference with Professor Bar- 
bour. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Barbour. 

17. English Masterpieces. 1 unit. 

Six weeks of the quarter are given to the study of Words- 
worth. Minor poems are given special study while the Pre- 
lude and the Excursion are discussed in lectures and thru 
assigned reading. The remainder of the quarter is de- 
voted to Carlyle's Sartor Resartus. Students who have 
had courses in Philosophy and the Bible will find the Mas- 
terpiece study above outlined an inspiring corroboration 
of the fundamental teaching of Biblical Literature. 
Spring term. Professor Barbour. 



ENGLISH 113 

IS. Contemporary Drama. 1 unit. 

This course will comprise: (1) a study of some 19th cen- 
tury dramatists — Ibsen, in English translation, Shaw, Pi- 
nero, Yeats, Jones, and others; (2) characteristics and ten- 
dencies of the present drama; (3) modern drama and so- 
cial problems. 
Associate Professor Pearce. 

19. Middle English. 1 unit. 

A study of the literature of England from the Norman Con- 
quest to the Renaissance. Particular attention will be 
given to the Fourteenth Century and to the pronuncia- 
tion of Chaucer. The library is well supplied with texts 
and translations from the literature of the entire period. 
Associate Professor Blount. 

20. The Bible in the Making. 1 unit. 

This course covers the history of the Bible from its sources 
in ancient lore, oral and written, through the history of the 
oldest manuscripts, to the completion of the Old Testament 
and its translation into Greek. The New Testament is 
taken up in a similar way giving the historical develop- 
ment of the Epistles and the Gospels. The course in- 
cludes the history of the most important codices and the 
chief modern versions of the Bible. 
Associate Professor Pearce. 

21. The Short Story. 1 unit. 

A study <of the history and technique of the modern short- 
story. This course will call for some library work, the 
reading of many stories, and the analysis and criticism 
of a limited number representing distinct types. There 
will be one or two critical papers. 
Associate Professor Downing. 

23. Advanst Composition. 1 unit. 

This course will be based upon a study of the English 
15 



114 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



familiar essay. It will include a study of the 17th cen- 
tury essay, beginning with the Montaigne and Bacon; of 
the periodical essay of the 18th century; of the essay of 
the 19th century as it was developed by Damb, Carlyle, 
Newman, Emerson, Ruskin, etc; and a brief study of con- 
temporary essayists. It will be carried on by lectures, 
reading, and class discussions. A weekly theme based 
upon some aspect of the work of the preceding work will 
be expected. Only students who are well grounded in the 
simple fundamentals of composition should elect it. 
Associate Professor Downing. 

24. Shakespearean Comedy. 1 unit. 

This course follows English 16. At least four of the come- 
dies will be read in class,— Midsummer Night's Dream, As 
You Like It, Twelfth Night, and The Tempest. 
The effective teaching of Shakespeare calls for an appre- 
ciation of his rhythm. With this in mind a short course 
of lectures upon versification will precede the reading of 
the plays and time will be taken in class, by oral read- 
ing, to catch the spirit of the comedies, and to cultivate 
a sensitive feeling for the music of Shakespeare's verse. 



25. Literary Projects for the Grades. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to meet the present-day demand on 
the part of superintendents, principals, and teachers in the 
primary, intermediate and junior high school departments, 
for practice in treating large literary units as projects. 
Such story groups as the following will be studied as to 
(a) content (b) division into units for teaching, (c) adap- 
tion for, and (d) presentation in, the various grades: 1 
Hiawatha (background of Indian myth and Indian life) ; 
2. Sigurd the Volsung (background of Norse myth, Norse 
life, the Vikings; 3. Kalevala (background of Finland 
and the frozen North); 4. Iliad and Odyssey (back- 
ground of Greek myths); 5. William Tell (Switzerland 
and Life on the Alps); 6. Robin Hood (days of ballad- 
making, and King Richard's England); 7. The Gid (Spa- 



FINE ARTS 115 



nish background); 8. Story of Roland; 9. Arthurian 
Cycle; 10. Faery Queen (background of medieval life, 
knighthood, chivalry) 11. Cuchulain (Celtic Cycle) ; 12. 
Hebrew Cycle (background of pastoral life in East). 
Bibliographies will be made by students. English 1 is 
presupposed and English 8 or 9 is highly desirable as 
preparation for this course. 



FINE ARTS 



Professor Bertha Goodison. 

Associate Professor Lida Clark. 

Miss Lota H. Garner. Miss Helen Finch. 

2. Perspective. 1 unit. 

Instruction is given in the principles of perspective and 
of light and shade. Drawings are made from type forms, 
still-life, interiors and exteriors of buildings. 
Mediums: Pencil, brush and ink, blackboard. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Miss Garner, Associate 
Professor Clark, Miss Finch. 

2. Nature Drawing. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

This course includes the pictorial and decorative treat- 
ment of plant and animal forms in black and white, and 
color. Mediums; Pencil, water colors, blackboard. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Professor Goodison, Miss 
Garner, Associate Professor Clark. 

3. Commercial Design. 1 unit. 

The work in this course is the study of composition and 
design in black and white and color, including lettering. 
Such commercial problems as posters, magazine covers, 
advertisements, trade marks, labels, etc. are given. 
Mediums: Pencil, ink, water color, and crayon. 



116 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Fall, winter and spring terms. 

Professor Goodison, Associate Professor Clark, Miss 

Finch. 

5. Teachers' Drawing, 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

Preparation is given for teaching art in the grades. Pro- 
gressive series of lessons in the different art subjects are 
planned and executed. The following is considered: art 
in relation to other subjects, to enviroment, industry, etc., 
also various methods of presenting lessons. 
Fall and spring terms. Professor Goodison. 

6. Still-life Drawing and Painting. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2 or 3. 

Instruction is given in the rendering of drapery, objects, 
still-life and flowers in charcoal and water color. Some 
problems in landscape composition are introduced. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Clark. 

7. Blackboard Drawing. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

Offered summer term only. 

Rapid sketching on the blackboard in outline or in 

values of flowers, animals, landscapes and buildings. The 

aim is to give the teacher skill in illustrating lessons in 

geography, history, nature study, etc. 

Miss Garner. 

8. Composition. 1 unit 

Prerequisites: Three courses in Fine Arts or their equi- 
valents. 

The work will be somewhat advanst in character, as 
studies suitable for illustration or mural decoration will 
be made. These will require the use of figures, animals, 
and landscapes, and will be executed in black and white 
and in color. 
Summer term only. Miss Finch. 



FINE ARTS 117 



9. Design. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2, or 3. 

An appreciation of the principles of design in line, mass, 

and color. Exercises with brush and ink, charcoal, water 

colors and oils. Application made with wood blocks, 

stencils and other mediums. 

Fall and spring terms — One section, 2 hours. Miss Finch. 

10. Home Economics Design. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

The course in H. E. Design is planned to cover the deco- 
rative part of the sewing taught in the grades and in the 
high school. The theory of flower arrangement and table 
decoration also receive attention. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Clark. 

11. Interior Decoration. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

This course instruction in the principles of color and de- 
sign as related to problems of home decoration and fur- 
nishing. Such factors controlling house planning and fur- 
nishing as the lighting, size and function of rooms, and 
the adaptability and cost of materials are considered. 
Spring term. Professor Goodison. 

12. Costume Design. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

The course in costume design includes sketching from 
the lay figure, and the designing of the modern costume 
based on the fundamental principles of design. The exer- 
cises are carried out thru various mediums: pencil, pen 
and ink and water color. Special attention is given to 
color combinations and to technique in the rendering of 
materials. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Clark. 



118 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

15 and 15a. Life Sketching. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Courses 1, 2 and 6. 

This class is held two hours daily, four days in the 

week. The course includes rapid sketching for action and 

proportion, and the rendering of the full figure and the 

head in light and shade. The mediums used are charcoal, 

chalk and pen and ink. 

Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Clark. 

16. History of Architecture and Sculpture. 1 unit. 

This course is the study of the architecture and sculpture 
of the Egyptian, Grecian, Roman, Romanesque, Byzantine 
and Renaissance periods. 
Fall or winter term. Associate Professor Clark. 

17. History of Painting. 1 unit. 

This course includes a series of illustrated talks on the 
principal painters of different periods and countries. 
Special emphasis on modern painters. 
Spring term. Professor Goodison. 

18. Greek Art and Archaeology for Beginners. 

This course is open not only to classical students but also 
to students of art. The work is popular in character and 
aims to give, in a simple manner, such information in an- 
cient art and architecture as every intelligent teacher 
should have. The course will be given by lectures and il- 
lustrated by the stereopticon. 
Spring term. 



GEOGRAPHY 119 



Geography 



Professor Mark Jefferson 
Miss Margaret Sill 



The work of the department is designed to train teachers for 
the public schools of the state rather than specialists in Geog- 
raphy, tho a number of the leaders in American Geography have 
been trained at Ypsilanti. 

The course named Geography 1, Teachers' Geography, will be 
found to be a very strong one. It is planned to correct widespread 
errors of matter and method and to lay a sound foundation for 
good work in common school geography teaching. Teachers of 
experience will find it especially helpful, for it is not in any sense 
a review of school geography. It is work of collegiate grade and 
goes into fundamentals. It should precede all other courses for 
those who take several and will contribute usefully to general cul- 
ture if taken alone. 

Students are not encouraged to specialize in Geography unless 
they have unusual aptitude and capacity, ibut a moderate number 
will find opportunity in the advanced courses here listed, and some 
work recommended by the department in the languages, mathe- 
matics, drawing, physics and geology. Most of the advanst 
courses deal with countries in Europe or South America where 
Professor Jefferson has lived and travelled, and where he has made 
the pictures from which our lantern slides are taken. This is true 
also of many parts of the United States. 

List of courses and dates. Starred courses to be arranged for 

1. Teachers' Geography, each term. 

2. Field Geography, each spring, 2 hrs. 

3. United States, winter 1922, 1924. 

4. Europe, Fall 1922, 1924. 



120 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



5. Commercial Geography, each term. 

6. Physiography of Lands, Fall 1921. 

7. Map Drawing. * 

8. Prance, spring 1924. 

9. Meteorology. * 

10. Latin America, winter 1923. 

11. The Balkans. * 

12. United Kingdom, spring 1923. 

13. Mediterranean Lands, spring 1922. 

14. Scandinavia. * 

15. Central Europe. * 

16. (Switzerland, fall 1923. 

17. The New World, winter 1922. 

H. High school geography, each term. 

L. Laboratory preparation of maps and material by instructor. 



1922— 



1923 — 



1924- 





WINTER 


SPRING 


FALL 


Assistant 


5, 5, 1,H 


5, 1, 1,H 


5,5, 1,H 


Mr. Jefferson 


3, 1, 1, 17 


1, 2, 13 


1, 1, 4,L 


Assistant 


5, 1, 1, H 


5, 1, 1, H 


5, 5, 1, H 


Mr. Jefferson 


1, 1, 10, L 


1,2,12 


1,1, 16, L 


Assistant 


5, 1,1, H 


5, 1, 1,H 


5, 5, 1,H 


Mr. Jefferson 


1,1, 3, L 


1,2,8 


1, 1, 4,L 



Details of Courses 

Note. — Geography 1 is the fundamental course in the depart- 
ment and required of all students on the Grammar Grade and 
Intermediate Curricula. Other courses in geography should be 
preceded by this. 



1. Teachers' Course. 1 unit. 

Countries are regarded as groups of men under one gov- 
ernment together with the portion of the earth they have 
in actual use. The distribution of men over the earth is 
regarded as the most important item of geography, and 



GEOGRAPHY 121 



modern conceptions of such things as cities and countries 
are here explained. Climate figures a good deal in the 
course, especially in so far as the explanation of rainfall 
is concerned, for the distribution of rainfall over the earth 
enables man to live and thrive best in favored localities. 
The old-time teaching about the climates of the earth, for 
instance, has the merit of simplicity, but it is often the 
simplicity of ignorance, teaching what simply is not so, as 
that the equatorial regions are excessively hot, that Eu- 
rope is given a mild climate by the -Gulf Stream, and that 
winds are cooled by snow-capped mountains. Of recent 
years abundant measurements and careful observations 
enable us to describe climates with some accuracy, and 
illustrate the chief principles that control them. Enough 
exercises are given in simple map drawing to enable the 
students to use maps better. It is believed this course 
gives a sound foundation both for elementary teaching 
and for further study of geography. 

2. Field Work. Teachers' Course. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

A course in Physiography for students who are able to do 
some walking. Others should be content with 6. More 
than half the exercises are conducted in the open air. 
Spring term, 2-4. Students must reserve the whole after- 
noon, as occasional excursions will last till 6 p. m. This is 
most important work for all who wish to teach geography 
well, since it deals with geography itself, not descriptions 
of it. It is the real laboratory work of geography. 

3. Geography of The United States. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

4. Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 

Prerequisite, Course 1. 

A study of culture, power, commerce and physical habitat 

of the chief European nations, with comparisons between 

them. 



122 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

5. Commercial Geography. 1 unit. 

This course treats of the geographic control on the produc- 
tion and exchange of such commodities as cotton, wheat, 
iron, copper, wool and manufactured articles, to develop 
the principles underlying and guiding commercial acti- 
vities. Smith's Commerce & Industry and Jefferson's Atlas 
of Commercial Values. 

6. Physiography of the Lands. 1 unit. 

Preparation for teaching Physical Geography in high 
schools. This is an advanst course in physical geography, 
dealing with the forms of the surface of the lands and the 
process by which they take and change these forms. 
Davis' Physical Geography and Practical Exercises are 
used as texts. 

7. Map Drawing. 1 unit. 

Exercises on the theory and practice of drawing maps. 

8. Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 

Intensive study of France. Georgraphy 4 must precede 
this course. 

9. Meteorology. 1 unit. 

A study of weather and climate with especial attention to 
observation and explanation of the current and usual 
weather at Ypsilanti. Davis' Meteorology as text. 

10. Advanst Course on the Geography of Latin America. 1 unit. 

Intensive study of the countries south of the United 
SI ales. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

l .». Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 

Intensive study of the United Kingdom of Great, Britain 
and [reland. Geography 1 must precede this course. 



HISTORY 123 



Aclvanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 
Intensive studies of Mediterranean countries. Geography 
4 must precede this course. 

Advanst Course on the Geography of Europe. 1 unit. 

Intensive study of Switzerland. Geography 4 must pre- 
cede this course. 

The New World. 

The geographical aspects of the new countries of Europe 
and the new relations arising from the World War settle- 
ments, in Europe and out. Dr. Bowman's book, the New 
World will be used as text. Dr. Bowman is a former stu- 
dent and teacher in the department. 



HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 



Proffessor Carl E. Pray. 

Associate Proffesor Mary B. Putnam. 

Associate Proffesor Bertha G. Buexx. 

Associate Professor Bessie Leach Priddy. 

Courses 10, 11 and 20 should be elected early in the 
course by specializing students, unless English History has 
not been taken in the high school, when courses 1 and 2 
should be elected instead of 10 and 11. 



HISTORY 

History of England. 1 unit. 

This course is for high school graduates who have not 
included English history in their courses. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Buell. 



124 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

2. History of Engla?id. 1 unit. 

This course is a continuation of course 1. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Buell. 

5. History of the British Empire in the Ninteenth Century. 
1 unit. 

A study in the development of democracy, in the expan- 
sion of empire, and in the British solution of imperial 
problems. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Buell. 

10. History of Greece to the Conquest by the Romans. 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned reading. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

11. History of Rome. 1 unit. 

Supplementary to Course 10. Courses 10 and 11 should be 
taken in the order named. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

12. History of Greece and Rome. 1 unit. 

For students intending to teach in intermediate grades. 

20. History of Medieval Europe. 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned library reading. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Buell, Professor D'Ooge. 

21. History of Modern Europe from 1500 to 1189. 1 unit. 

Text-book with assigned library reading. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Buell. 

22. History of Nineteenth Century Europe. 1 unit. 

This course continues the general survey of European his- 
lory offered in Courses 10, 11 20 and 21. It begins with 
\}\o French Revolution and affords discussion of the im- 
portant political and social changes of the early part of 



HISTORY 125 

the Nineteenth Century. Text-book supplemented by 

library reading. 

Winter term. Associate Professor Buell. 

The World War. 1 unit. 

The place of the World War as a struggle for trade 
supremacy, its background of diplomatic bargain and in- 
trigue in relation to expansion and balance of power and 
the dramatic conflicts caused by aspirations for national 
unities will be developed. The period emphasized will lie 
between the Congress of Berlin (1878) and the present. 
Attention will be given to the effects of the struggle on 
American history, on the development of international 
law and on the progress toward democracy. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 

History for the Primary Grades. 1 unit. 

Required of all students of the Primary Curriculum. This 
course is designed especially to aid the teacher in the 
grades in the use of elementary historical material and 
draws from both European and American history and 
social conditions. Discussions of social relations in 
family, school and community; research with written ex- 
position; and the consideration of a tentative course of 
study in social relations for the primary grades consti- 
tute the bulk of the work. 
Given each term. Associate Professor Buell. 

Teachers' History. 1 unit. 

Required of all students of the General Curriculum and 
all those specializing in History. 

This course begins w T ith the close of the American Revo- 
lution and continues thru the War of 1812. A text-book, 
with reference work, lectures on history and methods, 
observation work in the grades and discussions, consti- 
tute the course. 
Given each term. Professor Pray. 



126 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

31a. Teachers' History for Junior High School. 1 unit. 

A course on the teaching of history and civics in the 
Junior High School. Attention will be given to courses 
of study, collateral reading and selection of text-books. 
History 31 is a prerequisite. 

31. Advanst American History 1. 1 unit. 

Teachers' history or an equivalent is a prerequisite for this 
course. It covers the period from the close of the War of 
1812 to the end of Jackson's Administration. 
Each term. Professor Pray. 

33. Advanst American History 2- 1 unit. 

This course covers the period from the close of Jackson's 
Administration thru the Civil War. 
Spring term. Professor Pray. 

34. Advanst American History 3. 1 unit. 

Course 34 covers the period from 1865 to the present time. 
Fall term. Professor Pray. 

35. American Colonial Institutions. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Professor Pray. 

36. American Colonial History. 1 unit. 

For students intending to teach in the intermediate 
grades. 

38. Industrial History. 1 unit. 

A text-book course in American Industrial History. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

39. Current History. 1 unit. 

A study of present day questions, political, economic, phil- 
anthropic, etc. Written and oral reports. 
Each term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

41. History of American Diplomacy. 1 unit. 
Spring term. Professor Pray. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 127 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



Sociology. 1 unit. 

This course discusses the theories of sociology. It em- 
phasizes the bearing of sociological theory on education 
and shows how historical knowledge is illumined by an 
analysis of the evolution of society. Text-book, assigned 
readings, discussions oral reports and the preparation of 
a thesis. 
Fall and winter terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 

Sociology 2- 1 unit. 

Course 2 is a study of practical sociology wherein modern 
problems and prevailing remedical efforts are inspected. 
Original investigation with properly compiled reports 
thereon forms a part of the course. A text-book, maga- 
zines of social exploration and social surveys are the 
materials on which class room discussions and reports 
are based. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Priddy. 

Political Science. 1 unit. 

This takes the place of the course previously called Teach- 
ers' Civics and counts for a Teachers' Course for spe- 
cializing students. It presupposes high school courses in 
American history and government. The elements of Polit- 
ical Science, certain present questions in government and 
some specially difficult points in our own government are 
studied. The course aims to prepare students for good 
citizenship and to aid them in their future work in train- 
ing young citizens. 
Give each term. Associate Professor Putnam. 



128 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

4. Comparative Government. 1 unit. 

Special study is made of the English, French and German 
governments. Some one or two other governments of 
special interest at the time are taken up each year. The 
course in Political Science should precede this course. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

5. Economics 1. 1 unit. 

Elementary course in Economics. Text-book and assigned 

reading. 

Given each term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

6. Economics 2. 1 unit. 

Presupposes Economics 1 of which it is a continuation. 
Attempts to apply some of the principles of economics to 
the study of present questions. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

7. Present Reconstruction Problems. 1 unit. 

A study of economic, political and social questions before 
us at the present time, with the object of obtaining a bet- 
ter understanding of problems and proposed solutions. 
Work will be done by class discussions and special reports 
by students and occasional lectures by the instructor. 
Such study seems of special interest to teachers who are 
in part responsible for clear thinking and just action on 
the part o fthe American people. The course might be 
called a course in mental and moral "preparedness." 
Winter term. Associate Professor Putnam. 

8. Social Composition and Organization. 1 unit. 

An inquiry into the developments of class, caste and polit- 
ical party, with special attention to the labor movement 
as a world problem. Ideals of social service and social 
justice in the reconstruction program. Social Science 1 
and 2 not required as a prerequisite, 



HOME ECONOMICS 129 

DEGREE COURSES 

tudents desiring third and fourth year work may select from 
rses 5, 21, 22, 24, 32, 33, 34, 35, 39, and 41 in history and any 
;he courses in the Social Sciences. 

reshmen are not admitted to courses 21, 22, 34, 35 and 41 in 
ory, and courses 1, 2, 5, and 6 in the social sciences. 



HOME ECONOMICS 



Professor Jessie E. Richardson. 

Assistant Professor Florence Lytle. 

Assistant Professor Faith E. Kiddoo. 

Assistant Professor Bliss Maple. 

Miss Sara Murray — Cafeteria Manager. 

See pages 73, for an outline of Home Economics Curriculum. 

Foods and Cookery. 1 unit. 
Lectures and laboratory work. 

A study of foods in relation to source, compositions, char- 
acteristics, nutritive value, digestion, effect of heat and 
moisture at different temperatures, cost, and place in the 
daily diet. The laboratory work deals with the prepara- 
tion of beverages fruits, vegetables, cereals, flour mixtures, 
candies, eggs, milk, cheese dishes, meats, salads and 
desserts. Special emphasis is placed upon speed, accuracy 
and skill in manipulation and the recognition of standard 
products. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Fall term. Freshman year. 

Fpod Economics. 1 unit. 

Lectures and laboratory work. 

Presents a study of the nutritive value of foods in rela- 
17 



130 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

tion to body requirements and costs; the making of dieta- 
ries; the preparation of breakfasts, luncheons, and din- 
ners, using simple home service and also more formal 
methods, their cost bearing a definite relation to the family 
budget. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Winter term. Freshman year. 

3. Garment Making. 1 unit. 

This course includes practice in the following: the use of 
commercial patterns; the care and use of the sewing 
machine and its attachments; hand and machine sewing 
applied to simple garments; the repair of clothing; the 
elementary study of textile fibres and fabrics, and the 
hygiene and economics of clothing. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 
Spring term. Freshman year. 

4. Dressmaking. 1 unit. 

This course includes further practice in the use and adap- 
tation of commercial patterns in garment construction; 
the planning and making of a wash dress, a silk waist; the 
renovation and remodeling of a woolen dress or skirt. 
Hygience and economics of clothing are studied prepar- 
atory to budget making in later courses. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 3. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00 
Fall term. Sophomore year. 

5. Nutrition. 1 unit. 

Lecture, laboratory and discussion. 

This course will include the study of the food require- 
ments of the normal individual thruout infancy, childhood, 
adolescence, adult life, and old age. The chemistry and 
physiology of digestion, the energy value of food, the 
nutritive value of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, ash 
constituents, and vitamines are studied. Practice is 



HOME ECONOMICS 131 



given in planning dietaries for each normal period of 

life and also dietaries for groups of people and families 

under diverse conditions. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1 and 2. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Winter term. Sophomore year. 

6. Clothing Sociology and Tailoring. 

This course aims to give practical training in the applica- 
tion to costume of line, color harmony, light and shade, 
and texture. It will aid the student in planning, execut- 
ing and choosing garments from the standpoint of art. 
Practice is given in using and adapting to different indi- 
viduals and purposes designs from current fashion maga- 
zines. 
Materials used — pencil, ink and water colors. 

Tailoring. 

Demonstration lectures are given in methods used by tail- 
ors. Each student makes a coat suit in linen or other 
suitable material. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 3 and 4. 
Spring term. Sophomore year. 

7. Home Nursing. 1 unit. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
methods for rendering first aid, and for caring for patients 
in the home where trained assistance is not possible or 
not necesary. General practice is given in the care of a 
sick room, bed-making, bathing a patient, bandaging, etc. 
Diets are studied and menus planned. The bathing and 
general care of an infant is also given attention. This 
course is credited by the Red Cross, and certified. 
Offered every term. 

8. Lunch Room Management. 1 unit. 

This offers an opportunity to do work in large quantity 
cookery. One hundred Training School children are 



132 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



served with hot noon-day lunches which are prepared and 
served within a specified time and at a definite cost. The 
food requirements of school children are emphasized. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 
Winter term. Junior year. 

9. Houseivifery arid Laundry. 1 unit. 

Discussion and laboratory. 
Housewifery is a practical course that aims to acquaint the 
student with the most effective methods as applied to 
housekeeping. It shows how to reduce tasks in the home 
and how to save time, money, and energy. Each student 
plans, draws and routes a home. Household labor-saving 
appliances are studied; repairing and renovating are done; 
household budgets are considered, and the homemaker's 
job is analyzed. 
Laundry. The principles and processes in laundry work 
are studied. The chemistry underlying the use of soap, 
water, bluings and various reagents is considered. Equip- 
ment, cost, care and routing of the laundry; removal of 
stains and disinfecting are emphasized. Household and 
commercial laundries are visited. The practical work in- 
cludes the washing and ironing of cottons, woolens, silks 
and linens. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Spring term. Junior year. 

10. Child Care and Child Welfare. 1 unit. 

A comprehensive study of childhood; its problems with 
regard to food, clothing, health, environment, home and 
school. Aims to suggest possible methods for those teach- 
ing in public schools in presenting all the important phases 
in child development. 
Spring term. Sophomore year. 



11. Household Management. 1 unit. 

A group of six or eight young women live in the Ellen 



HOME ECONOMICS 133 



Richards house for the purpose of doing practical home- 
making under supervision. This is required of all seniors, 
and is opened to no others in the department. Each per- 
son pays for room and board, and earns, by living in the 
house, a credit which helps to satisfy the demand of the 
iSmith-Hughes law that its teachers shall have had ex- 
perience in home-making. 
Offered each term. Senior year. 

Home Economics Methods. 1 unit. 

This course aims to make better teachers. It analyzes 
the subject matter of home economics on the basis of the 
principles of teaching and presents the problems of the 
teacher, such as the preparing of courses of study, the les- 
son plan, the organization and equipment of a department, 
the relation of home economics to other subjects in the 
curriculum and to community work. 
Spring term. Junior year. 

Experimental Cookery. 1 unit. 
Discussion and laboratory work. 

This course gives the student the principles of research 
work in the field of cookery thru quantitative experiments 
with various problems. The class selects a problem, and 
each student works on this individually, thus checking the 
results obtained by other members of the class, and aiding 
in establishing a conclusion scientifically correct. 
Each student has an opportunity also to work on a food 
problem which she selects because of its peculiar interest 
to her. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Spring term. Senior year. 

Dietetics. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the application of the principles of 
human nutrition to the feeding problems of the individual 



134 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



and the group under conditions of health and of such dis- 
eases as are dependent upon dietetic treatment. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 5, and 10. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Fall term. Senior year. 

16. Cafeteria Management. 1 unit. 

This course is planned for the purpose of preparing stu- 
dents to organize and administer the business of the school 
cafeteria or lunch room. Actual planning for and prepar- 
ing of the counter display and the serving of the foods re- 
quire five laboratory periods each week and in addition, 
two periods weekly are devoted to discussion and lecture 
work. 

17. Home Economics Teaching. 2 units. 

Each student teaches home economics subjects in grade 
and high school classes for two terms or an equivalent 
number of hours. This gives an opportunity for trying out 
work developt in Home Economics 12, and also aids in fa- 
miliarizing the students with schoolroom management. 
Open to senior students only. 
Any term. Senior year. 

18. Textiles. 1 unit. 

The primitive forms of industry in their relation to the 
textile industries of today form a basis for the study of 
the production and manufacture of fabrics used in the 
home. Cotton, wool, silk, linen and other useful fibres are 
investigated. Physical and chemical tests for the identifi- 
cation of the fibres are given, and their individual proper- 
ties studied. 
Laboratory fee, 1.00. 
Fall term. Junior year. 
Prerequisites: High school chemistry or its equivalent. 



HOME ECONOMICS 135 



Dress Design. 1 unit. 

Practical course in dressmaking. 

This includes the application of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of costume design to the different types of personal- 
ities; the modeling and making of lingerie and silk 
dresses; costs and suitability of materials to individuals 
and purposes will be discussed. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 3, 4, 6, and 18. 
Winter term. Third year. 

Millinery. 1 unit. 

Including the making of patterns for hats from paper, the 
making of wire frames, stretching buckram and cape-net 
frames, and remodeling commercial frames. Frames are 
covered with braid, and other materials, as desired, and 
trimmed. Decorative materials such as bows, fancies and 
flowers are made, and old materials are renovated. The 
student makes a new hat, and remodels an old one. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 3, 4, and 6. 
Winter term. Senior year. 

History of Costume. 1 unit. 

A study of Egyptian, Grecian and Roman costumes and 
their bearing upon later French dress, showing how our 
modern attire is an outgrowth of these and how many of 
the changes in fashion today are based on fancies of hun- 
dreds of years ago. 
Spring term. Senior year. 

\ Home Economics Design. 
See Fine Arts 10. 

Costume Design. 
See Fine Arts 12. 



136 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

24. Home Decoration. 

See Fine Arts 11. 

25. Home Economics in the Part Time School. 1 unit. 

A study of the aim, organization and administration of 
part time schools and classes, and what home economics 
has to offer in their curricula. Types of subject matter 
to be presented and its relation to types of students found 
in part time schools will be discust, and practical work de- 
velops Special qualifications which teachers in these 
classes should have will be outlined, and methods for pro- 
gress suggested. 

30. Home Economics Survey. 1 unit. 

This course aims to present the development and growth of 
the Home Economics Movement and its present status as ' 
affected by legislation, and by the larger field of work now 
possible to women. 
The work of the teacher, homemaker, and professional 
woman will be analyzed and the value of a study of Home 
Economics as related to their tasks will be shown. 
Winter term. Senior year. 

50. Planning and Serving of Meals. 1 unit. 

This is a combination course which differs from the regu- 
lar year's work and may be taken as an elective by stu- 
dents who are not specializing in this department. 
Discussion of the simple home service and of the morei 
formal methods for serving foods. 
The meals are planned with special reference to nutritive 
value and cost. 
Laboratory fee, $2,00. 
Summer term. 



;».). 



Home Economics for Special Students. 1 unit. 

Not open to students specializing in Home Economics. 

A course which aims to aid (hose teaching in rural schools, 



HOME ECONOMICS 137 



or in special rooms, to provide some training in food and 

clothing for their children. Half the class periods will he 

given to food study and half to the study of clothing. 

Will require a two-hour period, as laboratory work will be 

done. 

Laboratory fee, 2.00. 

6. Home Economics for Special Students. 1 unit. 

A continuation of the above course carried thru a second 

term. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics &5. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

0. Shirtwaist Course. 1 unit. 

This is a combination course which differs from the regu- 
lar year's work and may be taken as an elective by students 
who are not specializing in this department. 
Designing and making of simple underwear, skirts, shirt- 
waists and dresses. Commercial patterns are used. The 
course aims to give practical aid to students wishing to 
make plain clothing. 
Summer term. 

Students in the Clothing classes require no uniforms, but are 
xpected to wear dresses appropriate for the school room. A small 
ewing apron of white material and of plain design is worn in 
lass. Sewing boxes and equipment may be purchast under the 
lirection of the Department; approximate cost of equipment, 
17.00 for the course. The cost of materials for articles required in 
he course varies with the student's selection, which is subject to 
he supervision of the instructor. 

Students in the Pood and Cookery classes will require uniforms 
o consist of white shirt waist, which may be brought from home; 
in apron, and holder, which should be purchased under the super- 
vision of the department. Approximate cost of uniform, $5.00. 



138 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



Assistant Professor Alice I. Boardman. 
Miss Mary E. Hatton. Miss Belle Morriso? 

For full required Industrial Arts Curriculum, see page 83. 

For the combined curriculum in Fine Arts and Industrial ArU 
see Fine Arts department. 

A fee of one dollar will be charged each term to cover expense 
of material used. 

1. Woodwork 1. 1 unit. 

This course aims to teach elementary principles of joinery 
thru nature study and projects developt in the fifth and 
sixth grades. 
Fall term. 

2. Woodwork 2. 1 unit. 

Problems involving duplicating of parts, broad surface 
planing, square joints and wood fastenings. These prin- 
ciples are practically worked out in projects which will be 
of interest to boys of the seventh grade. 
Discussions on subjects related to wood work, as compari- 
son and treatment of different woods, care and construc- 
tion of tools, development of industrial education. 
Spring term. 

3. Woodwork 3. 1 unit. 

Problems requiring decoration, as carving, inlaying and 

staining; gouging and wood modeling, lapt, glued, mortise 

and tenon joints. 

Lathe work. 

Study of sources and treatment of materials. 

Identification of trees and woods. 

Fall term. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 139 



4. Woodwork 4. 1 unit. 

Problems requiring hard wood and more difficult joints; 
designing and finishing simple furniture; developing or- 
iginal projects. 

Outlining courses and estimating expense of installing 
equipment. 
Lathe work. 
Winter term. 

5. Woodwork 5. 1 unit. 

In this course a piece of furniture is designed, constructed 
and suitably finished, the requisite plans having pre- 
viously been made in Course 7. Some attention is given 
to the history and development of "Period Furniture." 
Wood staining and finishing. 
Lathe work. 
Spring term. 

6. Woodwork 6. 1 unit. 

Those who do not care to take Industrial Arts 17 may sub- 
stitute one unit of advanst wood work; furniture making, 
house construction and advanst joinery. 
Spring term. 

7. Mechanical Drawing. 1 unit. 

This course includes simple perspective, orothographic 
projection, working and isometric drawings, detail and as- 
sembly drawings; some of the common conventions found 
in commercial practice and elementary furniture design 
principles; free hand sketching from objects. Special em- 
phasis is placed on lettering and some attention is given 
to outlining courses in mechanical drawing for high school 
students. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Morrison. 



140 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

8. Mechanical Drawing. 1 unit. 

Industrial Arts 7 should precede 8. 

This course includes advanst problems based on the events 
of the previous course. Special attention is given to the 
conventions used in commercial drawing room practice, 
in mechanical, sheet metal, and architectural drawing. 
Spring term. Miss Morrison. 

14. Elementary Handicraft. 1 unit. 

This course aims to meet the needs of teachers in rural 
and ungraded schools, kindergarten and primary depart- 
ments, and exceptional children. The nature of the course 
will be flexible enough to meet the requirements of the 
class. Many problems considered would be helpful to lead- 
ers of camp fire and social groups and summer camps. 
Problems requiring simple tool work will be developt, bas- 
ed on nature and farm projects. Special attention will be 
given to the designing and making of toys. 
Administration Building. Room 4. Miss Boardman. 

15. Arts and Crafts. 1 unit. 

Pottery, both hand j built and cast, with application of de- 
sign, glazing and firing. Simple processes in jewelry mak- 
ing. An elementary course in these crafts requiring Fine 
Arts 9 or its equivalent as a prerequisite. 
Silver and stones must be purchased by the student. Fee 
of $1.00. Spring and summer terms. 
Training School Building. Room 0. Miss Hatton. 

16. Industrial Handwork. 1 unit. 

Course 17 or its equivalent is a prerequisite. 
The purpose of this course is to give the student a knowl- 
edge of the projects and materials suitable for children in 
the primary grades. Problems are developt in elementary 
bookbinding including repairing and rebinding of books, 
in chair caning, and in the utilization of numerous ma- 
terials in basketry. Considerable emphasis is given to the 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 141 

outlining of courses and the history of some of our colon- 
ial industries as related to the industries of the present. 
Administration Building. Room 4. Miss Boardman. 

L7„ Supplementary Handwork. 1 unit. 

This course is especially planned to meet the needs of pri- 
mary teachers. It deals with the problems which concern 
man's use of raw materials in providing food, clothing, 
shelter, etc. Projects in clay, paper, cardboard, and tex- 
tiles are given, as well as others related to the various sub- 
jects of the grades and the observance of holidays. Study 
of industrial processes and methods of teaching form an 
important part of the course. A fee of $1.00 is required. 
Training School Building. Room C. Miss Hatton. 

L9. Jeivelry 

Instruction will be given in the making of brooches, pen- 
dants, chains, etc. The setting of stones, saw-piercing, re- 
pousse, enameling, casting, soldering, and finishing pro- 
cesses, will be taught. Industrial Arts 15 and Pine Arts 9, 
or its equivalent, is required. 

The cost of silver and stones must be met by the student. 
The fee of $1.00' covers use of equipment and cost of inci- 
dental materials. 
Training School Building. Room C. Miss Hatton. 

20. Pottery. 1 unit. 

More advanst work in coiled and built shapes and slipcast- 
ing. Incised, relief, inlaid, and glazed decorating. The 
composition of glazes and operation of a kiln are taught. 
Fine Arts 9 (Design) and Industrial Arts 15 are prere- 
quisites. A fee of $1.00 is required. 

Laboratory hour additional. Training School Building. 
Room C. Miss Hatton. 



142 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY 

1. Kindergarten-Primary Education. 1 unit. 

The aim of Kindergarten-Primary Education 1, is to give 
the student a thoro understanding of the dominant charac- 
teristics, experiences, and needs of the child from four to 
eight years of age, and the environmental conditions best 
adapted to complete development. It will include the 
theory of play materials and play activities, character- 
istic of these ages. Supervised observation in the kinder- 
garten and primary grades will be made with particular 
reference to individual characteristics and differences, in- 
terests and responses to various stimuli. 
Miss Adams, Miss Watson, Miss Paine. 

2. Kindergarten-Primary Education. 1 unit. 

Kindergarten-Primary Education 2 will be a continuation 
of Kindergarten-Primary Education 1. It will be devoted 
to a study of the subject matter best suited to children 
from four to eight years of age. Emphasis will be laid on 
the subject matter, theory and method best suited in pre- 
senting this material to the children of kindergarten age. 
Supervised observation of type lessons will be made with 
particular reference to the evaluation and organization of 
activities in kindergarten and primary grades. 
Miss Adams, Miss Watson, Miss Paine. 



LATIN 143 



LATIN 



Professor Benjamin L. D'Ooge. 

Associate Professor Orland 0. Norris. 

Assistant Professor Clara Janet Allison 

: Beginners, Latin. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

[ Beginners' Latin. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

2 Beginners' Latin. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

Courses 1-3 are preparatory to all that follow, and are ' 
credited as follows: 

(a) iStudents who have had no Latin may begin it 
here, and their work will be credited on the electives of 
their Normal Course. 

(b) Students Who have taken the first year of Latin 
in addition to the high school work required for entrance 
will receive no advanst credits for the same unless it be 
followed by a second year here. 

Students who wish to specialize in Latin are urged to 
take as much as possible before coming to this institu- 
tion. 

4 Second Year Latin and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

5 Caesar and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Assistant Professor Allison. 



144 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

6. Caesar and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

7. Cicero and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

8. Cicero and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

9. Ovid, Metam.orphoses. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Assistant Professor Allison. 

10. Ovid, Metamorphoses. 1 unit. 

Pall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

11. Vergil, Aeneid. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

12. Vergil, Aeneid. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Norris. 

13. Livy and Latin Composition. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Associate Professor Norris. 

14. Cicero's Be Amicitia and Be Senectute. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Associate Professor Norris. 

15. Latin Selections and Roman Literature. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Associate Professor Norris. 

16. Horace, Satires and Epistles. 1 unit. 

Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

17. Horace, Odes. 1 unit. 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 



LATIN 145 

18. Latin Comedy and Roman Private Life. 1 unit. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

19. Latin Writing 1. 1 unit. 

This course is open to such only as have had at least four 
years of the language. It is designed to meet the needs of 
those who look forward to teaching Latin, and combines 
drill in the translation of connected English into idiomatic 
Latin with a thoro review of syntax. 
Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

20. Latin Sight Reading. (2 recitations per week, V2 unit.) 

This course is open to such only as have had at least three 
years of Latin. It affords systematic drill in the building 
of a vocabulary, and in the principles underlying the struc- 
ture of the Latin sentence, so that the pecularities of 
order may become thoroly familiar and progress in 
reading be easier and more rapid. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

21. Teachers'' Course in Caesar, Cicero and Vergil. 1 unit. 

This course is required of all who expect to teach Latin 
and is open to such only as have had at least five years of 
the language. The lectures present: (1) a brief history of 
the Latin language and its relation to other languages; 
(2) the justification of Latin in the secondary school; (3) 
problems and methods of teaching secondary Latin; (4) 
pronunciation, quantity, prosody; (5) a general bibliog- 
raphy and a consideration of the best text-books; (6) 
ancient books and the general principles of textual criti- 
cism. Students who are specializing may take this 
course as one of the required teachers' courses. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

22. Historical Latin Grammar. (2 recitations per week V2 unit. 

Course 22 is open only to those who have had at least five 
years of Latin. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 
19 



146 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

23. Latin Writing 2. (2 recitations per week, y 2 unit.) 

Course 23 is an advanst course and presupposes a credit 
in Latin Writing 1. While the latter has most to do with 
matters of syntax, the former is devoted to a study of 
style and diction. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge, 

24. Latin Inscriptions. (2 recitations per week, Y2 unit.) 

Course 24 is an advanst course, is conducted as a seminar, 

and is open only to ten students; it may be elected only 

by such as obtain special permission from the head of the 

department. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

25. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations. 1 unit. 

The hour for this class will be determined at the time the 

class is organized. 

Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

26. Roman Political Institutions. 1 unit. 

This course should be taken by all who are specializing in 
Latin and History. It should be preceded by a course in 
Roman History. 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

27. Teachers' Review of Latin Grammar. 1 unit. 

This course should be taken by all who expect to teach 
Latin, and will be counted as one of the six required 
teachers' courses. 
Fall term. Professor D'Ooge. 

COURSE IN GREEK ART 

28. Greek Art and Archaeology for Beginners. 1 unit. 

This course is open not only to classical and art students 
but also to students on the general curriculum. The work 
is popular in character and aims to give, in a simple 



LATIN 147 

manner, such information in ancient art and architecture 
as every intelligent teacher should have. The course will 
be given by lectures and illustrated by the stereopticon. 
Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

ANCIENT TRAGEDY FOR ENGLISH READERS 

}0. Greek Drama in English, 1 unit. 

This is a course intended to present by direct study of 
English translations the essential features of the classical 
backgrounds of modern drama, especially tragedy. The 
primary emphasis of the course will be literary — regard 
for the dramatic possibilities in the local legends that fur- 
nisht the materials of Greek tragedy, for the progress of 
literary skill with which dramatic possibilities were rea- 
lized in structure and technique, and for differences be- 
tween ancient and modern tragedy. The study will be 
illuminated by a concise historical sketch of the Greek 
drama and theater; the Roman drama and theater; and 
the transmission of the Greek and Roman dramatic tradi- 
tions down to their arrival in England. Several of the 
tragedies will be read — some in class, and others outside. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Norris. 

1. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. 1 unit. 

The hours for this class will be determined at the time the 

class is organized. 

Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 

2. Catullus, Tilulus, and Propertius. 1 unit. 

The hours for this class will be determined at the time 

the class is organized. 

Spring term. Professor D'Ooge. 

3. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. (2 lectures 

per week. y 2 unit.) 
Winter term. Professor D'Ooge. 



148 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

COURSE IN MYTHOLOGY 

1. Mythology. 1 unit. 

Who would not like to know the old Greek myths and re- 
ligious beliefs, and how they originated and developt. The 
course in Mythology is open not only to students of the 
Latin department, but is specially designed to acquaint 
the non-classical student with the general field of classical 
mythology and the psychology underlying it. The poet's 
and artist's selection and use of the classis myths are 
made the basis of selection for study. Attention is given to 
the interpretation of mythological allusions in literature, 
and some 700 mounted pictures are displayed illustrating 
the artists' use of the myths. Abundant illustration of the 
principles of story-telling is given, with the myths as 
subject matter. Text-book, supplemented by illustrative 
materials and interpretations. 
Each term. Associate Professor Norris. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

Students preparing themselves for teaching Latin are given 
unusual advantages for practice teaching in the seventh, eight, 
ninth, and tenth grades of the Training Department under the 
supervision of a trained specialist. 

LIBRARY AND ILLUSTRATIVE MATERIAL 

The department has a well-equipt classical library of more than 
a thousand volumes, representing standard authorities in English, 
French and German. Large accessions to this collection are being 
made year by year, and the facilities of this nature are ample for 
all our purposes of study and investigation. Strong emphasis is 
laid upon collateral reading in connection with all classical 
authors. The department is also well supplied with maps, charts, 
lantern slides, and photographs, of which constant use is made. 



MATHEMATICS 149 



MATHEMATICS 



Professoe Elmer A. Lyman 

Associate Professor R. A. Wells. 

Associate Professor Ada A. Norton 

Associate Professor Jane Matteson 

Assistant Inez Selesky 

Preparatory Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

A comprehensive review in the fundamental parts of Arith- 
metic. The aim of this course is to secure rapidity and 
accuracy in computing. 
Pall and winter terms. Associate Professor Norton. 

Albegra 1. 1 unit. 

Elementary algebra thru the fundamental operations. 
Fall and spring terms. Miss Selesky. 

Algebra 2. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Algebra 1 including factoring and frac- 
tions. 
Fall and winter terms. Miss Selesky. 

Algebra 3. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Algebra 1 and 2 to simultaneous equa- 
tions. 
Winter and spring terms. Miss Selesky. 

Algebra 4. 1 unit. 

This includes near quadratic simultaneous equations. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor Matteson. 



150 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



6. Algebra 5. 1 unit. 

Completes high school algebra and furnishes a complete re- 
view of elementary algebra. Associate Professor Matteson. 

7. Plane Geometry 1. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in plane geometry including rectilin- 
ear figures. 

Fall, spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Mat- 
teson and Miss Selesky. 

8. Plane Geometry 2, 1 unit. 

A continuation of Course 6. 

Fall, winter and summer terms. Associate Professor Mat- 
teson and Miss Selesky. 

9. Plane Geometry 3. 1 unit. 

Associate Professor Matteson. 

10. Solid Geometry. 1 unit. 

Associate Professor Matteson. 

11. Teachers 1 Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

This course is carried on partly by lectures en the history 
and teaching of the subject, and partly by a review of the 
typical parts of the subject. This course must be preceded 
by all of the high school courses given above. 
Offered each term. Professor Lyman, Associate Professor 
Wells, Associate Professor Norton. 

12. Methods in Geometry. 1 unit. 

A review of plane and solid geometry. Special attention 
will be paid to the methods and presentation of the sub- 
ject. 
Winter, spring and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 

L3. History of Mathematics. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to show the student how the sub- 



MATHEMATICS 151 



jects he is to teach have developt. Students have access to 
the large collection of books in the library. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Norton. 

14. Trigonometry. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in plane and spherical Trigonom- 
etry. Presupposes all high school courses. 
Each term. Associate Professor Wells and Associate Pro- 
fessor Matteson. 

15. Higher Algebra 1. 1 unit. 

Besides giving a more comprehensive view of elementary 
Algebra than could be given in Courses 2, 3, 4, 5, a compre- 
hensive study is made of the idea of a function, the remain- 
der theorem, symmetry, variation, the progressions, deter- 
minants and the graph. Presupposes all the high school 
courses. 

Each term. Associate Professor Wells, Associate Profes- 
sor Norton. 

16. Higher Algebra 2. 1 unit. 

An advanst college course, including additional work on 

the theory of the equation. 

Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor Wells. 

L7. Analytical Geometry. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in analytical geometry. Presupposes 
all the previous courses except 10, 11, and 12. 
Pall and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 

IS. Differential Calculus. 1 unit. 
Presupposes Course 17. 
Winter term. Professor Lyman. 

19. Integral Calculus. 1 unit. 
Presupposes Course 18. 
Spring term. Professor Lyman. 



152 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

20. Theory of Equations. 1 unit. 

This course presupposes Courses 14, 15, and 16. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Wells. 

21. Solid Analytical Geometry. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in solid analytical geometry. Pre- 
supposes all the above courses except 11, 12, 13, and 20. 
Professor Lyman. 

22. Differential Equations. 1 unit. 

Professor Lyman. 

23. Theoretical Mechanics. 1 unit. 

Professor Lyman. 

24. Mathematical Reading. 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Professor Lyman. 

25. Surveying. 1 unit. 

Spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Wells. 

26. Studies in Mathematical Education. 1 unit. 

It is the object of this course to consider a study of the 
teaching of mathematics from an historical and psycholo- 
gical point of view. 
Spring and summer terms. Associate Professor Matteson. 

27. The Mathematical Theory of Investment. 1 unit. 

This course presupposes a good working knowledge of al- 
gebra. The application of the fundamental principles of 
mathematics to the treatment of interest and its bearing 
on the business of Banking Institutions, Building and Loan 
Associations, Sinking Funds, Bond Investments, Life An- 
nuities, Insurance, etc., will be considered. 
Winter, spring and summer terms. Professor Lyman. 



MATHEMATICS 153 



28. Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. 1 unit. 

An elementary course including a brief consideration of 
graphical representations, frequency curves, averages, 
measures of dispersion, and the coefficient of correlation 
with special reference to educational statistics. This course 
presupposes a thoro knowledge of Algebra. 
Assistant Professor Matteson. 

29. The Teaching of Elementary Mathematics. V2 unit. 

Course 11 must precede this course. 

This course is devoted mainly to the teaching of arithme- 
tic. The following topics are considered: Aim of arithme- 
tic teaching; the history of methods in arithmetic; the re- 
sults of scientific studies of problems in the teaching of 
arithmetic; the theory and use of various tests and meas- 
urements in arithmetic; the course of study; methods of 
presenting various topics, etc. 
Associate Professor Wells. 

For those desiring three years of work combining 
mathematical and physical sciences, the following courses 
are suggested: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, 20 and 25 Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4 

English 1 German or French, 2 yrs. 

Geography 2 Teaching 

Physics 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10 Mathematics 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 

Astronomy 1 17, 18, 19, and 25 

DEGREE COURSES 

Mathematics 1-10 will not be credited on the work of the third 
or fourth college year. 

Students who are specializing in this department may elect 
Courses 20 to 27 inclusive for the third or fourth college year. 

Students who are not specializing in this department may elect 
from Courses 12-27 inclusive for college work. 

The course in Mathematical Reading (24), is distinctively a 
fourth year course. 



154 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



Professor Richard Clyde Ford. 

Associate Professor Johanna Alpermann. 

Assistant Professor Florence Lyon. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The library of the department comprises about 1,000 volumes, 
besides a number of the leading pedagogical and literary journals 
of both languages, which are on file in the reading room of the 
College. 

From time to time thruout the year informal lectures are 
given to students of the department on subjects relating to the 
politics, geography, history and literary life of modern Europe. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

Students of the department will have opportunity to do their 
teaching in the classes of the High School, in the seventh and 
eighth grades of the Training School, and frequently in some 
beginning College class. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

In 1905 a gift of ithe Hon. Peter White, of Marquette, now de- 
ceast, made it possible for the department to award $25 annually 
for five years to some student of merit in French. The sum first 
became available in 1905, and was awarded to Miss Elizabeth 
Beal Steere, of Ann Arbor. In 1906 the scholarship was divided 
between Miss Vida Billings and her sister, Miss Daisy Billings; in 
1907 it was awarded to Miss Jean McKay; in 1908 to Miss Claribel 
Glass and Miss Nelle Warwick; in 1909 no award; 1910 to Miss 
Josephine Sherzer and Miss Fanny B. Berry. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 155 

'\>r five years (from 1911) the fund is continued as a memo- 
rl scholarship by Mr. White's heirs. In 1911, 1912, there was no 
alard; in 1913 the scholarship was divided between Miss Ruth 
"Vlliams and Miss Crystal TVorner; in 1914 it was awarded to 
hfafl Ernestine Burton; in 1915 to Miss Mildred Jessup and Mr. 
fcrold Rieder; in 1916 and 1917 no award. Since 1918 awards 
he been resumed. 

DEGREE COURSES 

'andidates for a degree, and specializing in this department, 
Ky elect courses French — 4 to 14; German — 10 to 21; Spanish — 
for the third or fourth college year. 

'andidates not specializing, may elect anywhere according to 
nuirements of their preparation. 

GN'ERAL COURSES— 

muss European Literature 1, 2, 3. 

Three half courses. 1 Russia. 2 Scandinavia and Central 
Europe. 3 France and Spain. 

These courses which are altogether in English are open to 
students of all departments. The courses are frequently 
varried in order and arrangement, but one may be expected 
from the department each year. 

MDERX language teachers course— 

(J)D. Lang. 42.) 

A course devoted to the history, theory and pedagogy of 
modern languages teaching. Review of phonetics. 
Spring term. Miss Alperman. 



156 NOKMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



FRENCH 



FIRST YEAR: — For Beginners. 3 units. 

1, 2, 3. A beginning course in the language, running thruout thj 
year; several sections. Professor Ford, Miss Alpermai 
Miss Lyon. 

In this year particular attention is paid to pronunciatio 
and the elementary principles of grammer and colloquh 
expression. Two hundred pages of matter are read, chose \ 
from such texts as Smith and Greenleaf's French Reade 
Bruno's he Tour de la France, Halevy's L'Abbe Constants 
Be Tocqueville's Voyage en Amerique. 

SECOND YEAR:— 3 units. 

4, 5, 6. Review of grammar, written work and conversation 
thruout the year. 

The reading of this year is taken from such texts as Dij 
mas' L' Evasion du due de Beaufort, Merrinael's Goloml 
About's Le Roi des Montagnes, easy plays, etc., suppl 
mented with sight reading from modern writers, and ou 
side matter in English. 



SENIOR COURSES— 

7. First 125 pages of Duval's Historic de la Littcraturc fra 

caisc; Moliere's Les \Fem,mes 8avantes; Corneille's Pt 

yeucte; Racine's Esther. 

Fall 'term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

8. Duval's Jfistoirc, etc. Pages 125-246. Letters of Madame (h 

Sevigne; Voltaire's Prose. Winter term. Professor Foij 
1 unit. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 157 

Duval's Histoirc dc la Littcraturc Francaisc concluded. La- 
martine's Scenes de la Revolution Francaise; Hugo's Her- 
nani; Hugo's Les Miserables ; Musset's Comedies. 
Spring term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 
The year's work as outlined in the preceding courses in 
planned to give the student a systematic review of French 
literature since the 16th century. The main periods and 
authors are carefully outlined and studied, and the literary 
currents setting into the subsequent centuries are followed 
up. 

11, (42). 3 units. 

These courses are designed to bring together in the de- 
partment all senior students who wish to qualify in any 
way to teach French. The work as planned in 10 and 11 
will include a review of French grammar, with attention 
to historical origins, a supplementary drill in formal com- 
position, and practice in spoken French. In the spring 
term the class merges naturally into French 42 which is 
devoted to the history, theory, and pedagogy (phonetics) 
of Modern Language teaching. Frequently courses 10 and 
11 will alternate with the work designated in French 7, 
8, 9. 

13. 1 unit. 

Courses in scientific French. Two hours a week. 
Winter and spring terms. 



SPANISH 



|)uring the last five years Spanish has achieved a prominent 
>|ce in our schools and colleges. This growth of interest is due 
ijpart to the growth of trade with Latin-American countries, 
ough which has come a demand for interpreters, salesmen and 
r ernment officials with a knowledge of Spanish; in part to the 



158 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

development of industries in Spanish-speaking countries which 
furnish opportunities to civil, electrical and mining engineers 
And then again, the 50,000,000 Latin-Americans are beginning tc 
develop a literature of great interest. The literature of Spain it 
self contains many of the world's masterpieces in poetry and 
drama. Concerning the Spanish novel William Dean Howells 
says: "Take the instance of a solidified nationality, take th( 
Spanish and you have first-class modern fiction, easily surpassing 
the fiction of any of the people of our time." 

The importance of instruction in Spanish has so rapidly gainet 
wide recognition that the demand for teachers exceeds the supply 
The field is an attractive one for prospective language teachers. 
1, 2, 3. 3 units . 

A beginning course in the language, running thruout th< 

year. Pronunciation, grammar, reading, enlivened by com 

position and conversation. 

From 200-300 pages are read from such text as Hill' 

Spanish Tales, Alarcon's Novelas Cortas, Valera's E 

Pajaro Verde, and Spanish-American readers and news 

papers. 

Two sections. Miss Lyon. 



Advanced Spanish 

4, 5, 6. 3 units. 

Review of grammer, written work and conversation. 

The reading of this year is selected from Spanish-America 
books and magazines, and Spanish novels and dramas of the 19t 
century. These texts are typical: Tres Gonuedias Modernai 
Alarcon's El Capitan Veneno, Galdo's Marianela Dona PerfecU 
etc., etc. These courses in advanst Spanish cover two or thre 
years of work. 
Miss Lyon. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 159 



GERMAN 



FIRST YEAR:— For Beginners. 3 units. 

1, 2, 3, This is a course for beginners in the language and runs 
thruout the year. 

The work of this year is intended to give the student a 
good pronunciation and make him acquainted with the 
elements of the grammar and colloquial expression. 
(Grammar, — Thomas, or some beginning books.) The 
amount of matter read will approximate 250 pages and 
will be chosen from beginning readers and easy stories. 

The work is preparatory and treated as follows: 
Beginning work thruout one year, if taken in addition to 
the high school work required for entrance, will be cred- 
ited ONLY WHEN FOLLOWED BY AN ADDITIONAL 
YEAR HERE. 

4, 5, 6. The work extends thruout the year. 

In this year the student is introduced to real literature as 
such, and a constant endeavor is made to cultivate a lit- 
erary appreciation of the authors studied. At the same 
time work in grammar and composition is reviewed and 
emphasized in order to fix thoroly in the learner's mind 
the structural features of the language. 
The following texts may be regarded as typical: Seidel's 
Lebercht Huhnchen, Thiergen's Am Deutschen Herde, 
Chamisso's Peter Schlemihl. 

SENIOR COURSES— 

Study of representative prose; composition and review of 
grammar. Fall term. 1 unit. 



160 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

8. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell; Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea; 

written work. Winter term. 1 unit. 

9. Lyrics and ballads. Outline history of German literature. 

Spring term. 1 unit. 

The work in these courses is a continuation, both in spirit 
and treatment of the preceding. Conversation is encour- 
aged and there is a systematic review of grammar; never- 
theless the chief emphasis of instruction is laid upon ex- 
tensive reading, with an attempt to determine some of the 

main currents in German literature. 

• 

Literature of the xix Century 

10. Study of fiction based on such examples as Scheffel's Ekke- 

hard; Sudermann's Fran Sorge; Frenssen's Jorn Uhl; 
prose composition. Fall term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 

11. Study of modern drama — Sudermann, Hauptmann, Wilden- 

bruch; prose composition. Winter term. Professor Ford, 
1 unit. 

12. Poetry of the 19th century. Spring term. Professor Ford, 

1 unit. 

13. German literature of the last twenty-five years. — Investiga- 

tion of the main currents of the literature of the present 
day. Magazines and special authors. This course will al- 
ternate with Course 12 as a seminar course. 1 unit. 
A suitable Litteraturgeschichte will be used as an outline 
in the work of this year, illustrated by texts, which will 
be studied in class. Each student will also be expected to 
make himself familiar with some special author whom he 
will read and report upon. 

SEMINAR COURSES- 
CLASSICAL Literature. 

14. Study of Le&sing; history of German literature from the 

time of Luther. Fall term. Professor Ford. 1 unit. 



MUSIC 161 

15. Goethe; German literature continued. Winter term. Pro- 
fessor Ford. 1 unit. 

1G. Schiller and his plays; research work and outside reading. 
Spring term. Professor Ford. 

Historical Development of Language and Literature 

17, 18, 19. 3 units. 

A study of the development of the language and grammar. 
Fall and Winter, devoted to Middle High German; Spring, 
the period from 1300 to 1800, 10-11. Professor Ford. 
A systematic review of the History of German literature 
from the beginning to the present time. Selections from 
writers, ancient and modern. This course will frequently 
replace 14, 15, 16. 

20, 21. Scientific German. 1 unit. 

A course of two hours a week thruout the Winter and 
Spring terms, open to students of science, who have had 
the regular preparation of High School German. This 
course will alternate with Scientific French (French 13, 
14). Professor Ford. 



MUSIC 



Professor Frederick Alexander. 

Assistant Professor Clyde E. Foster 

Assistant Professor Carl Lindegren 

Miss Ellatheda Spofford. 

Miss Greta Forte Miss Madge Quigley 

For outline of special curriculum in Music see page 85. 

1. Elements of Music 1. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors of Music in Public Schools. The course 
discusses the development of musical theory, elements of 
21 



162 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

notation, ear training and phrase writing, time sub-divi- 
sions, scale and interval singing, and sight reading. 
Fall term. Miss Porte. 

2. Elements of Musie 2. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors. Must be preceded by Music 1. Ad- 
vanst forms of melody and rhythm, chromatics, minors, 
modulations and part-singing in combination with work of 
the preceding course. 
Winter term. Miss Forte. 

3. Advanst Sight Reading. 1 unit. 

For Supervisors. Must be proceded by Music 1 and 2. The 
course aims to develop fluency and rapidity in music 
reading of the various voices in different clefs. Advanst 
part-singing as a preparation for chorus conducting, in- 
terpretation and analysis. 
Spring term. Miss Forte. 

4. Elements of Musie. 1 unit. 

This course is required for all college students who are 
preparing to teach in grades below the high school. It 
must be followed, however, by Music 4c, reciting two times 
per week for one term, for which no credit is given. 
The course prepares the grade teacher to give music in- 
struction in the various grades and offers practical work in 
sight reading. Methods of presenting music are empha- 
sized in Course 4c. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Quigley, Miss Spofford 

5. Primary Music Methods. 1 unit. 

It aims to consider the subject of primary music teaching 
under the following topics with emphasis upon suggestive 
methods of presentation; child voice— its protection and 
development; training of monotones; rote songs and how 
to teach them; the observation song — its purpose; melodic 
and rhythmic development; notation through the song; 



music 163 

music reading. A sequence of songs for the year, corre- 
lated with the seasons, is memorized. Some ability in pi- 
ano playing is required as an aid in development of rhythm 
For college students who have past Music 4, all terms. For 
supervisors, winter term only. Assistant Professor Fos- 
ter and Miss Forte. 

Grammar Music Methods. 1 unit. 

Supervisors only. A continuation of Music 5 and must 
be preceded by it. The work includes tone production and 
voice development in grammar grades; song interpreta- 
tion; advanst work in melody and rhythm with emphasis 
upon the basic principles involved. 
Spring term. Assistant Professor Foster. 

Grammar Music Methods. 1 unit. 

For college students who have past Music 4 and 4c, or an 
equivalent. Work similar to Music 6. 
Summer term only. Assistant Professor Foster. 

Methods in High School Music and Conducting. 1 unit. 
Devoted largely to theory and professional work for ad- 
vanst or high school grades. It is a continuation of Music 
5 and 6 which must precede it. 
Spring term. Professor Alexander. 

). Department Teaching. 2 units. 

Required in Public School Music and Music Drawing 
courses. Teaching done under Assistant Professor Fos- 
ter's supervision. 

L3. History and Literature of Music. 3 units. 

A course giving an outline of music and musicians, wilth a 
course of reading relating to musical literature. Text-book 
History of Music by Waldo Selden Pratt. 
Fall, Winter, and spring terms. Professor Alexander. 



164 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Ear Training. 

The first two years of Ear Training alternate with Har- 
mony and the third year with Musical Composition and 
must be taken to receive full credit in these subjects. 
First year (covered by Music 14-16) : The recognition and 
writing of all major and minor intervals; the augmented , 
fourth and diminisht fifth; the recognition and writing of 
all triads and the dominant-seventh chord with inversions. 
Second year: Harmonic dictation including all triads, 
incomplete dominant-seventh and ninth and some second- 
ary seventh chords with inversions. Modulation. Third 
year: Recognition of all diatonic and chromatic intervals, 
altered and mixt chords in both major and minor modes. 

14. Harmony 1 and Ear Training la. 1 unit. 

Major and minor scales; intervals. Principal triads in 
major and minor modes, and connecting of same. 
Fall and summer terms. Miss Quigley. 

15. Harmony 2 and Ear Training lb. 1 unit. 

Subordinate triads in major and minor modes. Inversions. 
Five — seven with inversions and resolutions and practical 
use of these chords. 
Winter term. Miss Quigley. 

16. Harmony 3 and Ear Training lc 1 unit. 

All other seventh chords. Five — nine and incomplete five 
— seven and five — nine. Diminisht seventh in minor. 
Spring term. Miss Quigley. 

17. Harmony 4 and Ear Training 2a. 1 unit. 

Direct modulations. Altered and mixt chords in major 

and minor modes. 

Fall term. Miss Quigley. 

18. Harmony 5 and Ear Training 2b. 1 unit. 

Extraneous modulation. Special treatment of diminisht 



music 165 

and dominant seventh chords in both modes. Inharmonic 

tones. 

Winter term. Miss Quigley. 

Harmonise and Ear Training 2c 1 unit. 

Inharmonic tone continued. Harmonization of embelisht 
melodies and figured basses. Analysis. 
Spring term. Miss Quigley. 

.usical Composition. 

Form and analysis with original work. This course re- 
quires one year's work and comprises the following: The 
simple phrase; period; double periods; two, three and five 
part song forms. Much attention is given to the analytic 
side, constant reference being made to the words of 
Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Schubert, Schumann, Men- 
delsshon, Chopin, Brahms and others. 

-22. Musical Forms. 3 units. 

A study of the evolution of musical forms, the principles 
of the homophonic and polyphonic styles of composition, 
and the method of their application, presented through a 
comprehensive study of master pieces for voice, solo in- 
struments, various ensemble groups. 
All terms. Miss Quigley. 

25. Counterpoint. 3 units 

This course requires one year's work and covers the follow- 
ing: The conduct of the single melodic part; various 
modes of imitation; the invention forms; chorale-figura- 
tion; fugue and canon. The work alternates with Advanst 
Ear Training. 
Fall, winter and spring terms. Miss Quigley. 

Voice Culture. 1 unit. 

Lectures on the physical basis of tone production; exercise 
for the development oif the voice; study of a limited reper- 



166 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

tory of songs. This course is open to all college students 
and required of all specializing in Public School Music. 
Two hours a week for three terms required for credit 
in the course: 
All terms: Mr. Lindegren. 

27. Class in Artistic Singing. 

A study of the interpretation of masterpieces. Meets twice 
a week. For advanst pupils only. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Alexander. 

29. Normal Choir. 1 unit. 

[Required of all Conservatory Students. Open to all col- 
lege students who qualify. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays. All terms. Professor Alexan- 
der. 

Credits. 

Voice Culture and Teachers' Music will not be credited in the 
third or fourth college year. 

Students who are specializing in music may elect courses in 
Counterpoint, Music Composition, History of Music, Piano, Organ, 
and Harmony for the third or fourth college year. 



DEGREE COURSES 

The following courses count toward a degree: 
Harmony: Music 14-19. 
Counterpoint: Music 23^5. 

Double Counterpoint, Fugue and Composition or Piano, Organ 
or Violin, three years each. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 167 



NATURAL SCIENCES 



Professor William H. Siierzer 

Associate Professor Jessie Phelps. 

Associate Professors Mary A. Goddard, J. Milton Hover and 

T. L. Hankinson 

Student Assistants — Rosalind Brooker, Beatrice Wilson, 

Mary Moore and Clarence Whitney 

Assistant in Physiology and Hygiene ^Caroline A. Supe 

Curator — Charles C. Edwards 

Florist and Gardener — R. A. Henstock 

The class-rooms, laboratories and collections of the depart- 
ment occupy the west half of Science Hall. The laboratory and 
field courses in physiology, biology, zoology, botany, agriculture 
and geology require two hours, but into those two periods is 
intended to be brought all the work of the class, including prep- 
aration of notes, library assignments, reviewing for quizzes, 
etc. In certain indicated subjects these two periods must be 
consecutive. In the other laboratory classes it is very desirable 
that the hour preceding, or immediately following the class hour, 
be left open, and this should be done whenever the schedule will 
possibly permit. Students seeking electives in the department 
are urged to make their selection early in the year and then 
note the term or terms in which these subjects are offered. 
Those upon the general course are notified that their electives 
may be selected from any of the six lines; nature study, biology, 
geology, zoology, botany, agriculture or physiology. The par- 
ticular course that it is desirable to elect will depend upon the 
preparation and prospective work of the student. The various 
instructors will be glad to give advice relative to the selection of 
courses. 

*Also visiting nurse with salary paid by the Interdepartmental 
Social Hygiene Board, Washington, D. C. 



168 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



AGRICULTURE 



The courses offered in agriculture are designed to meet a 
variety of needs, as follows: 

1. Courses for students, specializing in Rural Education. 
Such students should take Agriculture 1, and, if possible, also 
elect courses 5 and 8. 

2. Electives for students in the General Life Certificates Cur- 
riculum. Courses 1, 5 and 7 are recommended for such students. 

3. Courses for students majoring or minoring in Natural 
Sciences. Courses 2, 3 and 4 are recommended. These three 
courses constitute a year's work in agriculture and deal especially 
with the scientific phases of soils, farm crops, and animal hus- 
bandry, and give the student a fundamental conception of modern 
agriculture. 

4. Courses for students desiring to prepare for garden super- 
vision work. For such students, courses 1, 2, 3 and 5 are recom- 
mended for one year's work. If more than one year can be de- 
voted to the preparation, courses 6, 7 and 8 are suggested as 
further electives. 

5. Courses for students preparing for Superintendencies of 
Consolidated Schools and for special teachers of Agriculture. 

6. Courses for students who plan to complete a four-year 
course in the Agricultural College, preparatory to teaching under 
the Smith-Hughes Act. Under the provision of this law, the 
teacher must be a graduate of an agricultural college, but plans 
have been workt out whereby the first two years of this may be 
done in Michigan State Normal College. 

The following distribution of subjects is recommended for a 
two-year course in agriculture for the students classifying under 
above paragraphs 5 and G: 



NATURAL SCIENCES 169 



Preferential General Courses 

English 1 and 3 2 units 

Mathematics 14 and 15 2 units 

Education 1, 2, 3, and 16 4 units 

Teachers' Courses 2 units 

Teaching 2 units 

Preferential Agricultural Courses 

Agriculture 2 (Soils) 1 unit 

Agriculture 3 (Farm Crops) 1 unit 

Agriculture 4 (Animal Husbandry) 1 unit 

Agriculture 5 (Gardening) 1 unit 

Agriculture 8 (Rural Organization) 1 unit 

Preferential Science Courses 

Chemistry 3 and 4 2 units 

Physics 4 and 5 2 units 

Botany 1 and 5 2 units 

Desirable Elective Courses 

Geography 1 Botany 2 

Geology 1 Agriculture 6 

Zoology 4, 6 or 9 Chemistry 7 

Students specializing along any line of agriculture should con- 
sult the head of department in regard to their teachers' courses 
and science electives. 

1. General Agriculture. 1 unit. 

Agriculture is the great basic industry of the country. 
With its problems everyone is directly or indirectly con- 
cerned. This is a foundation course which seeks to give 
the student a general knowledge of the scientific principles 
and practices involved in this industry. The work will be 
made as practical as possible by means of numerous 
laboratory exercises. It is planned for such students as 
can devote only one or two terms to this subject. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 



170 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

2. Soils. 1 unit. 

The object of this course is to give the student a knowl- 
edge of the nature, origin, composition, and management 
of the soil. It should be taken by all students who wish 
to specialize along any line of agricultural work. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Hover. 

3. Farm Crops. 1 unit. 

In the study of farm crops the student will become 
familiar with the botanical nature, uses, distribution, 
types, culture, harvesting, and methods of improvement 
of our common grain, forage, fiber, and root crops. Stu- 
dents specializing in Botany should find this course of 
value inasmuch as many High Schools are introducing 
courses in Agricultural Botany. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

4. Animal Husbandry. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge 
of the various breeds of live stock (including poultry). 
A study of the principles of feeding, judging and man- 
agement of live stock will constitute an important part 
of the work. The dairy and poultry industry will be 
especially emphasized. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

5. Gardening. 1 unit. 

The object of this course is to give teachers such knowl- 
edge of school and home gardening as will be of greatest 
value in educational work. It will consist of a special 
study of the types and culture of both our new and corn- 
mon vegetable crops. The relation of the subject to the 
school will be discussed. Each student will be assigned a 
plot of ground 12 ft. by 30 ft., in which twenty-seven 
vegetables will be grown. The planting, cultivation, suc- 
cession cropping, and control of insect pests by spraying 
will constitute a large portion of the laboratory work. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hover. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 171 



Horticulture. 1 unit. 

In the study of horticulture, emphasis will he placed on 
our common orchard and small fruit crops. The topics 
emphasized will be varieties, culture, propagation, prun- 
ing, care of fruit, and control of diseases by spraying. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Floriculture and Landscape Art. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge 
of the kinds and culture of our common garden flowers 
and ornamental shrubbery. The use of these in the 
planting of home and school grounds will be a feature 
of the work. Each student will make a plan for the 
planting of a city lot or country home, as a practical 
project. The campus and science gardens will be used 
as illustrative material. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hover. 

Agricultural Economics (formerly called Rural Organiza- 
tion). 1 unit. 
The current problems of agriculture are very largely of 
economic origin. This course is devoted primarily to 
a consideration of the economic phases of production, 
marketing and farm management. The readjustments 
in country life as affected by economic conditons are 
also considered. 

Farm Biology. V2 unit. 

This is largely a field course, dealing with the natural 
flora and fauna of the farm. The course will not only 
seek to give an appreciation of the native plant and 
animal life as we find it on the farm, but will also en- 
deavor to show the important relationship which some 
of these bear to agriculture. A nearby typical (farm 
will be selected for intensive study. 
Summer term. Associate Professor Hover. 



172 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



BOTANY 



1. Plant Biology. 1 unit. 

An introduction to the plant world. It acquaints the sti 
dent with some of the fundamental principles of plan 
life, and gives him an understanding of his vital relatio: 
to the world about him. 

If Plant 'Biology be combined with Animal Biology i 
gives a course in General Biology which serves as 
splendid introduction to the whole world of living thing* 
General Biology not only gives a necessary basis fo 
more advanst work in Natural Science, but also deal 
with knowledge essential to grade teachers in order tha 
they may rightly guide children to an appreciation o 
Nature. 

Plants are studied as living, working organisms whic] 
play an important part in the world. Experiments ar 
performed and a microscopic examination of tissues i 
made in order that the student may understand ho\ 
plants carry on their work. Fruits and seeds are studie 
both from the botanical and economic standpoints. Mud 
use is made of the science green house and some es 
cursions are made. Laboratory work lectures and recite 
tions. 
Fall and Winter terms. Associate Professor Hover. 

2. Practical Plant Studies. 1 unit. 

The wild and cultivated plants are studied. Special effor 
is made to acquaint the student with the common weed 
and flowers of the locality and to make him familiar wit! 
the principal plant families. Those species and gener 
which are of most economic importance are selected fo 
illustrating the various families. Much of the work i 



NATUKAL SCIENCES 173 



done in the field, making use of the science garden and 
other parts of the campus, and the nearby woods. A 
few trips are made to interesting localities farther away. 
This is a particularly desirable course for agricultural 
students, and for those intending to teach in the grades. 
It is also the course for any one who wishes to know the 
flowers of field and wood. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Seedless Plants. 1 unit. 

A study is made of many of the seedless forms of plant 
life common to our ponds and streams. Molds, rusts, 
smuts, mushrooms and other fungi common to our local- 
ity, mosses, ferns, lycopods and horsetails are studied. 
Attention is given to questions of fertilization, reproduc- 
tion, alteration of generations, and plant evolution as 
seen in three of the great divisions of the plant kingdom. 
(Stress is laid on the great economic importance of many 
of these lower forms of plant life. Early in the quarter 
a week end collecting trip is made to some near-by lake 
region and toward the close, the conservatories at Belle 
Isle are visited where a fine fern and lycopod collection 
is examined. A few other short field trips are also taken. 
Laboratory work, lectures and recitations. 
Fall term only. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Fungi. V 2 unit. 

The common edible and poisonous mushrooms and other 
fungi of the region are studied. Such questions as their 
identification, manner of growth, conditions under which 
they thrive, methods of preserving herbarium specimens, 
and the economic importance of fungi are considered. 
Illustrated lectures are given and much time is spent 
in the field collecting specimens, studying habitat and 
the damage fungi does to trees, railroad ties, posts, etc. 
Specimens are taken to the laboratory for identification, 
where free use is made of library books and herbarium 



174 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

specimens. Usually one or two trips are made to near-by 

lake regions. 

Summer term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

5. Plant Physiology, 1 unit. 

In Plant Physiology the student gets a practical knowl- 
edge of the work of plants. He has an opportunity to do 
individual experimental work in the laboratory, so that 
he becomes familiar with the handling of laboratory 
equipment and setting up of experiments. Such prob- 
lems as growth, food making, irritability, the nature of 
stored food, the action of ferments and the part played 
in the world by each portion of the plant are considered. 
In order to show how plant organs increase in size and 
attain their mature forms, a study of cell division is 
made. This course is especially practical for agricul- 
tural students land those who expect to teach botany. It 
should be preceded by course 1 or its equivalent. Stu- 
dents who are planning to take Chemistry of Common 
Life, or other work in chemistry, will find it helpful to 
do so, if possible, before taking this course. 
Winter term only. Associate Professor Goddard. 

6. Field Botany. 1 unit. 

Field Botany presupposes high school botany or should 
be preceded by Botany 1 or Botany 2 given in the Nor- 
mal. Plants are studied in relation to their habitat, so 
the course consists largely of out-door work. A study of 
plant societies is made, grouping plants according to the 
amount of light and moisture they require. Attention is 
given to structural adaptation, to environment and to the 
habits of plants. The student becomes familiar with the 
flowers and trees of the vicinity, identifying the latter 
by their buds, bark, fruit and general appearance. Such j 
ecological subjects as cross-pollination, seed distribution, 
and perpetuation of species receive special attention. 
Many economical questions relating to plant life are 
considered. The greater part of the work is done in 



NATURAL SCIENCES 175 



the field. Trips are made to several interesting localities 

outside of Ypsilanti. 

Spring term only. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Plant Embryology. 1 unit. 

This is a study in the embryology of seed plants and is 
really a continuation of Botany 3. Here, as in that 
course, much attention is given to development from 
the evolutionary standpoint. These two courses aim to 
present evolution as seen in the plant world. The de- 
velopment of calyx, corolla, stamens and pistils is traced, 
special attention being given to the formation and growth 
of pollen grains and ovules. The process of fertiliza- 
tion and the development of the embryo are carefully 
studied and explained. This course should be preceded 
by the course in Seedless Plants. 
Winter or spring term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Botanical Problems. 1 unit. 

Students who have had Plant courses 3 and 9 are eligible 
to this course. Individual problems in plant physiology, 
morphology, or ecology are assigned each student, the 
nature of the problem depending upon the materials 
available, the season of the year, and the student's prefer- 
ence. The laboratory study is supplemented by library 
and field work and from time to time each member of 
the class reports as to the methods pursued and results 
obtained. Hours to be arranged. 
Fall or spring term. Associate Professor Goddard. 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds. 1 unit. 

While Botany 11 is designed especially for students taking 
the special courses in Domestic Science and Physical 
Education, it is of practical value to other students as 
well, as it deals with problems of vital interest to all. 
Emphasis is placed on the study of the nature and work 
of those bacteria that affect the home, either in their 



176 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

relation to food, (such as milk, butter, cheese, meats, 
etc.,) or disease. Questions relating to the prevention 
of bacterial diseases are considered. The nature, action, 
and uses of the cultivated yeasts, and their relation to 
the "wild" yeasts, together with the modes of culture and 
destruction of the molds that are a source of annoyance 
in the home are studied. Some attention is also given 
to soil bacteria and their great value. The course is 
given by means of lectures, recitations and laboratory 
practice. 
Fall and Winter terms. Associate Professor Goddard. 

12. Botanical Teaching. V 2 unit. 

Illustrated lectures, assigned reading and discussion 
make up the course. It is designed especially for high 
school teachers of botany and deals with the problem of 
what to teach in schools devoting a semester to the subject 
and what should be included in a year's course. Methods 
of presenting the subject matter are discussed and many 
experiments performed to illustrate the activities of plant 
life. Students are shown how to collect, press and pre- 
serve plant material. Text and library books are dis- 
cussed. Some collecting trips are made. An hour of 
outside work daily is required. 
Summer term. Associate Professor Goddard or assistant. 

13. Civic Biology. % unit. 

Teachers of all grades should understand something of 
the civic problems of a community. Civic Biology deals 
with many of these problems and endeavors to lead the 
student to an understanding of how he can help to 
solve them. It deals with questions of civil forestry; 
edible and poisonous mushrooms; how to combat the 
fly, mosquito, cabbage butterfly and other harmful insects; 
beautifying home grounds; control of weeds; bacteria in 
their relation to soil and disease; and other important 
topics. Civic Biology by Hodge and Dawson is the text 
used. 
Summer session. Associate Professor Goddard. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 177 



GEOLOGY 



Minerals and Rocks. 1 unit. 

A practical course in the study of our common minerals 
and rocks. Blowpipe methods and simple chemical manip- 
ulation are taught. Special attention is given to Mich- 
igan minerals, their occurrence, formation and economic 
importance. An elementary knowledge of chemistry will 
be found helpful, hut is not required. Have you felt the 
need of such work? 

Fall term only, with usually an abridged course during 
the summer. Professor Sherzer. 

Dynamical Geology. 1 unit. 

Studies intended to give some idea of the agencies which 
have determined the shape and character of the earth's 
surface, and which are still at work in modifying it. 
These agencies are classified under the following heads: 
atmospheric, aqueous, glacial, organic and igneous. The 
method of type study is utilized quite largely, the various 
earth features being represented by a special example 
which is studied in some detail. The work consists of 
lectures, reports upon special topics and recitations. The 
lantern and collection of photographs are made use of 
thruout the course. No previous work is assumed, altho 
a knowledge of physics and chemistry as well as of min- 
erals and rocks, will be found helpful. 
Winter term, 11-12. Professor Sherzer. 

Agricultural Geology. y 2 unit. 

An elementary course in laboratory and field geology with 
especial emphasis upon those topics of most interest to 
the student of agriculture. A simple study will be made 
23 



178 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



of the common minerals and rocks from which the bull 
of our northern soils has been derived. With this as •< 
basis, the soils themselves will be made the subject o 
study so far as their origin, composition and distributioi 
are concerned. The geological agencies of chief in 
portance to the agriculturist, such as the atmosphere 
running water, moving ice, plants and animals, will b 
studied in as much detail as time permits. No especia 
preliminary knowledge is presupposed and the course i 
recommended for those who desire a somewhat broade 
foundation for grade work in agriculture or geography. 
Two consecutive hours are desired in order to secur 
sufficient time for field trips and laboratory exercises 
But little additional work will be required. 
Summer session, as needed. Professor Sherzer. 

Field Geology. 1 unit. 

A study of the local surface features of southeaster 
Michigan by means of field trips. This leads into wor 
of ice, water, wind, and organisms, the four great agencic 
chiefly responsible for the physiographic features c| 
Michigan and adjacent regions. Rather detailed reporl j 
of each trip are prepared, illustrated with drawings an 
blue prints and made into a note book. Class discussior 
will be used to fully explain and fix in mind the found, 
tion principles. Pupils looking forward to this coun 
should precede it with Courses 1 and 2 given in tl 
Fall and Winter and confer with the instructor in advan< 
before classifying into it. 
Spring term. Professor Sherzer. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 179 



NATURE STUDY 



Nature Study. 1 unit. 

A special course for those who expect to teach in the 
elementary schools, or who expect to supervise such teach- 
ing. The work is directed by printed outlines and con- 
sists of quizzes, lectures and demonstrations covering the 
elementary principles of Nature and the evolution of the 
inorganic and the organic worlds. The parallel develop- 
ment of the race and the child, the purposes of Nature 
Study, the principles of method and a detailed primary 
and intermediate course are presented and discust as far 
as time permits. Devices for the keeping of live material in 
the school room are exhibited in operation and described. 
So far as the season permits special attention is given 
to the study of the domestic animals, birds and trees, 
although the course is largely professional rather than 
academic. Each term, with an abridged course during the 
summer session. 
Two sections, 9-10 and 11-12. Professor Sherzer. 

Woodcraft Nature Study. 1 unit, 

As it is most desirable to bring the student into close 
touch with Nature, Woodcraft Nature Study consists 
largely of work done in the out of doors. It aims to 
familiarize the student with the common birds, butter- 
flies, flowers, shrubs and trees of the locality which 
are studied in their natural habitat. It gives the nature 
knowledge specially needed by those in charge of Camp 
Fire Girls, the Boy Scouts, Woodcraft League, and similar 
organizations. It is intended to be specially helpful to 
teachers of nature study, but it. deals with information 
which every teacher of natural science in high school 
should know. No previous preparatory courses are re- 



180 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

quired. Reed's Bird Guide, Holland's Butterfly Guide, 

and Michigan Trees, "by Otis, are used for identification 

work. 

Summer session. Associate Professor Goddard. 

3. Elementary Science for Rural Schools. 1 unit. 

A special course planned for those preparing to teach in 
rural schools where of all places it is believed that 
elementary science should find its place. A selected list 
of topics will he presented especially applicable to the 
country environment and presented in the most practical 
manner possible. Short field trips, laboratory exercises 
and classroom demonstration will feature the course 
Among the topics treated will be birds, trees, seed dis- 
tribution, bees, ants, silk moth, minerals, rocks, soils, 
erosion, weather, oxydation, along with the principles of 
natural and artificial selection. 
Spring term. Professor Sherzer. 



PHYSIOLOGY 



"The Proper Study of Mankind is Man." 

1. Elementary Physiology. The same as Animal Biology 2, 1 
unit. 
An introduction to the anatomy, histology, and physiology 
of the vertebrates. For full description see Zoology 2, 
page 172. 

Fall and winter terms. Several sections. Associate Pro- 
fessors Phelps and Hankinson and assistants. 

Is. Institute Physiology. % unit. 

A review of High School physiology designed especially 
to meet the needs of institute students. The topics of 
physiology and hygiene that are most likely to be touched 



NATURAL SCIK 181 

upon in the county examinations will be considered. 
Kellog and O'Shea's The Body in Health is used as a basis 
for the discussions and demonstrations. 
Summer term only. Miss Supe. 

"What a piece of work is Man." 

2. The Human Body. 1 unit. 

A study of the human machine. The general anatomy, 
physiology and hygiene of all the systems of organs of 
the human body will be discussed and demonstrated as 
fully as possible. Especial emphasis will be put upon 
the digestive system. Walter's Physiology and Hygiene 
is the text. Martin's Human Body, 1919 edition of the 
advanst course, is the chief reference. The course pre- 
supposes Chemistry 1 and High School Biology, or equiva- 
lents. Open to. men and women. 
Each term. Associate Professor Phelps. 

2a. Personal Hygiene. Vz or 1 unit. 

A contemplation of the body beautiful, including such 
topics as: care of hair, nails, teeth, skin; baths — cleaning, 
tonic, sedative; hygiene of the nose and throat; preven- 
tion of colds; hygiene of feeding; and care of the sense 
organs. Lectures and reports. For women only. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Phelps and Miss Supe. 

3. Special Hygiene for Women. 1 unit. 

Lectures and assigned readings on woman's place in the 
heme and society, including a study of child-rearing and 
bearing, heredity, teaching the origin of life to young 
children, the problems of eugenics, etc. A large refer- 
ence library is open to the class. 
Each term. Associate Professor Phelps. 

3a. Sex Education. y 2 or 1 unit. 

A series of round-table conferences concerning some of 
the problems of parents and teachers pertaining especially 



182 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

to the sex life of boys and girls and youth. Galloway's 
The Sex Factor in Human Life is an outline of topics 
followed. Supplementary readings are assigned. 
Summer term, and by correspondence. 

4. Teaching Physiology and Hygiene. 1 unit. 

A practical course designed for those who purpose teach- 
ing in the upper grades or the Junior High School. The 
laboratory work makes the student familiar with the 
experiments and apparatus and other material which may 
be used to interest the boys and the girls in the right 
use and care of their own machines. Various new texts 
will be examined and discussed. A few projects will be 
actually tried out, and possible courses will be devised. 
The ideal preparation for the course would be: Chemistry 
1 and 2; Biology 1 and 2; General Physiology; and School 
Hygiene. Winter term. 

"Character is habit packed away." 

5. Mental Hygiene. % or 1 unit. 

A study of mental adjustments, including such topics as: 
relation of the nervous system and the body, the origin 
of the emotions, some of the more common mental dis- 
orders: stuttering, shell-shock, etc. Lectures and assigned 
readings; reports from students. The chief references are 
from Crile, Cannon, Goddard, and Terman. 
Spring and Summer terms, and by correspondence. 
Associate Professor Phelps. 

5a. structure and Development of the Nervous System. 1 unit. 
A study — partly in the laboratory — of the brain and cord 
and sympathetic nervous system of a series of vertebrate 
animals, beginning with the simplest and closing with 
man. The neuron theory; reflexes; localization; and 
functions of the various parts will be given. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Phelps. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 183 



ZOOLOGY 



Animal Biology 1. 1 unit. 

An introductory course profitably taken by those who 
desire a foundation for later work in zoology, or in 
human physiology and also by those who can devote but 
a single term to the study of animal life. Particular at- 
tention will be given to the physiological processes of 
the animal body, but habits, life-histories, relation to 
environment, including man, of important forms, will be 
made prominent. The course is open to first year students. 
No prerequisite. There will be recitations, laboratory 
work, field work, and some lectures. A text-book will be 
used. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Animal Biology 2. 1 unit. 

The more important facts of anatomy and physiology of 
vertebrates will be presented with a view to giving a 
foundation for a later study of human anatomy and 
physiology. A laboratory study of the frog will form 
the basis of the work. The course is open to beginners. 
Accompanying the laboratory work will be lectures and 
recitations, based upon text book and library assignments. 
Smith's Laboratory Guide for the Study of the Frog will 
be needed for laboratory work. 
Fall and winter terms. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Birds and Mammals. 1 unit or V 2 unit. 

The work of this course will be based primarily on field 
and laboratory studies. An opportunity will be given to 
learn the birds and mammals in their native environ- 
ment and to become familiar with identification marks, 



184 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



peculiarities of flight, migrations, song, and nesting habiti I 
of birds. Laboratory work, making use of the larg. 
department collections of birds and mammals, will sup 
plement the field work to determine with more definitenes: j 
species characters and structural adjustments to condi 
tions in their usual habitats. The course is especiall; 1 
adapted to teachers of nature study and elementary agri 
culture or general science in the grades. It is open t-j 
beginners without prerequisites. It is desirable tha 
students should provide themselves with field or oper 
glasses for the bird work. The work of the first six week 
dealing mostly with birds may be taken separately fo 
V 2 credit. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Insects. 1 unit. 

A consideration of the great abundance and diversity c 
insects and their influence on man chiefly as enemies an 
competitors will be given in this course with speck 
attentions to habits, life-histories, social relations, an 
means of control of important forms. Much attentio 
will be given to methods of collecting insects and makin 
permanent collections of them and also ways of keepin 
insects alive and rearing them under school and hon 
conditions. Facts of importance to students of gener; 
biology will be taught. The course will be found especiall 
valuable to those preparing to teach nature study or agr 
culture as well as those preparing for the profession i 
medicine. Sanderson and Jackson's Elementary Ent 
mology is used as a text. The course is open to beginne 
without previous training in zoology. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Invertebrate Zoology. I unit. 

The purpose of this course is to give a general surv< 
of the groups of invertebrate animals without duplies 
ing work given in other courses. It comprises studi 
of the structure, physiology, classification, life-histori* 



NATURAL SCIENCES 185 

habits and distribution, with special attention to the 
most important types and to the local fauna. Students 
intending to teach science, especially biology in schools 
of high school grade should take this course. No prere- 
quisite. Lectures, laboratory work, and occasional recita- 
tions. Hegner's College Zoology is used as a text. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Vertebrate Zoology. 1 unit. 

The structure, physiology, classification, life-histories, 
habits, and distribution of vertebrate animals is con- 
sidered. Special attention is given to the comparative 
anatomy of a few of the most important types, and to 
the natural history of local vertebrates excepting birds 
and mammals, which are studied in course 3. This 
course is similar in aim and method to the course in 
Invertebrate Zoology. While the course logically follows 
Zoology 5, it may be taken by beginners. Hegner's Col- 
lege Zoology is used as a text. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Mammalian Anatomy. 1 unit. 

A laboratory course on the gross anatomy of the cat, or 
rabbit, including comparisons with other vertebrates 
particularly man and the domestic animals. The work is 
of especial value to those intending to teach human 
physiology, physical training or agriculture. In order 
to be admitted to this course the student must have 
taken either Zoology 2 (Animal Biology 2), or Zoology 
6 (Vertebrate Zoology). 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Animal Embryology. 1 unit. 

An introduction to the fundamental facts and principles 
of the reproduction and development of animals. Lec- 
tures, laboratory work, and recitations. In the labora- 
tory a study is made of the life-histories of a few of the 
most important types, with special attention to such 



186 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

features as the development of the germ cells, fertiliza- 
tion, cleavage, gastrulation, early embryo-formation and 
the development of organs. The lectures include a con- 
sideration of the more general aspects of the subject, 
such as the physical basis of heredity, the biogenetic 
law, theories of development, and modern experimental 
work in the field of embryology. The course aims to 
give an insight into general biological problems, as well 
as the key to the adult structure of animals and the 
basis for an understanding of the special embryology 
of man. Kellicott's Outlines of Chordate Development is 
used as a text. The course is not open to first year 
students, except by special permission; at least one 
term's work in animal biology or zoology is a prerequisite. 
This course will not be given in 1923 but in 1924 since 
it alternates with course 10. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

9. Heredity and Eugenics. 1 unit/ 

Illustrated lectures, assigned reading and discussions, 
dealing with the more fundamental aspects of inherit- 
ance with particular reference to man. The course aims 
to present the biological facts and principles underlying 
the phenomena of heredity, and the more important re- 
sults of modern work in the study of inheritance in 
plants, animals and the human species. It should serve 
as a basis for a critical understanding of the modern 
eugenics movement. Some of the topics considered are: 
inheritance defined and illustrated; current misconcep- 
tions; reproduction, development and the physical basis 
of heredity; the question of the inheritance of acquired 
characters; Mendel's principles of heredity; sex-determi- 
nation; sex-linked inheritance; pure line breeding and 
the genotype conception of heredity; application of the 
principles of heredity to the improvement of domesticated 
races of plants and animals; the method of evolution; 
the Inheritance of physical and mental traits in man,: 
and the possible Improvement of the human race thru 



NATURAL SCIENCES 187 

the intelligent appreciation of the known laws of inheri- 
tance. This course should be preceded by Zoology 1 or 
its equivalent. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Hankinson. 

Methods in Zoology. 1 unit. 

A teachers' course in laboratory and field methods, for 
students who have had at least two terms' work in 
animal biology or zoology of college grade. The aim 
of the work is to give the student the technical knowl- 
edge and training required for conducting high school 
courses in zoology. Students are taught methods of col- 
lecting and caring for living material, preparing ma- 
terial for class use, and making permanent anatomical 
and histological preparations. The equipment of high 
school laboratories, and the aims and methods of labora- 
tory teaching, are discust. This course alternates with 
Course 8 in successive years; course 10 will be given 
in 1923, but not in 1924. 
Spring term. Associate Professor HanKinson. 

Zoology, Organic Evolution and Heredity. V 2 unit. 

A special course, elementary in its nature but intended 
for mature students. It deals with the historical de- 
velopment of the subject and endeavors to make clear 
the theories and principles involved, takes up numerous 
illustrations drawn from the plant and animal world 
and extends the discussions to the human race. During 
the winter just passed the course has been given as a 
somewhat popular presentation of the theories and evi- 
dences of Evolution by specialists in the Normal College 
and University of Michigan. Tues. and Thurs., 3-4. 
Science Hall. 



DEGREE COURSES 

For work of the last two college years the courses in Botany 
1 and Nature Study 1 are not ordinarily accepted. Specializing 



188 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

students or those selecting majors and minors in the department 
may elect any of the other courses which have not already been 
used in securing their certificates. General students may also 
elect from this list upon the advice of the head of the depart- 
ment. Courses in Botany 9 and 10, Zoology 8 and 10 are espec- 
ially intended for advanst students who have had the requisite 
amount of preparatory work. Those desiring these courses 
should confer with the instructors concerned. 



SPECIALIZING STUDENTS 

Students of special aptitude in the natural sciences and with 
some successful experience in teaching are invited to make ap 
plication for enrollment as specializing students of the department 
after one or more subjects have been completed. A limited 
number of such students will be accepted, only as many as there 
is reasonable hope of locating in our Michigan high schools. 
From this list of students there are selected "student assistants," 
who give the department two hours' time daily and receive $153 
compensation. 



PENMANSHIP 



Guy R. Newberry 

The aim of the course is to train students to express thought 
in plain rapid hand writing without conscious physical effort. 

A credit in writing is earned by satisfying three requirements 
as follows: 

Pen practice, Blackboard writing, and a final written report on 
class management and methods of teaching writing. 

Text-book, Palmer's Method of Business Writing. 

An advanst course for those desiring to supervise writing in 
public schools is now offered. Hours, 7-8 and 11-12 a. m.; 
4~r> p. m. High school rooms. 






PHYSICAL EDUCATION 189 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Professor Wilber P. Bowen 

Associate Professors — Mrs. Fannie Cheever Burton, Joseph 

H. MoCulloch, Dr. Glenadine C. Snow 

Assistant Professors — Anna M. Wolfe, Lloyd W. Olds. 

Instructors — Irene 0. Clark, Chloe Todd, Mabel P. Bacon, 

Ruth Boughner, Agnes Dodge, Grace Ryan 

Assistant — Bertha Warner 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

This department offers work of two kinds: 

(a) Physical Education. This consists of lectures, recitations 
and laboratory work, designed to prepare teachers and super- 
visors of physical training. These classes are, with a few 
exceptions, open to both men and women. The department also 
offers courses in Hygiene, which are listed and described separ- 
ately on page 194. 

(b) Physical Training. This consists of practice in the gym- 
nasium, field, or swimming pool, designed to improve the physical 
condition of students and to make them familiar with material 
used in the schools. Here the classes for men and women are 
separate and a special suit is necessary. 

Each student is given a physical examination on entering the 
College and effort is made to make the work beneficial and to 
prevent injury. Those who are disabled or physically unfit for 
certain parts of the work are given special exercises suited to 
their needs. Special classes of women are conducted with this 
object in view (See Course W-22). 



190 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

CREDITS AND REQUIREMENTS 

The college requires physical training of all candidates for the 
life certificate. The requirement is usually four terms; the 
specific requirement for each group is stated in the former pages 
outlining the various curricula. (See pages 72 to 93.) 

Students should begin physical training at once on entering, 
to avoid trouble due to conflicts and crowding of work that are 
apt to occur if it is left to be done later. 

Work in physical training is markt and credited as in other 
subjects, the nature of the work making regularity of attendance 
even more necessary than in other college work. 

Credits for physical training and for other subjects are not 
interchangeable; that is, extra credits in physical training cannot 
be used in place of academic or professional subjects that a 
student lacks, nor can extra credits in other college subjects 
take the place of the required units of physical training. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES 

1. Mechanics of Exercise. 1 unit. 

A text-book course on the machanism of bodily movements 
and the anatomy of muscles, bones and joints. The mech- 
anism of bodily deformities and spinal curvatures is 
included. 
Fall term. Professor Bowen. 

2. Human Anatomy. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and demon- 
strations on the structure of the organs of digestion, cir- 
culation, respiration, and excretion, and of the nervous 
system. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen and Dr. Snow. 

3. Exercise in Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A text-book course on the fundamental principles of bodily 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 191 

training and the methods and systems employed in 

physical education. 

Fall term. Professor Bowen. 

Corrective Gymnastics. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and demon- 
strations on the causation and mechanics of bodily de- 
formities and practice in the treatment of such cases in 
the corrective rooms. Spinal curvature, flat foot and 
other remediable defects are included and students learn 
to use active and passive movement and massage under 
supervision. 

Winter term. Professor Bowen and Misses Bacon and 
Clark. 

Physiology of Digestion, Nutrition and Excretion. 1 unit. 

A text-book course presupposing courses 1 and 2 or an 
equivalent and also acquaintance with the chemistry of 
foods or with organic chemistry. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen. 

Physiology of Exercise. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and labora- 
tory work, on the physiology of muscle, nerve, circulation 
and respiration, with especial relation to the effects of 
bodily exercise. 
Spring term. Professor Bowen. 

History and Literature of Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A course of lectures and library work covering the history 
of physical education and making a systematic survey of 
the literature of the subject. Special study is made of the 
literature on important guiding principles of physical 
training. Each student is expected to make a rather com- 
plete study of a chosen topic and to write a thesis upon it, 
Fall and Spring term. Professor Bowen, 



192 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

8. The Teaching of Physical Training in the Grades. 1 unit. 

A course for grade teachers, designed to prepare them to 
teach gymnastics and games to grade children. 
Every term. Professor Bowen and Associate Professor 
Burton. 

9. First Aid. V 2 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures, demonstra- 
tions and laboratory work, in bandaging, treatment of 
sprains, and other items of emergency work. 
Fall term. Associate Professor McCulloch and Dr. Snow, 

10. Health Inspection. 1 unit. 

Theory and practice of physical examination and diagnosis. 
Mrs. Snow. 

12. Teachers' Course in Gymnastics. 1 unit. 

A study of gymnastic exercises from the teacher's stand- 
point, use of commands, presentation of new material, 
observation, criticism and management of classes, train- 
ing of posture, etc. Members of the class practice the 
teaching of posture exercises, exercises with dumb bells, 
clubs, and wands, marching, fancy steps, folk dancing, 
and story plays. Designed for special students of Physical 
Education. Others take Course 8. 
Fall term. Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Burton 

13. Teachers' Course in Play. 1 unit. 

Text-book work on the theory of play, lectures on the 
practical management of the playground, and demonstra 
tion and practice of games. On the practical side the 
following topics are treated: equipment, apparatus, courts 
games, tournaments, festivals, efficiency tests, grow 
athletics, folk dancing, dramatics, manual constructive 
work, and story-telling. Open only to special students o: 
Physical Education and teachers of experience. 
Winter term. Professor Bowen and Misses Boughner am 
Dodge. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 193 



Theory of Football and Basket Ball. 1 unit. 
A course designed to give men who expect to coach or 
officiate in these sports an intimate knowledge of the 
rules, the technique and the strategy of each. It includes 
discussion of training, diet, prevention and treatment 
of injuries, equipment, systems of offense and defense, 
and hints for officials. Men only. 
Winter term. Professor McCulloch. 

Theory of Base Ball and Track Athletics. 1 unit. 

A course for men specializing in physical education or 
who expect to coach or officiate in these sports. Rules, 
methods of training and officiating and the technique and 
strategy of each is studied. 
Spring term. Mr. Olds. 

Teaching Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A considerable number of students on the second and 
third years of the physical education course have oppor- 
tunity to teach some phase of the work, either in the 
children's classes of the training school, the Normal 
High School, or in the classes of college men and women 
in the gymnasium, field, and swimming pool. Students 
whose previous experience or special aptitude enables 
them to take full charge of a class may be able to earn 
a full unit of credit in one term, but if the student 
acts as an assistant to the regular teacher and handles 
the class but a portion of the time, more than one term 
is needed to earn the full credit. 

Advanst Teaching in Physical Education. 1 unit. 

A limited number of students showing special aptitude 
in course 19 have opportunity to teach with full charge 
of a class and full responsibility for it. The work varies 
from term to term according to the needs of the depart- 
ment and the demands for certain kinds of physical 
training. 

25 



194 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



21. Administration of Physical Education. 1 unit. 

The planning of courses of physical training to meet the 
conditions of city and rural schools, principles of super- 
vision, construction and equipment of buildings, grounds, 
swimming pools, etc. 
.Spring term. Professor Bowen. 

22. Teachers' Course in Athletics for Women. 1 unit. 

A course designed to give women who intend to coach 

and manage girls' athletics and officiate in such sports a 

full technical knowledge of the rules, ways of playing 

and coaching, and the handling of large numbers in such 

exercises. 

Spring and summer terms. Miss Todd. 

HYGIENE COURSES 

1. School Hygiene. 1 unit. 

A text-book course, supplemented by lectures and library 
work, on the main topics of school hygiene. The object 
of the course is to interest and inform prospective teach- 
ers regarding modern methods of health administration 
and health instruction in the grades of the public schools. 
Every term. Professor Bowen, Associate Professor Mc- 
culloch, and Dr. Snow. 

2. Personal Hygiene. 1 unit. 

A text-book course for men, covering the main topics of 
personal hygiene, designed to stand as an equivalent for 
the course in physiology and hygiene for women that is 
given in the Natural Science department. Men only. 
Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor McCulloch. 

3. Health Work in the Schools. 1 unit. 

A study of topics and methods of promoting health in the 

various grades. 

Winter and summer terms. Dr. Snow. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 195 



PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 

Women entering the College in the fall have a choice among 
ix courses: Physical Training Wll, W12, W13, W14, W15, and 
*V16. Those found to be physically unfit for such vigorous 
ixercise are assigned to W17 or W22. 

The three remaining units of required physical training are 
grouped according to the grade of teaching for which the 
;tudent is preparing. Those who are preparing to teach in high 
;chools take Wl, W2, and W3; intermediate grades or junior 
ligh school, W4, W5, and W6; those who plan to teach in the 
dndergarten or primary grades, W7, W8, and W9. The last 
equired courses, viz., W3, W6, and W9, are teachers' courses, 
giving practice in teaching physical training. 

The regulation suit, which costs about $5, consists of plain 
vhite middy blouse and full black bloomers. This is required 
or classes in the gymnasium and can be used in outdoor games, 
uch as tennis, hockey, baseball and volley ball. The regulation 
wimming suit is of light gray cotton. Students are advised 
o purchase suits of authorized firms here, since that plan has 
)roven most satisfactory. Soft-soled shoes are required in 
Tmnasium classes and in tennis. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Note.— Courses for women specializing in Physical Education 
ire listed separately on page 197. 

VI. Swedish Gymnastics, Dancing and Games Suitable for High 
School Teachers. 1 unit. Winter term. 

V2. German Gymnastics, Dancing and Games for High School 
Teachers. 1 unit. Spring term. 

Teachers' Course following Wl and W2. Each term. 
These three courses are under general charge of Mrs. 
Burton and Miss Todd and are required of women prepar- 
ing to teach in high schools. 



196 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






W4. Gymnastics, Dancing and Games Suitable for Teachers of 
Upper Grades. 1 unit. Winter term. 

W5. Similar to Wi. 1 unit. Spring term. 

W6. Teachers' Course, following W4 and W5. Fall and spring 
terms. 

These three courses are under general charge of Misses 
Ryan and Dodge, and are required of women preparing to 
teach in the intermediate grades. 

W7. Exercises Suitable for Teachers of Primary Grades. 1 unit. 
Winter term. 

W8. Similar to Wl. Spring term. 

W9. Teachers' Course, following Wl and W8. Each term. 

These three courses are under the general charge of Misses 
Clark and JBoughner, and are required of women preparing 
to teach in the kindergarten or primary grades. 

Wll. Folk Dancing. 1 unit. Each term. 

W12. Swimming. 1 unit. Each term. 

W13. Volley Ball. V 2 unit. Fall and spring terms. 

W14. Basket Ball. 1 unit. Winter term. 

W15. Tennis. % unit. Each term except winter. 

W16. Hockey. 1 unit. Fall term. 

W17. Cross Country Walking. 1 unit. Fall term. 

W18. Baseball for Women. 1 unit. Spring term. 
Played with soft indoor ball. 

W20. Aesthetic Dancing. 1 unit. Winter term. 

W22. Special II Hijicnic and Corrective Exercises. 

Special exercises adapted to the needs of those found 
physically deficient. Each term. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 197 

SUMMARY OF COURSES FOR WOMEN 

1 Fall term: Wll, W12, W13, W14, W15, W16, W17, W22. 

i Winter term: Wl, W3, W4, W7, W9, Wll, W12, W14, W22. 

I Spring term: W2, W3, W5, W6, W8, W9, Wll, W18, W22. 

BOURSES FOR WOMEN SPECIALIZING IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

Hockey 6 weeks, Folk Dancing 6 weeks. 

Swimming. 

Swedish gymnastics and Dancing. 

Basket Ball and Volley Ball. 

Swedish gymnastics, Dancing, and Light Apparatus. 

Baseball and Tennis. 

Aesthetic Dancing. 

Soccer and Heavy Apparatus. 

Swedish gymnastics and Dancing. 

Swimming and Athletics. 

Folk Dancing. 

.Swimming, Tennis and Athletics. 

Outdoor Athletics. 

Teaching and Officiating. 

Dancing and Military Drill. 

Coaching and Officiating. 

Bowling, Archery. 

Coaching and Officiating. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR MEN 

Physical training Ml, M2, M5 and M9 are required of all men 
xcept when a man is transferred to another course because of 
physical disability or because of ability to take a more advanced 
ourse. Men are also expected to be able to swim. The other 
ourses described below may be taken as electives. 

In all indoor courses except swimming a regulation suit is 
'equired, and this is the usual white track suit, costing about 
2.50. Soft-soled shoes are needed in addition. Another special 



Vs 


1. 


Vs 


2. 


Vs 


3. 


Vs 


4. 


Vs 


5. 


Vs 


6. 


Vs 


7. 


Vs 


8. 


Vs 


9. 


Vs 


10. 


Vs 


11. 


Vs 


12. 


Vs 


13. 


Vs 


14. 


Vs 


15. 


Vs 


16. 


Vs 


17. 


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18. 



198 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

suit, better adapted for work in heavy gymnastics, is required of 
men who specialize in physical education. 

COURSES FOR MEN 

Ml. Gymnastics and Indoor Athletics. 1 unit. 

This course, which should be taken by all men in the 
winter term of the first year, includes posture training, 
general gymnastics and athletics suitable for boys of high 
school age, basket ball, volley ball, indoor base ball, and 
other indoor games. Required. 
Winter term. Associate Professor Olds and assistants. 

M2. Field Athletics. 1 unit. 

This course, which should be taken by all men in the 
fall term of the first year, includes training in soccer and 
in the elements of football and other field sports. Required. 
Fall term. Associate Professor Olds. 

M3. Swimming. 1 unit. 

This course includes instruction and practice in swimming, 
diving and life saving. Every man is expected to be able 
to swim 100 yards, to use at least three standard swim- 
ming strokes and two forms of diving. 
Elective for those who pass the requirement. 
Each term. 

M4. Tennis. 1 unit. 

The college courts afford opportunity for from 40 to 50 
men to play tennis, and in the Spring term a team plays 
several games with teams from other colleges. When the 
weather in the Pall and Spring prevents the playing of 
tennis, some work in the gymnasium, such as basket ball, 
volley ball or swimming is substituted so as to permit the 
earning of a full unit of credit. Elective. 
Pall, spring and Bummer terms. Professor Bo wen and 
assistants. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 199 

M5. Track and Field Sports. 1 unit. 

Instruction and practice in the details of all the standard 
track and field sports. A college team has dual meets 
with teams from other colleges and takes part in the 
Michigan Intercollegiate Track and Field Meet in June. 
Class contests are scheduled for the men not making the 
team. Required. There is also opportunity <for indoor 
training in the winter term. 
Spring term. Associate Professor Olds. 

M6. Basketball. 1 unit. 

We usually have 50 men or more enrolled in basketball. 
A college team is selected and a second team, each playing 
a schedule of games with the teams of other institutions. 
Men not making these teams are organized into a class 
league of six or eight teams and they play a tournament 
among themselves and with other local teams. Elective. 
Winter term and the last few weeks of the fall term. 
Professor McCullooh and assistants. 

M8. Football. 1 unit. 

Instruction is given each fall to 40-60 men in the college 
game of football. A first team plays about seven games 
with the teams of other colleges and a second team 
usually has a shorter schedule. Elective. 
Fall term. Professor MoCulloch and assistants. 

M9. Baseball. 1 unit. 

A large class is conducted in this sport, including a first 
team and several class teams. Effort is made to train 
all the men in the details of batting, base running, fielding, 
signals, team work, plays, rules, etc. Required. 
Spring and summer terms. Professor McCulloch. 

M10. Folk Dancing. 1 unit. 

This course is designed to acquaint men who are pre- 
paring to supervise physical training with the most im- 



200 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

portant forms of folk dancing, especially forms that are 

useful for boys and men. 

Fall term. Associate Professor Burton. 

SUMMARY OF COURSES FOR MEN 

Fall term: Ml, M2, M3, M4, M6 (last 4 weeks), M8, M10. 
Winter term: Ml, M3, M5, M6. 
Spring term: M3, M4, M5, M9. 

COURSES FOR MEN SPECIALIZING IN PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION 

Ms 1 Light Gymnastics. 

Ms 2 Light and Heavy Apparatus Work. 

Ms 3 Heavy Apparatus and Tumbling. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 



Professor Frederick R. Gorton 
Assistant Professor Harry L. Smith. 

The department suggests the following three-year curriculum 
combining the Physical and Biological Sciences: 

Education 1, 2, 3, 4, Physics 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, Zoology 20, 23 and 

and 20 and 10 24 

English 1 Chemistry 3, 4, 5, Nature Study 7 

Teaching and 7 Physiology 17 

German, French, or Astronomy 1 

Spanish, two Botany 8, 9, 10 Geology 27 and 28 

years 

Also a three-year curriculum in the Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences aa follows: 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 



201 



Education 1, 2, 3, 4, Physics 4, 5, 6, 7, Mathematics 11, 12, 
20, and 25 9, and 10 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 

19, and 25 
Geography 2 Chemistry 3, 4, 5, Astronomy 1 

and 7 
English 1 German, French, or Teaching 

Spanish, two 
years 

By a careful selection of courses in English, Modern 
Languages, Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry the student 
even in two years can obtain an excellent foundation for engineer- 
ing or further specialization in industrial physics or chemistry. 

Students intending to continue work in College Physics (4, 5, 
or 6) should take Trigonometry in high school or the first term 
after entering the Normal College. 

All rooms are in Science Hall for the following subjects. 

For a description of equipment, see page 42. 

Ml. Mechanics. 1 unit. 

A class-room and laboratory course in the mechanics of 
solids and fluids. This is the fundamental subject in 
Physics and should be taken by all who have not had a 
year's work in an approved high school following the com- 
pletion of Algebra and Geometry. 

Fall term, with two one-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Assistant Professor Smith. 



M2. Sound, Heat and Light. 1 unit. 

An elementary course in heat, light and sound with 
abundant demonstrative and laboratory work. As in the 
preceding course, the graphical method is freely used and 
the processes of Algebra and Geometry constantly em- 
ployed. Emphasis is placed on the numerous applica- 
tions of the principles developt to every day life. Pre- 
requisite: Ml. 

Winter term, with two one-hour periods a week of labora- 
tory work. Assistant Professor Smith. 



202 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

3. Magnetism and Electricity. 1 unit. 

A full demonstrative course, with student's laboratory- 
work. The various uses made of electricity in common 
life are strongly emphasized. Trips are taken and ob- 
servations made of the applications of electricity in 
electric railway service, welding, etc. Generating plants 
of the Edison Company are also visited. Prerequisite: Ml. 
Spring term. Two one-hour periods a week of laboratory 
work. Assistant Professor Smith. 

4. College Physics 1. 1 unit. 

Electricity and magnetism. An advanst course in which 
electrical theory and electrical discovery are strongly 
emphasized. Follows Physics 1, 2, and 3, or an approved 
course in a high school. Courses 4, 5, and 6 are funda- 
mental courses for many branches of engineering and 
medicine. Four recitations and lectures and one two- 
hour period per week in the laboratory. Course 20 may 
be elected giving one-half unit for two terms of work. 
Note. — Students classifying in Physics Jj. toho have not 
had Trigonometry should take that subject (Math. 14) 
in the fall term. 

Fall term. Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor 
Smith. 

5. College Physics 2. 1 unit. 

A demonstrative and mathematical course in advanst 
mechanics. Prerequisite: one year of Physics and a 
course in Trigonometry. Four recitations and lectures 
and one two-hour period per week in the laboratory. 
"Winter term. Two sections. Professor Gorton and Assist- 
ant Professor (Smith. 

0. College Physics 3. 1 unit. 

An advanst demonstrative course in acoustics and optics. 
Four recitations and lectures and one two-hour period 
per week in the laboratory. Prerequisite: course 5. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 203 



Spring term. Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor 
Smith. 

Method in Physics and General Science. 1 unit. 

A course devoted to the preparation of students for teach- 
ing Physics and General Science in the high school. The 
first portion of the time is given to a careful considera- 
tion of the aims and content of a course in General 
Science. Numerous references to articles by the foremost 
promoters are discust, pertaining particularly to the pro- 
cess of relating this early science to common life. The 
remainder of the time is given to the equipment of a 
physical laboratory, care of apparatus, the adaptation of 
simplified devices, and methods of effective demonstration 
before a class. All students whose major or minor work 
is in physical science will take the course in their senior 
year. 
Spring term. Professor Gorton. 

Principles of Physics. 1 unit. Summer only. 

A review course in high school physics. It will deal 
mainly with the principal laws of physics and their appli- 
cation. The course is intended for students who have had 
the subject in high school, with inadequate facilities for 
demonstrative experiments. A special feature of this 
course will be the study of the transmission and trans- 
formation of power by the electric road which passes 
through the city, and the municipal pumping and lighting 
station operating from the Huron River. A trip to one 
of the several power houses of the Edison Company will 
be one of the features of the course. X-ray work and the 
wireless telegraph will be seen in operation. Daily. 
Professor Gorton or Assistant Professor Smith. 

Advanst Laboratory Practice 1. 1 unit. 

Regular college work in Mechanics and Light, following 
Physics 5 and 6 in case no laboratory work accompanied 
those courses. The student is given opportunity to make 



204 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

use of refined apparatus in measurements in elasticity, 

moments of inertia, and other mechanical properties 

of material, and also of the optical bench, spectrometer, 

and diffraction gratings in the determination of optical 

constants. 

Fall and spring terms. Assistant Professor Smith. 

10. Advanst Laboratory Practice 2. 1 unit. 

Regular college work in Electricity, Magnetism and Heat, 
following Physics 4 in case no laboratory work accom- 
panied that course. Practical exercises dealing with the 
measurement of current, voltage, resistance, capacity, 
magnetic and thermal quantities constitute the principal 
features of this course. Incidentally the student becomes 
familiar with the storage battery, generators, gas 
calorimeter, and other parts of the College equipment. 
Winter and summer terms. Assistant Professor Smith. 

11. Acoustics. V2 unit. 

A six weeks' course in the physical basis of sound with 
special reference to those who are carrying forward 
studies in music, using Harris's Handbook or some equiv- 
alent author. This course embraces a study of the con- 
struction of the piano, organ and other instruments. 
Winter term. Professor Gorton. 

12. Physical Technics. 1 unit. 

A course in general laboratory repairing and fitting, to- 
gether with instruction in photography. The work in- 
cludes out-door practice with the camera, development and 
printing. Some opportunity is also given for making 
lantern slides and photographic enlarging. Some op 
portunity for operating a motion picture machine will be 
offered. Time is also given to the study of simple wire- 
less telegraphs and radiophone sets suitable for high 
school. The course is designed for specializing students 
and is taken only by permission. 
Professor Gorton and assistant. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 205 

Electrical Measurements 1. 1 unit. 

A college course following a year of College Physics and 
Physics 9 and 10. The scope of the work includes the 
the methods of measuring resistance and current by 
various methods using high grade apparatus and re- 
quiring a good degree of care and accuracy. Courses 13 
and 14 are strictly college subjects. The course is both 
theoretical and practical. 

Fall term. Hours to be arranged by the instructor. 
Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor Smith. 

Electrical Measurements 2. 1 unit. 

A course following the one above. The theory and prac- 
tice of measurement as applied to electromotive force and 
capacity. Magnetic measurements also form a large por- 
tion of the course, and the student attains some degree of 
skill in magnetic testing of material. 

"Winter term. Hour to be arranged by the instructor. 
Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor Smith. 

Advanst Theoretical Optics. 1 unit. 

A reading course in Drude's Optics or equivalent work, 

with special reference to the following practical course. 

Follows Physics 6 and requires an elementary course in 

the Calculus. Given only when called for by five or more 

students. 

Term and hour to be arranged with the teacher. 

Professor Gorton. 

. Advanst Practical Optics. 1 unit. 

A course in Mann's Advanst Practical Optics, or an 
equivalent, bringing into use the Interferometer, the Re- 
fractometer, the Diffraction Bench and various polari- 
scopes and Saccharimeters. May be taken as an inde- 
pendent course or may follow Course 15. Sequence as in 
the following course. 
Term and hour to be arranged. Professor Gorton. 



206 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

17. Household Laboratory Physics. 

Arranged especially for students of Domestic Science. 
The course is largely experimental work in the laboratory 
and deals exclusively with those parts of the subject 
which apply directly to operations and devices about the 
home. Among the special features of the work may be 
mentioned the following: Efficiency of cooking vessels, 
efficiency of electric lamps, operating cost of gas and 
electric heating devices, heating plants, ventilation, etc. 
Fall term. Professor Gorton and Assistant Professor 
Smith. 

19. A First Course in Applied Physics. 

A beginning course prepared especially for young women 
who are pursuing any specializing curriculum. It con- 
sists largely of lectures and demonstrations, with a mini- 
mum of mathematics. Attention will be given to the 
great names associated with the development of science. 
The subject will deal in a practical way with many 
cases of applied physics in the home and every-day life, 
and will cover, as far as time will permit, some of the 
fundamentals of x-ray properties and wireless communica- 
tion. Such a selection of topics will be made as to ac- 
commodate the course to one term of work. The work 
is offered for those who would otherwise be unable 
to obtain any physical science course. 
Fall and winter terms. Professor Gorton. 

20. Problems in Physics. 3/4 unit. 

This course which has to do entirely with the solution 
of practical problems in physics is offered for those who 
are taking Physics 4, 5, and 6 thru the year. To obtain 
this credit for the work requires one hour per week for 
three terms and parallels a corresponding course in 
electrical engineering. Students who expect later to take 
up an engineering course should elect this subject. 
Professor Gorton. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 207 

Radio Theory and Practice. 1 unit. Summer only. 

The demand for a theoretical and practical course in 
radio transmission and reception has led to the intro- 
duction of this sulbject. The work offered will consist 
about equally of lectures, quizzes, and laboratory test- 
ing. A thoro study of the modern vacuum tube and 
its uses in practical wireless telephony and telegraphy 

* will be emphasized. Receiving sets will be assembled 
and some transmission work will be involved in the 
course. A good high school course in physics is presup- 
posed. 

9-11, daily. Professor Gorton. 



ASTRONOMY 



General Astronomy. 1 unit. 

A non-mathematical course addrest to the large popular 
interest in the subject. The course contains a great deal 
of material of use not only to teachers of science, but to 
the teacher of the grades. Some evening work upon 
planet and star observation with the telescope and trac- 
ing out many of the principal constellations is a feature 
of the course. The use of the transit instrument as well 
as the wireless telegraph installation in getting exact 
time and correcting the chronometer receives consider- 
able attention. 
Fall and Spring terms. Professor Gorton. 

Instrumental Astronomy. 1 unit. 

A practical course in Astronomy following Astronomy 1 
and a good course in Spherical Trigonometry, consisting 
mainly of work with Sextant and a two-inch Astronom- 
ical Transit and the continued use from the preceding 
course of the Wilson material and the four-inch refractor. 
Professor Gorton. 



208 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



RURAL EDUCATION 



Professor M. S. Pittman. 

*Miss Ella Smith. 

Miss Muriel Wilkinson. 

*Miss Louise Welden. 

1. School Management and Course of Study. 1 unit. 

In this course a study is made (1) of principles of or- 
ganization and management, and of their application in 
a rural school; (2) of the Manual and Course of Study 
for the Elementary Schools of Michigan. Bulletins pub- 
lisht by the Department of Public Instruction are studied 
to acquaint the student with recommendations of the 
department concerning organization and management and 
to supplement the subject matter of the course of study. 
Fall and Summer terms. 

2. Principles of Teaching. 1 unit. 

This course is an adaptation of Education 3 to rural 
school conditions. Principles of teaching studied in the 
classroom are observed in practice in the rural training 
school. Prerequisite to rural practice teaching. 
Fall and Winter terms. 

3. Grammar for Rural Schools. 1 unit. 

A rigorous review is taken of the fundamentals in Eng- 
lish Grammar. Teachers in rural schools need a thorough 
mastery of the science of the mother tongue. After this 
is assured, special attention is given to the teaching of 
grammar as it should be done in rural schools. Fall 
term. 



♦Absent on leave. 



RURAL EDUCATION 209 

Language for Rural Schools. 1 unit. 

To acquire the art of story telling, dramatization, oral 
and written composition as they should be taught in the 
elementary rural school is the purpose of this course. 
There will be much observation and classroom practice. 
Winter term. 

Teachers' Arithmetic. 1 unit. 

This course consists of a review of the typical parts of 
arithmetic and of a discussion of present day tendencies 
and methods in the teaching of the subject. It will be 
conducted in such a way as to show how arithmetic may 
be taught in terms of the country child's environment. 
Spring or Summer. 

Rural Leadership. 1 unit. 

No need in American society is greater today than that 
of leadership in rural life. This course looks toward 
leadership in five different positions: Principals of con- 
solidated rural schools, supervisors of rural schools, 
county school commissioners (superintendent) ; critic or 
principal of county normal school. These positions are 
closely related. They all look toward the same general 
service — rural life. The work of each of these will be 
analyzed. As a part of the course the class will conduct 
a demonstration in rural school supervision. Each mem- 
ber of the class will do field work for two weeks during 
the year and will devote himself to the special study 
of the problems of teaching some one school subject. 
Field work, classroom discussions and class reports. 
Fall and iSummer terms. 

Rural Economics (elective). 1 unit. 

To present and clarify some of the fundamental princi- 
ples of economics and apply them to the rural situation 

27 



210 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

is the aim of this course. Field study, readings, and 
text-book work will be required. 
Winter term. 

8. Rural Sociology. 1 unit. 

The social situation in rural America is much more com- 
plex than in pioneer times. Specialization in farming, 
the consolidated school, the community church, farm 
economic and social organizations, the effect of good 
roads, auto motive power, scientific methods, and inter- 
national trade make rural social life a subject of grip- 
ping interest. Text-book, field work, and readings. 
Spring term. 

Note. — All students who are taking Rural Education courses 
are thereby members of the Trailblazer Club which meets on 
Monday evening of alternate weeks. 

RURAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

The Stone School, located six miles from Ypsilanti on the D. J. 
& €. electric line, is affiliated with the State Normal College ani 
is taught by a member of its training school faculty. It is the 
demonstration and training school of the Rural Education De- 
partment. There students observe the application of principles 
of teaching and management prior to their practice teaching, 
Students who are certificated from this department spend one- 
half of each school day for a term of twelve weeks in this school, 
devoting their time to practice teaching, Observation, and assist 
ing the training teacher. They are made responsible for the 
room while teaching and participate in all activities of the 
community in which the school has a part. 

FIELD PRACTICE 

Eleven one-teacher rural schools in Washtenaw County an 
affiliated with the Rural Department of the Normal School. Thes( 
schools serve as a practice field for those students who are pre 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 211 



paring for rural leadership. The number of schools in Washte- 
naw and Wayne counties will be increast as the demand in- 
creases. Field practice is provided for in addition to teaching 
and is required of all students who are training for rural leader- 
ship. 

The great interest which is now being taken thruout the 
state and nation in rural life is a prophecy of the educational 
demands of the very near future. Consolidated schools are being 
formed more rapidly than suitable teachers can be trained for 
them. Specialization in rural education has already become 
not only a desirable but a necessary thing to do. Teachers for 
rural elementary and high school need 'to have not only broad 
general culture and expert classroom technique but also the point 
of view and special training to fit them for effective rural service. 
The rural situation demands men and women of full college 
training. It is possible for a person to receive either the A.B. 
or B.S. degree specializing in the field of rural education. Per- 
sons desiring such a course should confer with the head of the 
department. 

Those who desire to take a Degree from the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College with a view to becoming eligible as Smith- 
Hughes' teachers in high schools should refer to page 70 under 
natural sciences for the first two years of the course. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



DETROIT CENTER 

Associate Professor Chas. M. Elliot, Director 

Miss Lenore Conover Miss Fanny S. Fletcher 

Miss Gertrude Van Adestine Miss Clara B. Stoddard 

See page — for an outline of this curriculum. 
Foreseeing the need of teachers for special types of children 
who cannot get on under the usual grade conditions, the State 



212 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Board of Education in 1914 offered a six weeks' course for 
training special teachers at the Michigan Home and Training 
School for the Feeble-Minded at Lapeer. It soon appeared to be 
desirable to offer such a course at the Normal College where 
general educational courses were also offered, consequently the 
work was transferred to the Michigan State Normal College in 
the summer of 1915. In the meantime there came a growing 
demand for special teachers of the blind, the deaf and the 
crippled. Clinical facilities for this type of work can be found 
only in the larger cities. No city in the country has made 
more extensive provision for the misfit child than has Detroit. 
It seemed desirable, therefore, to utilize the admirable facilities 
offered at Detroit and consequently on invitation of the Detroit 
school authorities the Michigan State Normal College establisht 
a center for the training of teachers of special education in con- 
nection with the Detroit Teachers' College. The State Normal 
College will continue to give the preliminary training necessary 
for entering upon this special work. It will also maintain as a 
part of the training school a room for subnormal children. This 
room will be utilized for observation and for laboratory purposes 
by the general classes in education. 

All persons who wish to equip themselves to teach any type of 
special class will hereafter enroll at the Detroit center. The 
course will cover one year of special training, credit for which 
will apply upon the requirements for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in Education issued by the Normal College. 

Only persons of intelligence and successful teaching experience 
should undertake the training and instruction of these classes. 
For that reason the entrance requirements to the course are 
placed high. Generally speaking, it is expected that candidates 
for entrance will have had at least two years beyond the high 
school; that is, a preparation equivalent to that of a graduate 
of a standard normal school. However, exceptions to this require- 
ment will be made in the case of persons who have been especially 
successful as teachers. But all candidates who have not had 
a normal school education or its equivalent should submit 
their recommendations and testimonials early, so that they may 
receive a reply before the opening of the fall term. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 213 



1. The Hygiene of the School Child. 1 unit. 

The hygiene of the physical and mental growth of the 
child. The hygiene of posture, vision, hearing, nose and 
throat, speech and voice, etc. Preventive mental hygiene 
and the education of nervous children. The child is 
made the center of the hygienic studies throughout, 
rather than his physical surroundings. 
Professor Elliott. 

2. Mental Deficiency. 1 unit. 

Character and extent of mental deficiency; its causes and 
prevention; physical and mental characteristics of men- 
tal defectives; different types and the possibility of their 
development; psychology of backward and defective 
children in relation to their training and instruction. 
Much opportunity will be given for observation of type 
cases, and clinical study of feeble-minded children. 
Professor Elliott. 

3. Psychological Testing. 1 unit. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student practical 
experience, under supervision, in the use of psychologi- 
cal tests as a means of discovering the various mental 
levels among school children. A study will be made of 
both the individual and group methods of measuring 
intelligence. 
Professor Elliott. 

4. Juvenile Delinquency. 1 unit. 

A study of the relation of mentality to conduct among 
children of school age; insubordination, incorrigibility, 
truancy, and juvenile crime considered from the stand- 
point of their relation to emotional instability, mental 
conflicts, and suppressed experiences. 
Professor Elliott. 

5. Heredity and Eugenics. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the more fundamental aspects of 



214 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

inheritance with particular reference to man. It aims 
to present the biological facts and principles underlying 
the phenomena of heredity, and the more important re- 
sults of modern work in the study of inheritance in 
plants, animals and the human species. It should serve 
as a basis of the critical understanding of the modern 
eugenics movement. 
Miss Conover. 

6. The Pathology of the Crippled Child. 1 unit. 

A study of the commonest diseases which cause crippled 
conditions, such as infantile paralysis, osteomyelitis, 
tuberculosis of the joints, etc. This course also includes 
sufficient training in anatomy that the student may un- 
derstand the purpose and value of the work done in the 
muscle training clinic, and other forms of corrective 
work. 

1. Mechanism of the Ear. 1 unit. 

A study of the physiology of the ear and the process of 
hearing; causes of deafness; retardation of the hard-of- 
hearing child; testing of hearing, degree of hearing in- 
terpreted according to school-room standards to deter- 
mine educational possibilities through this medium; 
auricular training to improve residual hearing. 
Miss Van Adestine. 

8. Science of the Elements of Speech. 1 unit. 

A course designed to show the development of speech 
from a physiological viewpoint; a study of the speech 
organs; their structure and use; development of con- 
sonants and vowels, their proper formation and resonance; 
rhythm and continuity of speech; how to diagram 
to illustrate speech formation; Belville Bell symbols 
of Visible Speech. 
Miss Van Adestine. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 215 



Pedagogy for Teachers of the Deaf. 1 unit. 

Methods of adapting general pedagogy to the require- 
ments of the deaf child; developing his language con- 
cept through object teaching, commands, action (Barry's 
Five Column Slate), stories, question and answer forms, 
composition, letter writing and reading. Lip reading 
development with 

(1) the beginner who has no knowledge of language, 

(2) the pupil who has become deaf after acquiring lan- 
guage. 

Miss Van Adestine. 

Blindness; Its Causes and Prevention. 1 unit. 

This course will cover in a general way the anatomy, 
physiology and hygiene of the eye. Cause of blindness 
and measures leading to the elimination of such causes; 
special emphasis on possibilities of the prevention of 
iblindness, and on conservation of sight. 
Miss Fletcher. 

Special Pedagogy of the Blind and Parti 'ally '-sighted. 1 unit. 
Among' topics considered will be the following: History 
of the Education of the Blind, Model School-room Equip- 
ment, Ideal lighting conditions, economic and social aims 
in the education of the blind, special problems. This 
course will be closely correlated with observation and 
practice work in the classes for the blind and sight 
conservation classes. 
Miss Fletcher. 

Stammering and Cognate Defects. 1 unit. 

This course, with the two following, is designed to train 
teachers who wish to specialize in the correction of 
speech defects. The medical, psychological, and remedial 
aspects are covered. Lectures upon the causes of these 
defects, and upon the theories advanced by prominent 
authorities concerning them and a system for their cor- 



21Q NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



rection, will be given. A speech clinic, for practice 
work, will be maintained throughout the entire course. 
Miss Stoddard. 

13. Defective Speech. 1 unit. 

This course deals with the classification and correction of 
Lisping, Burring, Lalling, Defective Phonation, Infantile 
Speech, Nasality, Foreign Accent, Aphonia, and Hoarse 
Voice. Special attention is given to the anatomy of the j 
speech mechanism, obstructions in nose and throat 
tongue-tie, hare lip, cleft palate, teeth malformations and 
resultant speech, with clinic demonstration. 
Miss Stoddard. 

14. Phonetics and Voice. 1 unit. 

This course gives lectures upon the formation and develop, 
ment of the elementary English sounds, the normal voice 
and the voice in neurology. The diganosis of speed 
defects; corrective physical, oral and vocal gymnastics 
speech tests for mentality; and a system for recordin, 
and tabulating will be fully explained and illustrated. 
Miss Stoddard. 



SPEECH 



Proffesor J. Stuart Lathers. 

Associate Proffesor Frederick B. McKay. 

Assistant Proffesor Ida G. Hintz 

The work of the debating clubs and the Public Speaking ai 
debating contests is done under the direction of Associate Pi 
fessor McKay. 

Students specializing in this department are required to ta 
part of their work in the English department. 



SPEECH 217 

Teachers' Reading. 1 unit. 

This course is a preparation for teaching reading in the 
public schools. It deals with the fundamental principles 
underlying intermediate and primary reading, the steps 
essential to a systematic course, selection and organiza- 
tion of material and the relation of the reading work to 
literature. A portion of the term is used in developing 
the students' ability to read thru practice. 

The course should not be elected by students doing pre- 
paratory work. 

Fall, winter, a*nd spring terms. Professor Lathers, Asso- 
ciate Professor McKay, and Assistant Professor Hintz. . 

Fundamentals of Interpretive Reading 1. 1 unit. 

The primary purpose of this course is to enable the stu- 
dent, thru training, to develop poise and ease before an 
audience, and a clear, agreeable and forceful voice based 
upon proper breathing and correct posture. Second, it 
deals with such fundamental problems in the oral inter- 
pretation of literature as grouping, central ideas and subor- 
dination, thought sequence, emotional values, etc., in their 
relation processes. Numerous illustrative selections are 
used in the study of these problems. In the latter part 
of the term, definite platform work in interpretation is 
begun and selections are prepared and given before the 
class for criticism and suggestion. 

Fall, Winter and Spring terms. Assistant Professor 
Hintz. 

Fundamentals of Interpretive Reading 2. 1 unit. 

This course is a continuation of Speech 2. Both phases 
of the work started in the preceding course are continued 
with more difficult and varied problems. Thru extensive 
reading, students familiarize themselves with the works 
of certain authors. This reading serves as a background 
for the intensive class study and individual interpreta- 
tion of selections from their works. 



218 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Pantomine and character study are taken up and platform 
work is done in which students prepare scenes from long 
plays or entire one-act plays. 
Fall and Spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

4. Public Speaking 1. 1 unit. 

A first coure in public speaking adapted to the needs of 
those who have little or no experience in speaking before 
an audience. The course opens with a study of the prin- 
ciples and practice of parliamentary procedure intended 
ods of conducting business meetings ot various kinds 
This is followed by regular programs consisting of decla 
mations, short original talks, debates, after^dinnei 
speeches, etc. One day of each week is given to lectures 
and discussions upon the principles of thought, composi 
tion and delivery. Little of the work is written, the grea 
purpose of the course being to learn to think upon one' 

feet 

Fall and spring terms. Associate Professor McKay. 

5. Public Speaking 2. 1 unit. 

A continuation of Public Speaking 1. It aims to furthe 
the development of ability in practical public speakmj 
fitting one to appear before an audience and present hi 
ideas clearly and forcibly. Original speeches are mad 
upon a great variety of topics popularly discust. The pru 
ciples of public speaking are presented thru lectures r 
ports and a study of the speeches of great orators. It 
of special value to those who may have charge of simili 
work in high school either as teachers of English or in tl 
position of superintendent or principal or who wish 
acquire platform ability. This course should be preced( 
by Speech 4 or an equivalent amount of work. 
Fall term. Associate Professor McKay. 

(;. Argumentation and Debate. 1 unit. 

The course opens with a text-book study of the principl 
underlying argumentation. This is followed by platfoi , 



SPEECH 219 

debates upon important questions of the day with special 
attention given to the logical and effective arrangement 
of arguments and an easy, forceful delivery. The class 
is divided into sections and each section is given oppor- 
tunity to debate against other sections. The preparation 
of briefs precedes these discussions, with the aim of or- 
ganizing the thought and discussing the topic more intel- 
ligently. This course is intended to develop, thru investi- 
gation, practice and criticism, the habit of logical, con- 
secutive thinking, and commends itself, not only to those 
who wish to learn the art of thinking upon one's feet, 
but particularly to all who may have to supervise liter- 
ary or debating societies in the public schools. It should 
be preceded by speech 4 or an equivalent amount of 
work. 
Winter term. Associate Professor McKay. 

f. Shakespearean Reading. 1 unit. 

Study of the principles of dramatic structure, and an 
examination of the plots and characters of Shakespearean 
drama as they will bear upon the vocal expression of the 
selections. Studies will be made of passages from Hamlet, 
Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Merchant of Venice, and Mid- 
summer Night's Dream. 
Winter term. Professor Lathers. 

I. Critical Readings. 1 unit. 

An advanst course in reading intended for teachers en- 
gaged in high school English or for students who are 
doing special work in English or Speech. 

It consists of a study of the aesthetic and rhetorical 
principles of style as related to the vocal interpretation 
of great literature. The work will be based upon the 
study of selections from English and American master- 
pieces in prose and verse. 
Spring term. Professor Lathers. 



220 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

9. Dramatization. 1 unit. 

A study of the manifestations of the dramatic instinct in 
children and the educational value of dramatic perfor- 
mances in the school. The dramatization of stories suited 
to the various grades. Discussion of pagents and festivals 
and practice in stage deportment and management. 
Winter and spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

10. Oral Discussion. 1 unit. 

The first purpose of the course is to develop thru general 
discussions, the individual presentation of topics and ac- 
companying reading, definite ideas upon a round of re- 
lated subjects, particularly with reference to their under- 
lying principles. The second purpose is to develop the 
power to organize ideas, to give them oral expression in 
good English, and to defend them with confidence. Clear 
ideas and clear, convincing expression are the objectives. 
Illustrative of the problems considered are: Does the 
world grow better, The purpose of man's existence, Man 
at the beginning of his human career, Growing truth, How 
problems arise, The practical versus the ideal point of 
view, Individualism, Socialism, Social struggle, The single 
tax. Any subject so related as to enable the student to see 
more clearly the purpose and trend of* life and his place 
in it is eligible for discussion. It is not a public speaking 
course; the method is rather that of the round table. 
Written work is reduced to the minumum tho students are 
asked to keep a notebook for briefly recording the discus- 
sions. 
Winter and spring terms. Associate Professor McKay. 

11. Interpretative Reading. 1 unit. 

This course is intended for students who have had con- 
siderable work in reading and public speaking or English. 
The work is designed to aid students in the presentation 
of readings of some length and difficulty in fiction poetry 



srEECii 221 

and drama. Students should consult the instructor before 

electing this course. 

Spring term. Professor Lathers. 

Readings in Victorian Poetry. 1 unit. 

A study of the poetry of the Victorian period. Review of 

the intellectual, artistic and political movements of the 

period and their relation to the poetry. Special attention 

is given to the oral interpretation of Browning and 

Tennyson. 

Spring term. Professor Lathers. 

Story Telling. 1 unit. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
various types of stories — fables, folk-tales, myths, hero- 
stories and the like, and to choose those which are suited 
to the needs of the different grades. The emphasis is 
placed on the expression side and after a discussion of the 
principles which underlie the art of story-telling, as much 
practice as possible is given to the actual telling of the 
story. 
Fall, winter, and spring terms. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

Play Production. 1 unit. 

A study of the problems involved in staging plays in the 
high school. Specifically it deals with the selection of 
suitable plays, the principles governing staging, make-up 
and costuming with an examination of modern theories 
regarding stage scenery and settings. The class will have 
opportunity to apply these principles in actual presenta- 
tion of parts on a suitable stage and if casts can be made 
up from the class an evening program of short plays or 
one long play will be presented. 
Winter and spring terms. Professor Lathers. 

Speech Correction. 1 unit. 

This course is offered to meet the demand for teachers who 
can intelligently diagnose and treat the less serious cases 



222 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

of defective speech in children. As a background for the 
course, an investigation is made of the whole mechanism 
and use of the voice, and its relation to thinking and feel- 
ing processes. This is followed by a study of the symptoms 
and causes of speech defects, such as stuttering, lisping, 
negligent speech, nasality and harshness of voice, etc. 
The course will be supplemented by the offering of oppor- 
tunities for actual clinical experience. 
Winter term. Assistant Professor Hintz. 

16. Public Speaking for Men in Physical Education. 1 unit. 
A course designed to give platform experience adapted to 
the needs of men specializing in physical education. Its 
purpose is to qualify such men to present their work confi- 
dently and to represent their field creditably before stu- 
dent assemblies, teachers' groups, business men's clubs and 
community gatherings. The albility to organize thoughts, 
and to reason consecutively and speak with fluency upon 
one's feet are the objectives. To this end there is regu- 
lar, platform practice in presenting short speeches upon 
current issues with criticism. Written work is reduced to 
the minimum and oral preparation emphasized in the 
effort to develop the power to grip ideas, to retaiin them in 
solution and to deliver them clearly and forcefully. Men 
not specializing in physical education will be admitted 
only by special permission. 
Winter term. Asssociation Professor McKay. 

DEGREE COURSES 

Course 1 will not be credited on the work of the third or fourth 
college year. 

Students not specializing in this department may elect Courses 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 in the third or 
fourth college year. 



Training Department 



Dimon H. Roberts, A. M., Superintendent. 
J. Burns Fuller, A. M., Principal of High School. 

For list of training instructors, see page 21. 



PURPOSE AND PLAN 

The leading purpose of this school is to afford an opportunity 
> the student for both observation and practical work in the 

hoolroom. It is here that theory and practice meet, and con- 
iquently the work of this department should test in a very large 
jieasure the ability of the teacher to do successful work in the 
lublic schools of the state. As far as possible the aim is to make 
le school fulfill a double function in being both a model and a 

aining school. An attempt is made to keep abreast of the times 

; all that pertains to the interests of the children who constitute 
ie school. Special attention is given to planning and execution, 
ie keeping of school records, and the general management of the 
jrade room. All work is done under the general direction of the 
iuperintendent, who is the executive of the department. 

The course of study is continuous thru kindergarten, elemen- 
ary grades, and high school. 

While the school was established primarily for the purpose of 
-aining teachers, yet the principle is maintained that the interests 
f the pupils are the most important consideration; and it is 
elieved that whatever advances the well-being of the child best 
erves the purpose for which the school is created. 

The pupils enrolled come from the city and surrounding country, 
"uition is free to all. At present nearly all supplies are furnisht 
n the lower grades ; and in the higher grades pupils are required 
o furnish only such books as represent the more formal work. 

All applications for admission of new pupils should be made at 



224 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

the office of the superintendent. Those entering from other schools 
will facilitate matters by bringing with them letters of transfer, 
records, or promotion cards. On account of the large demand for 
admission, only children of normal age for the various grades can 
be admitted. 

Children are admitted to the kindergarten between the ages of 
four and six years, but may not be admitted to the first grade 
before the age of six. Promotion will take place regularly three 
times a year at the opening of each school term, thus making it 
possible to begin the work of a grade in September, January, and 
April. By this plan the system of promotion is made more flex 
ible, inasmuch as each grade contains three sections separated 
from one another in time by one-third of the school year. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

All work in observation and student teaching must be done dur 
ing the second year of the life certificate course, except in the cast 
of those who are to take the limited certificate. Under the latter 
condition the Training Department practice and observation ma) 
be made a part of the last full term's work. 

Under the present arrangement of the college year the teachi^ 
terms will be the fall, the winter, and the spring. Carefully noU 
the following. 

1. All students must have completed the courses in Educatioi 
1, 2, and 3 before entering upon the work of this department. 

2. At least three of the fundamental teachers' courses in th 
common branches must be successfully past, and all condition 
and failures in academic or professional subjects vital to succes y 
must be removed before students are admitted for observation o 
teaching in the Training Department. 

3. Students are not permitted to take more than two subject 
in college in addition to the regular training work without pej 
mission from the committee on extra subjects. 

4. The number of students teachers doing work in the depar 
ment during any one term will be limited approximately t 
one-third the membership of the sophomore class. 

5. The amount of teaching and observation required will I 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 225 



one hundred minutes per day, during one term. The regular work 
in this department counts the same as two academic subjects and 
is entitled to as much time for outside preparation. 

6. All assignments for work in the training department and 
changes in the same are made by the superintendent. 

7. By special arrangement with the superintendent and the 
head of the college department concerned students may elect one- 
half of their teaching in the department in which they are spe- 
cializing. 

8. All students classfying for work in this department must 
reserve the hour from 3 to 4 for conference with the training 
teacher. 

9. The work in the Training Department consists of teaching, 
observation, making subject and lesson plans, assisting the train- 
ing teacher in various ways, making written reports, attending 
conferences and general meetings, and becoming familiar with 
the course of study and workings of the school. 

HOURS FOR TEACHING 

The hours in the Training Department are from 8:30 to 11 for 
the kindergarten, and first four grades; from 8:30 to 11:30 for the 
other grades; and from 8:00 to 12:00' for the high school. In the 
afternoon all grades except the kindergarten are in session from 
1:00 to 3:00. The half-hours before 9:00 and after 11:00 o'clock 
in the elementary grades so far as possible are reserved for train- 
ing teachers. 

SUBJECT PLANS 

In order that the work in the department may be systematically 
planned and executed, the student teacher is required to make and 
submit subject plans based upon the scope or extent of the mate- 
rial included in the general notion involved. 

The training teacher will direct the time and manner for their 
use. 

29 



226 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

LESSON PLANS 

For more specific work of daily recitations carefully prepared 
lesson plans are required from each student teacher. 

OBSERVATION 

One of the most important features of the work in this depart- 
ment is the observation of the method and management of the 
schoolroom. Carefully prepared outlines are placed in the hands 
of the student teacher as a basis for such observation. These out- 
lines deal with the mechanical management of a grade and prac- 
tical schoolroom psychology and child study. 

As occasion offers, a carefully planned illustrative lesson is con- 
ducted by each training teacher in the presence of the student 
teachers of the grade. A plan is placed before the student teach- 
ers, and the criticism period of that day is devoted to a discussion 
of the plan, the method employed, and results attained. 

TRAINING TEACHERS 

Each training teacher in the Elementary School has charge of 
a grade, devotes a part of her time to the teaching of the same, 
supervises the work of the student teachers, and observes and 
makes needed reports to the superintendent of the department. 

The amount of teaching done by the training teacher varies as 
the interest and work of the school demand her personal efforts. 
For two weeks at the opening of each term, the instruction is 
largely in her hands. She is expected to take charge of one or 
more classes each day for the benefit of such teachers as most 
need her assistance. We believe most decidedly in the value of 
model teaching by those who are fully prepared for such work 
both by training and experience. 

The training teacher has immediate charge of all the work of 
the student teachers in directing the making of subject and lesson 
plans, the work of observation, the writing of reports based on 
observations in the schoolroom, and the execution of plans. She 
meets her student teachers twice each week at three o'clock in a 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 227 



general conference for the purpose of reviewing the work of the 
grade, examining lesson plans, instructing in method, and hearing 
and discussing reports of observations in child study. The super- 
intendent of the department meets all student teachers once 
each week for a general lecture on things pertaining to profes- 
sional success. 

HONOR TEACHING 

At the close of each term's work, the training teacher of each 
grade may choose from the student teachers who have been work- 
ing with her, the one who has shown herself the most efficient 
from the standpoint of scholarship, teaching ability, and general 
power in school management to act as her assistant during the 
succeeding term. No one shall be selected for this honor, whose 
scholarship record falls below "C". The student so selected shall 
be called the honor teacher and the work done may be substituted 
for one of the required teachers' courses, or used as a free elec- 
tive. Honor teachers are expectd to give two hours each day to 
the work in the grade for which they have been chosen. The 
giving of model lessons, helping in the details of schoolroom 
management and assisting in the critic work constitute some of 
the duties. 

SCHOOL EXERCISES 

•Chapel exercises are held regularly on Friday morning of each 
week in the Training Department assembly hall. These exercises 
consist of a simple devotional program, supplemented each time 
with music and dramatizations by the children from one or more 
of the grades. 

Special programs appropriate to the occasion are given at 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, 
and at the close of the school year. 

All of these exercises are public, and patrons and friends of the 
school are cordially invited to attend. Student teachers are 
especially welcome and are invited to join the children in the 
devotional part of the program. 



228 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

THE COURSES OF STUDY 

Suggestive outlines of work in English, nature study, history, 
geography, arithmetic, music, drawing, physical training, manual 
training and home economics are followed in all grades of the de- 
partment. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

The High School is a part of the Training Department and 
serves also as a college preparatory department. There are the 
usual entrance requirements including the satisfactory completion 
of the work of the eight grades. Students who have comipleted a 
part of the course in an accepted high school will receive credit 
for such work. Those entering from other high schools will re- 
ceive credit upon examination or after classification on trial in 
suitable courses, at the discretion of the Principal. 

The course of study falls into three divisions or curricula, spec-< 
ified as A, B, and C. The students who expect to enter the literary 
or general course of any college or university will take curriculum 
A, those wishing to take a scientific or engineering course will 
pursue curriculum B, and those who do not expect to enter college 
may pursue the course as outlined under curriculum C. Students 
who wish to take a language course will pursue curriculum A. 
electing two additional years of foreign language. In curriculum 
A two years of history must be taken. In curriculum C there are 
required besides the specfied English two units in each of twc 
different subjects. For students who expect to enter the Normal 
College we recommend a minimum of three years of English, twc 
years of mathematics, two years of history, and two years ol 
science. 

A special course in agriculture conforming to the Smith-Hughe* 
plan is offered to students desiring to pursue such a course. Thi; 
course includes: first year, agricultural botany, mechanical draw 
ing (farm tools), manual training (farm tools); second year 
farm crops and horticulture; third year, animal husbandary 
fourth year, farm mechanics, farm management, and soils. Oi 
account of the large number of electives this course can b 
adapted readily to curriculum C. 



TRAINING DEPARTMENT 



229 



A student should carry four subjects. If a student shows him- 
self capable of doing so he will be allowed to take an additional 
subject. All students are required to take physical training un- 
less otherwise excused. Physical training pursued three hours 
per week for one year counts as one-third unit. A maximum of 
one unit in physical training may be counted toward graduation 
in any curriculum. 

Students pursuing curriculum C may secure a maximum of one 
unit in music when the work is taken under the direction of a 
teacher accredited by the school. A student must practice a mini- 
mum of one hour per day and receive one lesson each week. One 
year's work in music will count as one credit. Music will not be 
counted toward college entrance requirements. 

Each student should choose the curriculum he will follow and 
the electives he will take only after consultation with the prin- 
cipal. 

One subject pursued for twelve weeks gives one credit. Three 
credits equal one unit. Sixteen units are required for graduation. 



CURRICULUM OF STUDIES 



PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS 



A 

IX. 

English 
Algebra 
For. Lang. 
Gen. Sci., Hist., 
Man. Art. 



X. 



English 
Geometry 
For. Lang. 
Elective 



XI. 

English 

U. S. Hist. & Civics 

Elective 

Elective 



B 

IX. 

English 
Algebra 
For. Lang. 
Botany or 
Man. Arts 

X. 

English 
Geometry 
For. Lang. 
Zoology or 
Man. Arts 

XI. 

English 

Physics 

Alg. & 'Solid Geom. 

Elective 



English 
Math. 
Science 
Elective 



English 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 




IX. 



X. 



XI. 



English 
U. IS. Hist. 
Elective 
Elective 



& Civics 



230 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



XII. 

English 

Physics or Chemistry 

Elective 

Elective 



XII. XII. 

Chemistry English 

U. ;S. (Hist. & Civics Elective 

Elective Elective 

Elective Elective 



ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 



History 

Latin 

French 

Agriculture 

Spanish 

[Botany 

Zoology 

Drawing 

Geography 

Dom. Art 

Dom. 'Science 

Manual Tr. 

XI. 

Latin 
.French 
German 
Spanish 
Chemistry 
Dom. Art 
Dom. 'Science 
Manual Tr. 



XII. 

Latin 
French 

German 

Econ. & iSociol. 



XI. 

Drawing 
History 
For. Lang. 
Dom. Art 
Dom. Science 
Manual Tr. 
Geography 



XII. 

Adv. Math. 

English 

Econ. & ISociol. 

IManual Tr. 

F o r e i gn La n gn a ge 



€ 

IX. 

Dom. Art 

Dom. Science 

Manual Tr. 

Agriculture 

History 

For. Language 

X. 

Dom. Art 

Dom. Science 

Manual Tr. 

Agriculture 

'History 

Math. 

(For. Language 

QBot. or Zoology 



XL 

For. Language 
Dom. Art 
Dom. IScience 
Manual Tr. 
Agriculture 
Math. 
Drawing 
Pub. Speaking 
Geography 
Chemistry 

XII. 

Econ. & ( Sociol. 

For. Language 

Math. 

Dom. 'Science 

Manual Tr. 

Agriculture 

Physics 

Dom. Art 



Conservatory of Music 



AFFILIATION WITH THE COLLEGE 

The Conservatory was organized in the year 1880 by the author- 
ity of the State Board of Education. It is affiliated with the Col- 
lege, and is under the general control af the President, and under 
the direct supervision of the Director, who is also the head of the 
Department of Music in the College. 

FACULTY OF CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Charles McKenny, A.M., LL.D., President. 
Frederick Alexander, Director. A.B University of Michigan. 

Piano Instructors 

Miss Mary Dickinson. Pupil of Leschetizky. 

Miss Grace Emery. Michigan State Normal Conservatory — Piano 

Course. 
Miss Agnes Wardroper. Michigan State Normal Conservatory — 

Piano Course. 
Miss Madge Quigley. Michigan State Normal Conservatory 

Piano Course. 
James R. Breakey, Jr. Pupil of Mrs. Baskerville and Wager 

Swayne. 

Voice Instructors 

Carl Lindergren. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon. 

Mrs. Annis Dexter Gray. Pupil of Herbert Witherspoon. 

Violin Instructor 
Edward Mosiier. 



232 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Theory Instructors 

Miss Madge Quigley. Michigan State Normal Conservatory — 

Piano Course. 
Russell L. Gee. Michigan State Normal College; Institute of 

Musical Art, New York. Pupil of T. Tertius Noble. 

Public School Music 

Miss Clyde E. Foster. Holt School of Music and American Insti- 
tute of Normal iMethods. Student with Marie Hofer, Chi- 
cago,and Nelson Burritt, New York 

Miss Greta Forte. Graduate Conservatory of Music; Columbia 
B. S. 1921. 

Miss Ellatheda Spofford. Graduate, Conservatory of Music, 
Michigan State Normal College. 

CALENDAR 

The year is divided into three terms of twelve weeks each, 
designated Fall, "Winter and Spring, and they begin at the same 
date as the corresponding terms in the Normal College. See year 
Book, which may be obtained by addressing the (Secretary of the 
Normal College. 

A part of the Conservatory courses are given during the six 
weeks' summer school. Special bulletins for these classes will be 
sent upon application. 

The State Normal Conservatory is one of the oldest schools of 
music in the state. It was organized under its present name in 
1880. The Conservatory constitutes the department of music of 
the Michigan Normal College, which was opened in 1852, and is 
the oldest normal school in the west. No institution in Michigan 
has done more for musical education in the state. The Normal 
College Conservatory is, in all particulars, better qualified to train 
teachers of public school music and to give high grade instruc- 
tion in voice, organ, piano, violin, than ever before. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 233 



THE HOME OF THE CONSERVATORY 

In 1915, the Normal College dedicated the Frederic H Pease 
Auditorium, which is named in honor of the man who, for 45 
ears, was the director of the Conservatory. The Auditorium is 
ji beautiful building with a capacity of seating two thousand, and 
s modern in every detail. The Conservatory has ample accomo- 
lation in the Auditorium building. 



THE FACULTY 

While adequate and attractive accomodation and equipment 
ire desirable, high class teachers are a necessity. In musical 
sducation the question is not what school did you attend, but with 
what teachers have you studied? The Normal College Conserva- 
tory takes pride in the quality of its teachers. Not only have they 
a native aptitude for teaching, but they represent extensive musi- 
cal education under teachers of international reputation. 

THE ARTISTIC ATMOSPHERE 

It is an accepted fact that the atmosphere of a school of music 
or art is one of the determining qualities. Art appeals to the 
emotions. In the last analysis it must stir the aesthetic (feelings. 
If it does not do this it is not art. For this reason a school of 
music should be situated in an artistic atmosphere. In this res- 
pect the Normal College is favored. Ypsilanti is a beautiful little 
city in one of the most charming sections of Michigan. The 
Huron valley, in which Ypsilanti Is situated, for scenic effects is 
unsurpassed in Michigan. 

The art department of the Normal College is a contributing 
factor to the artistic atmosphere of the school. 

But alfter all from the point of view of music, it is the musical 
atmosphere that counts most. In this respect Ypsilanti is for- 
tunate. Through musical numbers in the college assembly, re- 
hearsals and recitals by the faculty of music and students of the 
Conservatory, concerts by the Normal choir and glee clubs, and 
the concert course, Ypsilanti creates within itself a musical at- 



234 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

mosphere. The nearness to Ann Arbor — a twenty minute trolley- 
ride — and to Detroit — a trolley ride of one hour and twenty 
minutes — gives the added advantages of hearing at a minimum 
cost the great artists who visit these cities. The celebrated May 
Festival at Ann Arbor presents the leading musical artists of the 
world. A member of the conservatory faculty recently said that 
she found greater musical opportunities in Ypsilanti than she 
had in a city of four hundred thousand from which she came. 

AIM OF THE CONSERVATORY 

The Conservatory has two distinct aims: first, to train teachers 
of public school music; second, to offer opportunity to persons 
who desire to study voice or an instrument. A great many who 
are preparing to teach in grade positions or in high school wish 
to add to their general culture and usefulness by becoming some- 
what proficient in music and to such the Conservatory offers I 
exceptional advantages. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SCHOLARSHIP AND CULTURE 

A practical musical education demands more than the ability 
to sing or play an instrument. It demands a general intelligence 
which comes from the study of other subjects than music. Ypsi- 
lanti offers ample opportunity for such study. All the depart- 
ments of the Normal College are open to students of the Conserva- 
tory on the payment of the tuition fee. The courses in modern 
languages, literature and art are especially inviting to the stu- 
dents of music. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Physical Education of the State Normal 
College is exceptional in equipment and in the character of its in- 
structors. Courses in folk dancing, aesthetic dancing, swimming 
and games suited to all ages of children are available to Conserva- 
tory students. 






CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



235 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 



See page 85. 



COURSES IN PIANO, ORGAN OR VIOLIN 

General subjects required for all students taking the diploma 
course in piano, organ or violin. 

The diploma course in these subjects requires at least three 
years of study at the Conservatory. A more definite statement 
cannot be made, since various factors of great importance must 
jdetermine the classification of the individual student. Such fac- 
tors are: musical training previous to enrollment; talent for the 
! instrument selected; industry; health. Students must be gra- 
duates of approved high schools or must lengthen their period of 
I residence at the Conservatory so as to make up the courses lack- 
ing, in the Normal high school. 





First Year 




Second Year 

FALL 




Third Year 


1. 


Music 11 


1. 


Music 17 


1. 


Music 20 


2. 


Music 14 


2. 


Music 23 


2. 


Education 1 


3. 


French 1 


3. 


French 4 


3. 


Elective 


4. 


♦Normal Choir 




WINTER 






1. 


Music 12 


1. 


Music 18 


1. 


Music 21 


2. 


Music 15 


2. 


Music 24 


2. 


Education 2 


3. 


French 2 


3. 


French 5 


3. 


Elective 


4. 


♦Normal Choir 




SPRING 


4. 


Physics 11 


1. 


Music 13 


1. 


Music 19 


1. 


Music 22 


2. 


Music 16 


2. 


Music 25 


2. 


Education 3 


3. 


French 3 


3. 


French 6 


3. 


Elective 


4. 


♦Normal Choir 











♦Two hours each week. 



236 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Two individual lessons each week thruout the course. 
If the modern language has been taken in high school an elec- 
tive may be substituted, by conferring with the Director. 

PIANO COURSE 

The following outlines of suggestive studies and masterpieces 
in piano composition indicate the nature and range of the litera- 
ture studied: 

First Year 

Studies: Czerny op. 299; Heller op. 46. 

Sonatas: Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven op. 49, nos. 1 and 2. 

Miscellaneous Compositions: Mendelssohn: Songs without Words; 
Grieg: Papillon; Chopin: Preludes, Waltzes; Schuman: Noc- 
turne; Rubinstein: Barcarolles; Mozart: Fantasie. 

Second Year 

Studies: Czerny op. 740; Bach: Inventions. 

Sonatas: Beethoven. 

Miscellaneous Compositions: Schumann: Kinderscenen; Chopin: 
Nocturnes, Mazurkas, Etudes (if possible); Schubert: Im- 
promptus; Gluck j Brahms: Gavotte; Mendelssohn: Scherzo; 
Liszt: Liebestraume. 

Third Year 
Bach: Prelude and Fugue. 
Chopin: Etudes. 

Concertos. Mendelssohn or Beethoven. 

GRADUATING RECITALS 
PIANO 

The character of the requirements for the Graduating Recital 
is indicated by the subjoined programs. 

Miss Agnes Wardroper 

Bach Prelude and Fugue in B flat 

From Well Tempered Clavichord Book I, No. 21 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 237 

Beethoven Sonate Op. 31 No 2. 

L/argo — Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegretto 

Dal Young L'enfant qui reve fait des reves d'or 

f Golliwogg's Cake Walk 

Debussy | Et la lune descend sur le temple qui fut 

Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 3 

Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody No. 11 

Edvard Grieg Concerto, Op. 16 

Allegro moderato e marcato 

Allegro molto moderato 

Adagio 

Miss Grace W. Emery. 
J. S Bach Allegro animato 

From the Italian Concerto 
Beethoven Sonate Pathetique Op. 13. 

Grave — Allegro di molto e con brio 

Adagio cantabile 

Rondo 

Debussy Clair de lune 

Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 9 

Arensky Pres de la mer 

Friedrich Gernsheim Aeolius 

Liszt Concerto in E flat 

Allegro maestoso 

Quasi adagio 

Allegretto vivace 

Allegro marziale animato 

ORGAN 

Miss Genevieve Breining 

I. Praeludium et Fuga J, 8. Bach 

In B minor 



238 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 



II. In Paradisum Theodore Dubois 

Andante in D Alfred Hollins 

Spring Song Alfred Hollins 

III. Sonata Op. 42 Gustav Merkel 

Maestoso 
Adagio 
Introduction — Fuge 

Mrs. Ernest E. Piper 

J. 8. Bach Passacaglia 

Alfred Hollins Intermezzo 

Alfred Hollins Concert Overture 

Camille Saint-Saens Fantaisie 

Alexandre Guilm,ant Symphonie-Sonata On. 42 

Largo e maestoso — Allegro 

Pastorale 

Finale: Allegro assai — Andante Maestoso 

VIOLIN 

The Conservatory has a large class devoted to the study of the 
violin and its literature. 

As early as possible, beginners are brought together, playing in 
public first in unison and later in orchestral parts so that the 
habit of ensemble playing may be developt from the beginning 
The public recitals are very popular and are considered essential 
to the musical life of the student. Special care is devoted to the 
children's classes and many young musicians are here started in 
their careers. 

SINGING COURSE 





First Year 




Second Year 

FALL 




Third Year 


1. 


Music 1 


1. 


Music 1 


1. 


Music 20 


2. 


Music 14 


2. 


German 1 


2. 


Spanish 1 


3. 


Music 11 


3. 


French 4 


3. 


Education 1 


4. 


French 1 











CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



239 



1. Music 2 

2. Music 15 

3. Music 12 

4. French 2 



1. Music 3 

2. Music 16 

3. Music 13 

4. French 3 



WINTER 

1. Music 18 

2. 'German 2 

3. French 5 



SPRING 

1. Music 19 

2. German 3 

3. French 6 



1. Music 21 

2. Spanish 2 

3. Education 2 



1. Music 22 

2. Spanish 3 

3. Education 3 



Two individual lessons in singing each week thruout the course. 
If the modern language has been taken in high school an elec- 
tive may be substituted. 



GRADUATING RECITALS 
SINGING 

Miss Kathleen Fitzgibbon 

Classic Songs 

Mozart Voi che sapete 

Handel Care Selve 

Purcell Nymphs and Shepherds 

Aria 

Verdi Ave Maria 

From "Otello" 

Modern Songs 

Mac Dowell The robin sings in the Apple tree 

Cecil Forsyth From the Hills of Dream 

Massenet Elegie 

Bemoerg II neige 

Songs in English 

Negro Spiritual I stood on de Ribber ob Jerdon 

Scotch Leezie Lindsay 

English Mary of Allendale 

G. E. Horn I've been roaming 



240 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Miss Margaret A. Denley 

Caldara Sebben crudele 

Scarlatti O cessate di piagarmi 

Lotti Pur dicesti 

Saint-Saens Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix 

Aria from "Samson et Delila" 

„ , f Standchen 

Brahms { ^ TT . _ _. _ , . 

1 Wie Melodien 

Schubert Ave Maria 

Schumann Widmung 

Coombs * Her Rose 

Russell . , Sunset 

Burleigh \ ,. . . .Deep River 

Hammond Love's Springtime 

NORMAL CHOIR 

The Normal Choir is a chorus of two hundred mixt voices sing- 
ing under the direction of Professor Alexander. Rehearsals are 
held two evenings a week, in Pease Auditorium as follows: 

Tuesdays 6:15^7:15 iSopranos and Contraltos. 
7:15-8:16 Tenors andBasses. 

Thursdays 7-8 Full Choir. 

The repertory for the year is selected with reference to the pub- 
lic appearances of the Choir at two of the concerts in the Normal 
Concert Course and at certain functions of Commencement week. 
A varied literature of musical masterpieces is therefore studied 
thru the year consisting of alia cappella carols and old church 
pieces for the Christmas concert; modern part-songs and an ora- 
torio for the spring concert. 

Membership. — Conservatory students are required to become 
members of the Choir, the experience of ensemble singing being 
considered invaluable in developing a finely balanced musician- 
ship. Students of the College are eligible to membership. Choir 
members must prove their ability to memorize choral works, in- 
dividual tests being made after the second week in rehearsal. 
College students, who are not Conservatory students, are allowed 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 241 

one credit for faithful attendance at all rehearsals and services 
scheduled for the season. 

During the year 1919-1920 the following programs were pre- 
sented: 

March 10, 1919 

Little Masterpieces of Ecclesiastical Music from the early 

seventeenth thru the nineteenth centuries 

Choruses sung unaccompanied 

I. A Seventeenth Century Folksong, 1617 

Arranged by Carl Hirsch 
Jesus in the Garden 
II. Two Russian Liturgical Compositions 

a. Credo Gretchyaninov 

Cantor: Carl Lindgren and Choir 

b. Bless the Lord, my Soul Ippolitov-Ivanov 

III. Two Modern Hymns to the Virgin Mary 

a. French: LaVierge a la Creche Cesar Franck 

b. Italian: Ave, O Maria Riccardo Zandonai 
Sung by a small choir in unison, with piano ac- 
companiment, and with full choir responses 

IV. The Ballad of the Three Kings Peter Cornelius 

Solo — William A. Kerr 

with chorus alia cappella 

Old Musiic for the Clavichord 

1. Prelude in C J. 8. Bach 1722 

2. Soeur Monique Francois Couperin 1665-1733 

3. Gavotte Jean Phillippe Rameau 1748 
From Fete "Temple de la Gloire" 

4. Ave Maria Arkadelt 1550 

Played by Frederick Alexander 
(The clavichord is a modern reproduction, by Arnold 
Dolmetsch, of the instrument used by Bach.) 
V. Cantata: 

Sainte Marie Magdeleine Vincent D'Indy 

Soloist — Mrs. Gray 
This cantata and No. Ill, a, were sung in French; 
No. Ill b, in Italian. 

31 



242 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

VI. Finale to "'Gallia" Charles Gounod i 

Jerusalem! turn thee to the Lord thy God! 

For this program the choir was gowned in medieval Tabard 
Robes of rich reds, with appropriate head dress, designed and fur- 
nished by the costume department of the Society of Arts and 
Crafts, Detroit. The program was produced three times in De- 
troit from the stage of the Little Theatre at the Society of Arts 
and Crafts, 25 Watson Street, Friday and Saturday evenings and 
at a Saturday matinee, March 7-8, 1919. 

Fifty members of the choir gave the program at Ann Arbor, 
March 19, 19-19, at the invitation of the Matinee Musicale, singing 
from the stage of the Ann Arbor High School. 

From the Detroit Evening News, March 8, 1919. Written by 1 
Cyril Arthur Player — formerly on the editorial staff of the London 
Times : 

"The choir of women from Michigan State Normal School at* 
Ypsilanti came with a fine reputation to uphold, vindicated tradi- 
tion, and almost set a new model in concert programs. 

Scattered over the country there are a few, a very few, organi- 
zations of women who do attempt seriously to present a program 
which shall be artistically complete in setting as well as in per-j 
formance. Among these few the Ypsilanti choir ranks high; Fri- ] 
day night at the Arts and Crafts Theatre, known also as the Little 
Theatre, this excellent organization lifted a pleased audience into 
a dim, historic past, let queer monotones fall on their ears and 
did remarkable and satisfying things with the half-light of music. 

There was a dim, religious glow to the program, as well as a ca- 
thedral calm. As for the technical part of the performance, it 
needs hardly to be said that the choir lived well up to its reputa- 
tion and a little beyond; precise in attack, clear in delivery and 
enunciation, well poised, careful in phrasing, with well developed 
dramatic taste and a sense of values, a buoyant sustained quality 
and exquisite refinement of expression, these may be placed to the 
credit of Frederick Alexander's choir. ,, 

December 8, 1921 
God is with us Kastalsky 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 243 

| _ 

Cantor: Carl Lindegren 

Idoramus te Palestrina 

Gladsome Light Sullivan 

(The above three compositions were sung from the 

gallery toy the MacDowell Society from Jackson. 100 

mixed voices). 

Only Begotten Son Gretchyaninov 

Grospodi pomilui Lvovsky 

Sung in Russian 
The Shepherds Peter Cornelius 

Baritone solo by Wm. A. Kerr 
The Adoration of the Magi Peter Cornelius 

Obbligato solo by Wm. A. Kerr 
Ave Maria Arkadelt 

The Blessed Host Grieg 

Men's Voices 
lAve Maris Stella Grieg 

The Three Kings Old Spanish 

Chanson joyeuse de Noel Old French 

iChorus: 

Three excerpts from Handel's "Messiah" 
Chorus: "And the Glory of the Lord" Recit and Air: "Thus 
saith the Lord" for Basso Cantante "But who may abide" 
Chorus : Hallelujah. 
The choir for the "Messiah" numbers 450 singers: Normal 
Choir, Ypsilanti; MacDowell Society, Jackson, 100; Choristers 
from Plymouth and Wayne, 150. The Plymouth group had been 
coached by Robert Benford and the Wayne group by Carl Linde- 
gren. 

The Christmas concert had the following subsequent out of 
town engagements: 

Ann Arbor — Assembly Hall of the Michigan Union. Sunday 
matinee, Dec. 11 at 4 o'clock. 
Jackson — West Intermediate School. Dec. 13 at 8 p. m. 
Detroit — North Woodward Congregational Church. Two pro- 
ductions: 4 and 7:30 p. m., Sunday, Jan. 8, 192i2, At all these 
productions the choir sang to standing room only. 



244 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



AN APPRECIATION OF THE NORMAL CHOIR 

(iBy Leonard L. Cline, 1919-1921 Critic for Detroit (Symphony 
Orchestra, in Detroit News.) 



Not as in the case of the orchestra, the value of the chorus 
depends, almost exclusively of everything else, on the personality, 
taste and musical equipment of its conductor. A chorus of 
trained voices may sing without inspiration, without unanimity, 
without half so much real musical achievement as a chorus of j 
inferior voices under a more gifted director. An orchestra of j 
dubs would hardly be able to play at all, even under a Nikisch 
or a Richter. 

The performances of the Ypsilanti Normal Choir demonstrate 3 
that axiom most convincingly, and, by consequence, flatter the 
personality of their director. The hundred voices, selected fronL 
the transient student body of the Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege, make up the choir. Most of them are untrained, and j 
they are under Mr. Alexander's baton for only five or six 
months at most. There is a large percentage of novices 
in every year's chorus. The present choir has been in rehearsrJ 
only since October 15; yet they sing with precision and remark- 
able responsiveness; above all with the true spirit of music, joy or 
pathos or passion, which they must take from the persuasive 
personality of their leader. 

Everybody in the world has some feeling (for music. Those whc 
have volunteered to give their time and study to Mr. Alexander's 
work must have this sympathy in a degree slightly more than the 
rest. But the ordinary human being does his music as he does 
his pork chop, without nuance or abandon. And when a chorus \ 
of ordinary folk sing as this choir sings, with such ardor, suci 
verve, it indicates that in front of them is a personality capable 
of conveying to every individual some little vibration of the thril J 
he himself feels. Few conductors have that ability. 

The very palpable interest of (Mr. Alexander's choristers i* 
partly explicable by the music he chooses for them to sing. Out 
standing, on an interesting program, were the two pieces fron \ 
modern Russian liturgical music and the old French Noel. J 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 245 



Russian ecclesiastical music is as intricate as it is barbaric. 
Vhen one has stood in the gloomy vault of a Rusian cathedral, 
oluptuous with incense, and heard a native choir chanting mad 
hese strange and furious verses, one rather doubts that a chorus 
f plain Americans can ever do anything like justice to them. 
hit no choir could get more of the original intensity into this 
basic than did iMr. Alexander's chorus. The "Gospodi Pomilui," 
reird chant in which the voices glide down part by part over an 
■ctave or more, and then mount again to the point of beginning, 
aken rapidly, and just on the swift re-iteration o(£ the two words 
yas tremendously impressive. The great American sense of 
lumor might have been tickled by this extraordinary piece of 
ausic, peregrine to all the experience of our dilute services and 
epeating on and on and on the same few unmeaning syllables. 
But it was too magnificently performed to give opportunity to 
;mile. The monotony of the sharp accent on the first syllable, 
mvaried, hammeMike, had a cumulative effect that was almost 
lair-raising. And one marvelled at the ability of these singers 
o hold sustained tones at close intervals, testifying particularly 
o the painstaking manner in which they have been drilled. The 
empos, which were considerably varied, added much to the vig- 
orous effect of the music. 

For dynamics of interpretation where again the taste and 
talents of the director are concerned, the Noel was most impres- 
sive. The piece itself has the naive sweetness of French folk 
nusic; it is redolent of sunshine and the Mediterranean south of 
France and a gentle, effectionate peasantry. Mr. Alexander's 
sopranos were gentle in the caressing melody of this old song, 
and just as jubilant in the refrain. It was a very sensitive and 
lelicate piece of interpretation. The entire chorus seems to lend 
itself, with remarkable pliancy, to the least indication of the 
bonductor's hands; its attack is precise, its crescendo organ-like, 
its every nuance under immediate control. 

One little effect of costume is very gratifying. The young 
women in the chorus, dressed otherwise alike only that all their 
gowns are white, wear a sort of coif of a white transparent cloth. 
It gives a touch of vestal dignity to the ensemble. 



246 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Tuition Fees 



All fees for private lessons are payable strictly in advance. 
Payment should be made at Conservatory office. 
All lessons are given in terms of twelve weeks. 

VOICE 

Mr. Lindegren — 

One lesson per week (30 minutes) $36.00 

Mrs. Gray. 

One lesson per week (30 minutes) $24.00 

PIANO 

Mr. Breakey — 

One lesson per week (45 minutes) $30.00 

One lesson per week (1 hour) 36.00 

Two lessons per week (45 minutes) 55.00 

Miss Dickinson — 

One lesson per week (30 minutes) $24.00 

One lesson per week (40 minutes) 30.00 

One lesson per week (20 minutes) 15.00 

Miss Emery — 

One lesson per week (45 minutes) $18.00 

One lesson per week ( 1 hour) 24.00 

Children under 14 (40 minutes) 15.00 

Miss Wardroper — 

One lesson per week (45 minutes) $18.00 

One lesson per week (1 hour) 24.00 

Children under 14 (40 minutes) 15.00 

ORGAN 
I Professor Alexander — 
One lesson per week $36.00 

VIOLIN 

Edward Mosiier — 

One lesson per week $24.00 



CONSEKVATORY OF MUSIC 247 



REGULATIONS 

All bills for lessons are payable strictly in advance, at the be- 
inning of each term of 12 weeks. All terms consist of 12 weeks, 
»ut students may enter at any date, and will be charged only from 
he time of the first lesson. 

Students may begin lessons at any time, and may leave at any 
ime after 12 consecutive lessons, upon giving notice. Sickness is 
, misfortune which must be borne by the one so afflicted. For this 
eason, no deduction will be made for lessons missed by pupils, 
xcept in cases of illness so serious as to cause more than one 
veek's absence at one time from lessons, when the loss will be 
qually shared by the Conservatory and the pupil, and a propor- 
ionate amount of the money will be refunded. Lessons missed 
)y the teacher will be deducted. According to this contract teach- 
rs are not obliged to make up lessons missed by pupils. 

All matters of business connected with the Conservatory, in- 
cluding tuition, selection of teachers, courses to be taken, etc., 
nust be arranged with the Director. 

Pupils of the Conservatory are required to attend all recitals, 
vhether they take part or not, as it is for their benefit such re- 
citals are given. 

Conservatory students are required to become members of the 
formal Chorus, unless excused by the Director. 

VACATIONS. — Pupils are required to return after the end of 
iny vacation in time for the first lesson, and lessons will be 
:harged from that date. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Students of the Conservatory who have shown ability will be 
ecommended as teachers, and the Director and Faculty will use 
iheir influence in securing positions for those who desire to teach 
n to make concert or church choir engagements. 

THE ORGAN FOR PRACTICE 

The rental for the use of the organ is at the rate of $3.00 for 
>ne hour each day in the week for 12 weeks. This must be paid 
o the Secretary of the College. 



248 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

PIANOS FOR PRACTICE. 

Students are advised to bring their own pianos with them, if 
it is practicable to do so. Pianos, however, can be had in this 
city for practice at the rate of approximately $5.00 for one hour 
each day for 12 weeks, or pianos may be rented here from local 
dealers at the rate of $6.00 per month and placed in the stu- 
dent's room. 

No pianos are rented for practice in the Conservatory building. 



STUDENTS 



HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

bel, Ruby Ypsilanti 

bleson, Camilla Ypsilanti 

belson, Donna Ypsilanti 

|lban, Lloyd Ypsilanti 

mold, Charles Denton 

mold, Seth Denton 

aeon, F. D Mason 

aken, Roy Ypsilanti 

eal, Verneita Ypsilanti 

eebe, Olive Ypsilanti 

ennett, Margaret Ypsilanti 

jeuschlein, Lenora Ypsilanti 

jiddle, Aileen Ypsilanti 

liddle. Dayle Ypsilanti 

addle, Marion Ypsilanti 

jlock, Clarence : . Ypsilanti 

lossey, Selma Belleville 

opp, Betty Lansing 

ortz, Helena Ypsilanti 

ray, Lotta Lee, Mrs Dearborn 

ritton, Harper D Ypsilanti 

rown, Francis Inkster 

urrell, James Ypsilanti 

amp, Martha Ann Arbor 

ampbell, Edward , Ypsilanti 

ampbell, Iva Ypsilanti 

ampbell, Jeanette Ypsilanti 

arey, Nellie E Ypsilanti 

haffers, O'Leary Inkster 

lark, Emily Belleville 

lark, Gerald Ypsilanti 



250 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Clark, Vera Ypsilan 

Combs, Jeanette Ypsilan 

Conant, Herbert Dent< 

Cook, Paul Ypsilan 

Corn well, Cecil H Ypsilan 

Crippen, Cleon Ann Arb 

Crittenden, Glenn Salii] 

Curry, Helen Ypsilan j 

Dailey, Marie M Ypsilan* 

Darling, Theodore Ann Arfo; 

Davis, Irene Ypsilan \ 

Dicks, Alma Bellevil; 

Dicks, Gilbert Bellevill 

Dingleday, Clara Plymoui ' 

Drake, Fannie * Ypsilan 5 

Duncan, Bessie Detrc 

Ealy, Esther Ypsilan 

Elder, Charles Ypsilan 

Everetts, Josephine Ypsilan 

Farland, B. Farquharson, Mrs Dearboi 

Farrish, Glenn Ypsilan 

Foerster, Anna Ypsilan 

Foerster, Myrtle Ypsilan 

Foerster, Mildred Ypsilan 

Fogarty, Edward Dentc 

Foster, Dwight Ypsilan 

Foster, Helen Ypsilan 

Foster, Marion Ypsilan 

Freeman, Josephine Ypsilan 

Fuller, Ronald Ypsilan 

Gardner, Aaron K Ypsilan 

Gardner, Mrs. Elda Ypsilan 

Gee, Florence Ypsilan 

( JJc.Lson, Ellen Emme 

Goodheu, Alfred Ann Arb< 

Gotts, Earl Ypsilan 

Gotts, Margaret Ypsilan 

Gjant, Margaret Sault Ste. Mar 

i [ague, Mary Jacksc 



STUDENTS 251 



•fall, John Ann Arbor 

j'ammer, Louis Reed City 

;.'ankinson, Beulah Ypsilanti 

;."arris, Augusta Dansville, 111. 

iarris, Muriel . Ypsilanti 

larris, Walter Ypsilanti 

latch, Robert Ypsilanti 

|[atch, William Ypsilanti 

tathaway, Carol Ypsilanti 

irathaway, Kenneth Ypsilanti 

fathaway, William Ypsilanti 

[ebblewhite, Marshall Ypsilanti 

[eininger, LaVern Ypsilanti 

[errst, Henry Ypsilanti 

[errst, Julia Ypsilanti 

[ixson, Fred Ypsilanti 

lolly, Helen Ypsilanti 

fopkins, Olive Stockbridge 

louse, James Ypsilanti 

[oxie, Jefferson Ypsilanti 

rubble, Marjorie Ypsilanti 

luston, Earl Ypsilanti 

luston, Gladys Ypsilanti 

luston, Lucille Ypsilanti 

rwin, Vera Ypsilanti 

ameson, Lavonna Ypsilanti 

ewell, Donadee Plymouth 

ewell, Pearl Milan 

laufman, Harry Ypsilanti 

Ciddoo, Harold . • Creston, Iowa 

Cincaid, Bernice Ypsilanti 

Cnapp, Norwood J Ypsilanti 

Cnight, Clarence Ypsilanti 

vurr, Emerson Ypsilanti 

.adner, Muriel Ypsilanti 

.andy, Carlyle Ann Arbor 

jewis, Selma Almont 

idke, George , . . . . Denton 

lister, Frances Ypsilanti 



252 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Lister, William Ypsilant 

Lovell, Lucy Ypsilant 

Manchester,. Holmes Ypsilant 

Manchester, Thelma Ypsilant 

Marquart, Frank Ypsilant 

McComb, Russell ' Fentor 

McCraight, Maude Ypsilant 

McKenna, Loren Ypsilant 

McKenny, Marion Ypsilant 

McNeill, Bonnie Ypsilant 

Metcalf, Joseph Ypsilant 

Meyers, William Dentoi 

Mohler, Orren Ypsilant 

Moore, Jessie Ypsilant 

Moore, Nina Ypsilant 

Moore, Willard Ypsilant 

Morris, Willard Ypsilant' 

Mott, Marion Dentoi I 

Mott, Maynard Dentco 

Mullen, James Detroi 

Muller, Pauline Ypsilant 

Muller, Ruth Ypsilant I 

Mumford, Flora Ypsilant 

Munger, Louise Ypsilant 

Nordman, Frank Ann Arbo 

Nordman, Henry Ann Arbo 

Norris, Mary New Carlisle, Inc 

Paine, John G., Jr Yspilant 

Palmer, Glenn Ypsilanl 

Peck, Frank Ypsilant 

Peet, Gilbert Ypsilant 

Proctor, Francis Canto 

Rail, Florence D Toledo, Ohi 

Randall, Floyd Dento 

Rash, Ralph Ann Arb< 

Raymo, El he] Ypsilan 

Riley, Edward Ypsilan 

Rohman, Esther Cincinnati, < 

Rooker, Ada Ypsilan 



STUDENTS 253 



loss, Paul Ypsilanti 

|toss, Reid Ypsilanti 

oth, Alfred Ypsilanti 

■fee, Arloa Plymouth 

U)we, Margaret Plymouth 

vowe, Milton Plymouth 

tubert, Gladys Ypsilanti 

Ichlicht, Edna Denton 

ichneider, Ruth E Washington 

Ichwcier, Marcita . . ., Carleton 

Ihaeffer, Fern Chciago, 111. 

Jhuart, Bernice Ypsilanti 

Jhawley, Laura Ypsilanti 

>immonds, Theone Ypsilanti 

Simmons, George Ypsilanti 

Minms, Harold Detroit 

Smith, William Denton 

Miow, Margaret c Ypsilanti 

Spense, William Ypsilanti 

3taebler, Lena E., Mrs Ypsilanti 

>turton, Allen Ypsilanti 

3iisterka, Miladi Belleville 

Thayer, Ralph Ypsilanti 

Titus, Manley Ypsilanti 

Townsend, Beatrice Ypsilanti 

Trimble, Eloise Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, James - Wayne 

Trucsdell, Louis Wayne 

Van Emery, Milfred Ypsilanti 

Voelker, Helen '. Ann Arbor 

Voorheis, Rachael : Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Allison Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Georgina : Ypsilanti 

Wallace, Samuel Ypsilanti 

Walters, Lloyd Ypsilanti 

Waters, Gertrude Ypsilanti 

Waters, Stanley Ypsilanti 

Webb, James Ypsilanti 

Wells, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 



254 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wiard, Lyman Ypsilant 

Wilkinson, Lloyd Charlotte 

Willard, Jcanette Ypsilant 

Winsor, Grace Cantor 

Winsor, Ruth Cantor 

Woodward, Susie Ypsilant 

Wright, Lenore Plymoutl 

Yeckley, Jack Ypsilant 



FIRST YEAR 

Abbott, Frances A Cass Citj 

Acker, Evelyn Marguerite Chelsea 

Ackerman, John T Flhr 

Addington, Sara Central Lake 

Akans, Lillian Lucile Inksta 

Akins, Dollie E Croswel 

Alber, Florence Lorene Ann Arbo] 

Allen, Georgiana Fostork 

Allen, Gerard Milar 

Aller, Lucile Edon, Ohi<; 

Alyea, Ivro H Trentor 

Amerman, Alton Belleville 

Anderson, Carrie E Jerome 

Anderson, Stanley E Birminghan 

Appold, Edgar Sebewain^ 

Arkin, Ida Detroit 

Arms, Aroline C Gainer 

Armstrong, Nora K Detroit 

Arndt, Edith Imlay City 

Augustus, Mildred E Ypsilant 

Augustus, Raymond S Ypsilant 

Austin, Delphine Laingsburg 

Austin, Justus Dearborr 

Axford, Marie G Rochestei 

Bacon, Ruth St. Louis 

Baker, Donna Ypsilanti 

Baldrige, Niles Coldwatei 



STUDENTS 255 



our, Thelma C Kinde 

ber, Charlotte Waldron 

3Jdwell, Irene Cass City 

3;nes, Ardath C Tawas City 

3nes, Beatrice Z Berville 

3ines, Mrs. Elsie Ypsilanti 

3 nes, Helen M Horton 

3 r, Dorothy Muskegon 

3,!tholomew, Lucille Niles 

3.jtle, Bertha Brown City 

3iCon, Cecile Bath 

es, Edith M Mancelona 

es, Mildred A Grayling 

ch, A. L Ypsilanti 

1, Alice J Ypsilanti 

le, Mabel L Holt 

rdslee, Evelyn E Laingsburg 

,rss, Lila J Bailey 

ttie, Nancy E Ionia 

Bangie, Nina Viola Calumet 

Bjl, Mrs. Helena E Ypsilanti 

B you, Zola R Fenwick 

Bjmett, Beulah B Onekama 

Bjmett, Dolly Holly 

Biinett, Florence Bessemer 

B itley, Maxine Lum 

Bjgin, Fred J Ypsilanti 

Hry, Robert W Ann Arbor 

B|trand, Allan . . . Oscoda 

Brschlag, Emily St. Clair 

B|kford, Fern Coldwater 

Btelow, Mabel A Williamston 

Bid, Orson Wayne 

Bihop, Reva M Ypsilanti 

Bjnkertz, Julius Dearborn 

Bjomfield, Esther C . Laingsburg 

Bjey, Louise L Addison 

Burner, Ada M Ypsilanti 

Ebmgarden, Ruth Toledo, Ohio 



256 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Bopp, Betty Lansln S 

Borgerson, Hazel V Lowel l 

Born, Geraldine U Rockland 

Boss, Marie E Sand Lake 

Botsford, Lucille Ann Arbor 

Boughner, Glenna Lansing 

Bouldrey, LaVerne ^ oncwd 

Boulton, Marion Fostona 

Bourke, Catherine Agnes Columbus 

Boutell, Evelyn G , Y P s J an " 

Boynton, Beatrice B • • • • • lollla 

Boynton, Florence L /^T 

Brace, Dorothy M Grand Led* 

Bracey, Lynford • • ba ™ 

Brackenbury, Eva ° ass ut; 

Bradford, Elma M Sa S lnOT 

Brandell, Edward J m'Tp' 

Brandes, Margaret Mat Koo 

Bray, Mrs. Lotta Lee Uearbor; 

Breitmayer, Thelma .^ . Jackso 

Bristol, Norma M. R «f al 0a 

Brotherton, Olive • • E f anab 

Brown, Elizabeth • • Fort ™? 

_ „, • Traverse Oit 

Brown, Flossie ^^ 

Brown, Frederick • ' " 

_ ' „ , Mancelon 

Brown, Gordon 

„ t • n Mancelon 

Brown, Larnie C _,. 

„ »» • i Brown Oil 

Brown, Muriel ,. 

Brundage, Mildred M ■ • ■ ™ 

f, , Brown Oil 

Bryce, Myrle . Calum 

Bryant Luclla Joy ' .Howard Ci 

Buck Lucille ■ Romu l 

Bunnell, Sherman L 

" m[l ;";' >TVc :.'.'. Harbor Sprin 

Burdett, Robert C y 

Burg, Irene ()vw 

Burgeffl.Amy Z'.'.'.JonS* 

Butler, Mildred L ^ 

Button, Clara I 



STUDENTS 257 



Butzer, Ella M Montague 

Cadaret, Alice Dundee 

Cairns, J. Paul .' Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Califf, D. G Ypsilanti 

Campbell, Byron M Ann Arbor 

Campbell, Catharine Belleville 

Canfield, Helen St. Clair 

Canfield, J. C t Rocky River, O. 

Capron, Frances Frankfort 

Carley, Elsa , Munith 

Carpenter, Freda J Port Clinton, O. 

Carpenter, Ralph E Wayne 

Carter, Anna Belle Bronson 

Carter, Laura Jackson 

Carter, Lenora Concord 

Cash, Ruby Marshall 

Casler, Frances Ann Arbor 

Casler, Kathryn H Ann Arbor 

Cassedy, Clara E Ortonville 

Ceretto, Mary Victoria Calumet 

Chaddock, Esther Ypsilanti 

Challis, Grace Ypsilanti 

Challis, Jennie ...... South Lyon 

Champion, Zaidee H Iron River 

Chapman, Helen E Grand Rapids 

Chase, Hah M Traverse City 

Chase, R. Veda Boyne City 

Cheney, Lucille P Fowlerville 

Christopher, Louise K r Fruitport 

Clara, Cora Gagetown 

Clark, E. Arlene Ypsilanti 

Clark, Harry W Britton 

Clawson, Maude M Allegan 

Clise, E. Elaine Ithaca 

Coash, J. Blanche Saginaw 

Cobb, Mary E Escanaba 

Cochrane, Robert E Jackson 

Cody, Catherine L Ann Arbor 

Colburn, Charles W Medina, N. Y. 

33 



258 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Cole, Wilma A Ann Arbor 

Colville, Winifred M Port Huron 

Colwell, Ray S Cass City 

Comloquoy, Beatrice M Boyne City 

Conlin, Grace St. Clair 

Cook, Thelma I Stockbrdige 

Coon, Leona Croswell 

Cooney, Dorothy B Camden 

Cooper, Bernice Frankfort 

Corey, Elmer M Ionia 

Cornell, Beryl Mae Harbor Springs 

Cornwell, Stella Greenville 

Cox, Josephine Concord 

Coxford, Arthur F Douglas 

Coy, Faye Adrian 

Crawford, Charlotte Free Soil 

Crawford, Dorothy Catherine Jackson 

Crumb, Florence Walled Lake 

Cumings, Florence Grand Rapids 

Cunningham, Genevieve Dexter 

Cunningham, Gertrude Morrice 

Cunningham, Helen G Huron, Ohio 

Curtis, Margaret Cadillac 

Cutler, Amber Flint 

Dahlberg, Hildur Escanaba 

D'Anjou, Irene Boyne City 

Davidson, Ferol Owosso 

Davidson, Francis Mancelona 

Davis, George H Crestline, 0. 

Dean, Constance Cleveland, Ohio 

Dear, Mrs. Iva I Birmingham 

Decker, Earl L Colon 

Deer, Mrs. Mayme Birmingham 

Delaney, Fern Davison 

Demaree, Elizabeth Claypool, Ind. 

Densmore, Georgia Alice St. Ignace 

J tares, Anna G St. Clair 

Dibble, Frances Highland Park 

Dickie, Malcolm Pontiac 



STUDENTS 259 



Dillon, Harold Grand Rapids 

Dittman, Nora Drydcn 

Dobbins, Jesse W Ypsilanti 

Dodge, Frank E Cass City 

Donaldson, Winifred Belle Milford 

Doneen, Mildred Gayle Rives Junction 

Do(y, Carol L Holloway 

Dow, F. Nelva Sunfield 

Dowd, Eleanor M. Grand Rapids 

Downey, Gertrude C Laurium 

Draper, Donald M Milan 

Drury, Helen I Britton 

Drury, Marsh Britton 

Dunlap, Mabel Irene Staranac 

Dunning, Ruth E Howell 

Duprey, Marie Van Wert, Ohio 

Earl, A. Flossa Ypsilanti 

Eberle, Merney A Houghton 

Eddie, J. C Ann Arbor 

Ederer, Alphons Monroe 

Edgerton, Harris D Petoskey 

Edwards, Nellie Falmouth 

Eljman, Winifred Beulah 

Eichhorn, Anne Bay City 

Elgas, Minnie M Cadillac 

Elliott, Mrytle Escanaba 

Ellis, Florence M Benzonia 

Ellis, Frances E Midland 

Emens, Winifred Prattville 

Empkie, Hildegarde M Port Austin 

Engel, Ernest T Adrian 

Evans, Ambrosia Millington 

Everill, Winifred Algonac 

Fairman, Florence Big Rapids 

Farrish, Ethel Ypsilanti 

Fast, Theressa K Montgomery 

Fenner, Ruth St. Louis 

Ferguson, Marie H Ypsilanti 

Fesing, Helen C Chassell 



260 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Field, Esther Wilhelmina Ypsilanti 

Fields, Gladys Fowlerville 

Fineberg, Helen Highland Park 

Finlan, C. H Fowlerville 

Finley, Charles E Albion 

Fish, Hazel Colling 

Fishbeck, Winifred Ann Arbor 

Fisk, Marjory E Ypsilanti 

Fitzgerald, Florence Richmond 

Fitzgerald, Maree Richmond 

Fitzgerald, Zada B Thompson 

Fleming, Iva L Scottville 

Foster, Alex '. Brown City 

Foster, Earl D Capac 

Fowler, Angela Marion Pontiac 

Fowler, Lucile E Hollo way 

Fox, Lilian M Port Huron 

Fox, Margaret Sparta 

Fox, Zelma Charlotte 

Francis, John R Croswell 

Frayer, Doris M Deerfield 

Freeman, Emily Plymouth 

Freeman, Gladys Plymouth 

Freeman, Lynn Owen Denton 

French, Paul P West Branch 

Freund, Lenore West McHenry, 111. 

Fried, Dorothy Grace Saginaw 

Fuller, S. Grace Sault Ste. Marie 

Fuller, Mildred M Springport 

Fouss, Hazel M Saline 

Furniss, Jennett Nashville 

Fyf e, Leonard W Birmingham 

Gage, June Saginaw 

Galley, Miriam Ypsilanti 

Garbutt, Edith Amadore 

Gardner, Aaron K Ypsilanti 

Garner, Olive S Davisburg 

Gates, Gertrude Jackson 

Gatz, Elizabeth J Mt. Clemens 



STUDENTS 261 



Gaylord, Ruth M Hillsdale 

Geary, Forrest Parma 

Gebhardt, Helen P. . . . Cheboygan 

Geissler, Margaret Detroit 

Geney, Ruth M Corunna 

Gerick, Gertrude Denton 

Gibbs, Pearl F Whitehall 

Gibson, Grace , Belleville 

Giddings, Eva Gail North Adams 

Gillespie, Colonel E Ann Arbor 

Gilman, Florence R Petoskey 

Gladden, Marguerite Lansing 

Glass, Dorothy M Saginaw 

Gleason, Thomas E Emmet 

Glover, Mabelle Fowlerville 

Glover, Paul O Ypsilanti 

Glover, H. Willis Ypsilanti 

Goff, Etta E Olivet 

Goodar, Francis C Richmond 

Goodrich, Ottly Pontiac 

Gordon, Frank C Holly 

Gorton, Eugene Ypsilanti 

Gough, Harry Yale 

Gourley, William J Ypsilanti 

Gramer, Anita G Chelsea 

Grant, Mabel Oscoda 

Green, Norma Holly 

Greene, Hazel A Goodells 

Greene, Lenna Petoskey 

Greiner, Mary Pinckney 

Greiner, Zora May Hanover 

Griggs, Ruth Saginaw 

Grimes, Myrlan Dansville 

Grissel, George H Wayne 

Groves, Floyd A Birmingham 

Gustafson, Melba L St. Ignace 

Guzman, Sara . Mayaguez, Porto Rico 

Hadden, Bessie Romeo 

Hagle, Ruth Almont 



262 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hague, Carolyn Jackson 

Hale, Gertrude Portland 

Hale, Morris P Hudson 

Hale, Reatha C Owosso 

Hall, Leanor M Laurium 

Hallett, Mildred Franklin, Pa. 

Halonen, Mary South Range 

Hamilton, Lois R Detroit 

Hammar, Olga E Tustin 

Hanna, Helen Lucille Lima, Ohio 

Hansen, Carmen N Ludington 

Hansen, Maxine M Charlevoix 

Harding, Elizabeth Ann Arbor 

Harford, Mildred Wixom 

Harmon, Ervenia Lansing 

Harper, Donna Evart 

Harrington, Dorothy Parma 

Harris, Althea O Pinconning 

Harris, Leila Gwen Lansing 

Harris, Lucille Owosso 

Harris, Raymond Pinckney 

Hart, Sybil Flushing 

Hartom, Rollin A Saginaw 

Haselschwerdt, Mae Grass Lake 

Hathaway, Anne Sparta 

Hatter, Clyde O Azalia 

Hawley, Barbara Jackson 

Hayes, William George Ypsilanti 

Hebestreit, Hilda M Brighton 

Heilig, Alice G Palms 

Heilig, Viola Mae Palms 

Helm, Rosalie Vermontville 

Helrnka, Grayce E Sparta 

Hendrick, Margaret L Grand Ledge 

Hendrickson, Mary E Ann Arbor 

Hendrickson, Virginia Ann Arbor 

Herrick, Mildred South Lyon 

I \< ey, Leona M Grand Rapids 

Heydlauff, Elsie M Grass Lake 



STUDENTS 263 



Heyman, Edward Port Sanilac 

Hibbs, Cleon Ypsilanti 

Hicks, Justine Pontiac 

Higgins, Mrs. Lotta Vermontville 

Hilton, Minnie M. . . . Grass Lake 

Hiscock, Florence Ypsilanti 

Hiscock, Gertrude Ypsilanti 

Hobbs, Catherine Traverse City 

Hodgman, Louise M Lyons 

Hoffman, Mary Pearle Flint 

Holland, Lucille V Iron Mountain 

Holloway, Dorothy Weston 

Holmes, Glyn N Ypsilanti 

Holmes, Ruth E Woodland 

Hoops, Frank E Wayne 

Hopkins, Edna Denton 

Horning, Hazle Bernice Flushing 

Horrigan, Nellie E Flint 

Horton, Lois Ellen Albion 

Horton, Tracy C. . Fowlerville 

House, Lucile Fowlerville 

Howard, John A Ann Arbor 

Howell, Hazel Port Huron 

Hubbard, Helen M Concord 

Hubbard, Helen Vee Wayne 

Hudson, Alice E Marlette 

Hudson, Corinne E Eaton Rapids 

Huebner, Alma I Mount Clemens 

Huebner, Mildred Mount Clemens 

Hughes, Alice C Imlay City 

Hull, Marie Jackson 

Hulliberger, Faye Dansville 

Humphrey, Alice Lorraine Ionia 

Humphrey, Mary E Thompsonville 

Humphrey, Tryphena Thompsonville 

Hunt, Clifford Birmingham 

Hunt, Maurice E. . , Sault Ste. Marie 

Hunt, Milda Marine City 

Hunt, Thelma Cass City 



264 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hutchings, Clara A Denton 

Hutchings, Margaret F Charlotte 

Huyck, A. S Carson City 

Inglesh, Gladys Barton City 

Irish, Esther Pontiac 

Jackson, Anna Belle Whitehall 

Jackson, Dorothy F Dearborn 

Jacobson, Dorothy Port Clinton, Ohio 

Jeannot, Frances E Muskegon 

Jefferson, H. W Jackson 

Jibson, LaVinna Fremont 

Johnson, Hazel Adrian 

Johnson, Henry T Ypsilanti 

Johnson, Minnie Saranac 

Jonas, Christine Capac 

Jones, Mavis Vickery ville 

Jorae, Alice A Ovid 

Jordan, Charles H New Castle, Pa. 

Juckette, Lola Homer 

Judd, Lyle L Ypsilanti 

Keefer, Gayla Lyons 

Kellett, Frances Ironwood 

Kelly, Mary Naomi Clifford 

Kenyon, Roxanna West Branch 

Kerby, Frederick J Grosse Pointe 

Kern, Howard A Ypsilanti 

Kerr, Dorothy V. Alden 

Kerr, Phoebe C Owendale 

Kieppe, Ada Mason 

King, Alene Davisburg 

King, Gertrude H Cleveland, Ohio 

Kitti, Lila Calumet 

Kitto, Winifred A Charlotte 

Kline, Anna M Jackson 

Kline, Morton Plainfield, N. J. 

Knight, Thelma I\I Hanover 

Knowles, Majorgia North Adams 

Knox, Moms Ypsilanti 

Koenig, Otto G., .Jr.. St. Louis, Mo, 



STUDENTS 265 



Komarosky, Belle A Gary, Indiana 

Koppers, Marie Grand Rapids 

Korzuck, Leona Ann Arbor 

Kosinska, Eugenia Detroit 

Kositchek, Mariam Lansing 

Koski, Felix Beacon 

Krebs, Jas. J New Boston 

Krempel, Mildred Manistee 

Kurtz, Hazel L Metamora 

Lackie, Gladys Ypsilanti 

Lahser, Dorothy E Redford 

Lahser, Evelyn E Redford 

Laidlaw, Winona Ludington 

Lake, Ava M Linden 

Lamb, Velma Vermontville 

Lang, Carolyn River Rouge 

Lardie, Lillian A Old Mission 

Larke, Muriel B Sault Ste. Marie 

Larson, Walter Dearborn 

Lawless, Katherine Lyons 

Lawrence, J. Don Ypsilanti 

Lawther, Mary Dearborn 

Layton, Dollie E Hanover 

Leary, Phyllis Patricia Hancock 

LeFurge, Eva Irene Lansing 

Lehman, Florence Pontiac 

Lemen, Mildred V Dexter 

Lennington, Horatio Maybee 

Lennon, Margaret Fowlerville 

Lepley, Myrtle L Cameron, Wisconsin 

Lewis, Katharine Muskegon 

Lewis, Mary Ellen Reading 

Lewis, Mary Helen Ypsilanti 

Lietz, Meta H East Tawas 

Lindberg, Signey Gladstone 

Lindon, Alma M Richmond 

Link, Marion L Sandusky 

Linton, D. Enid Homer 

Lippert, Gertrude Owosso 



266 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Lister, Mary Ellen Clare 

Litchard, Alma St. Ignace 

Locke, Marjorie Louise Port Huron 

Logan, Bernice L Deerfield 

Logan, Reba Ousted 

Long, Alice Elizabeth Elkhart, Indiana 

Long, Doris L Deerfield 

Looney, Howard C Birmingham 

Loose, Clifford Coldwater 

Lord, Luette R Jackson 

Lowe, Emma H Britton 

Lumley, Albert E Utica 

Lunger, Florence M Utica 

Lurkins, Max C Ypsilanti 

Luscombe, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Lutey, Florence Ishpeming 

Lyke, Lillian L Northville 

Lynch, Donna G. A North Adams 

Lynch, Harry A Detroit 

Lyndon, Marjorie Dexter 

Lynn, Adaline Muskegon 

Lytle, Howard Gladwin 

Mack, Agnes H N. Kingsville, Ohio 

Madison, Helen St. Ignace 

Mahon, Elizabeth Iron River 

Major, Rose. Fenton 

Manning, Marjorie L ' Grand Rapids 

Marion, Beulah Marie Brown City 

Manion, Imogene Alpena 

Markey, Beatrice Saginaw 

Markham, Harrie B Holland 

Marquart, F Detroit 

Marshall, Marian J Jackson 

Marshall, Pearl Cass City 

Marshall, Ruby Cass City 

Martin, Jennie P Manchester 

Marx, Carl B Saginaw 

Matheison, Clele Jcddo 

Maxwell, Lynn Onsted 



STUDENTS 267 



McAllister, Ruth Saline 

iMcAlpine, Blanche Fairgrove 

JMcArthur, Agnes Louise Delta, Ohio 

MacArthur, Gladys Rogers 

iMcCardle, Nora Jeddo 

I McCarthy, Gladys Muskegon 

i McCauley, Helen Richmond 

McCauley, Ruth Richmond 

I McCloskey, Francis L Pinckney 

i McCormack, Alta L Otter Lake 

McCormack, Marguerite Laurium 

McCormack, Ruth E Otter Lake 

McCourtie, Winafred Cement City 

McCoy, Marcele Van Wert, Ohio 

McCulloch, Queen Detroit 

MacDonald, Crescence E Lake Linden 

MacDonald, Olive Deckerville 

McEldowney, Ida Ruth Caro 

McGreery, Anna S Detroit 

McGuirk, Margaret Muskegon 

McHenney, Mary Clinton 

Mcintosh, Myrtle A Millersburg 

Mcintosh, Olive L Port Huron 

Mclntyre, Doris A Charlotte 

Mclntyre, M. Mildred Adrian 

McKinnon, Helen Bay City 

McLean, Archie Applegate 

McLellan, Ila Croswell 

McNaughton, Ralph K Applegate 

McNeven, M. Lucile Romeo 

MacNitt, Reginald D Ann Arbor 

MacRae, Christie Cass City 

Meade, Kenneth A Nashville 

Mears, M. Myrle Stockbridge 

Meeker, Donna Sparta 

Methven, Ray S Croswell 

Metzler, Merle K Saginaw 

Meyer, Garnet R Grant 

Mikkelsen, Mabel E Montague 



268 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Miller, Alton A Flint 

Miller, Mabel Catherine Grand Marais 

Miller, Raymond V Richmond, Indiana 

Mills, Ruth Fremont 

Mitchell, Emeline M Birmingham 

Mitchell, Gladys Dansville 

Mitchell, Zelma Montgomery 

Monagin, Lura Brooklyn 

Moore, Lucile E Sault Ste. Marie 

Moore, Mary B Ann Arbor 

Morris, Mary Etta Saline 

Morton, Anna Mae Ann Arbor 

Morton, Edith Ann Arbor - 

Morton, W. S Ann Arbor 

Mosher, Edward D Centerville 

Mowery, Oliver Ecorse 

Mulchahey, Helen H Ray, Indiana 

Mundell, Opal E . . . - Fowler 

Murphy, Ann E Mt. Morris 

Murphy, Mary L Mt. Morris 

Murphy, Viola B Holton 

Musser, Dorothy Pauline Ortonville 

Myers, Dessie Osseo 

Myers, Marjorie Charlevoix 

Myers, Paul William Portland, Me. 

Nelson, Florence A Dollar Bay 

Nester, Coline Detroit 

Neville, Kathleen Gladstone 

Newton, Geraldine I Ypsilanti 

Nichols, Florence Fremont 

Nichols, Rolland Reading 

Nicolai, Esther S. B Adrian 

Nicthammer, Lorcna Dansville 

Niles, Ruth E Ypsilanti 

Nissly, Ronald L Ypsilanti 

Noble, Juunita Milan 

Nollar, Ruth Dearborn 

Norri.s, Katharine Louise Jackson 

North, Celia A Lansing 



STUDENTS 269 



North, Marion Lansing 

Nowlin, Gladys Roscommon 

Nugent, Beatrice L Willis 

Nunn, Alta Prescott 

Nuttall, Gladys V Twining 

Obenauer, Edwina Olivet 

O'Brien, Kathryn A Bay City 

Och, Hortense LaVone Cheboygan 

Ocker, Margaret E Empire 

O'Donnell, Helen Whiting, Indiana 

O'Harrow, Beatrice Lowell 

O'Harrow, Doris Lowell 

O'Leski, Edward J Lansing 

Oliver, Ethel Farmington 

Oppermann, Doris Saginaw 

Osgood, Susan Monroe 

Ostrander, Ivah Edith South Bend, Indiana 

Otterbein, Arthur Elkton 

Overton, Gertrude H Manistique 

Paine, Helen Hancock 

Parent, Dorothy Redford 

Parker, Mildred V Ann Arbor 

Parmelee, Genevieve Spring Arbor 

Paton, Mauricee C Almont 

Patton, Mildred L Lima, Ohio 

Payne, Grace Ethel Battle Creek 

Pearce, Mary Jane Bad Axe 

Peck, Mildred J Ypsilanti 

Peel, Robert L Ann Arbor 

Perkins, Esther Margaret Lake Odessa 

Perrine, Austin W Ypsilanti 

Perrine, Rolland E Ypsilanti 

Perry, Robert L Denton 

Perry, Ruth C Davison 

Peterson, Edna M Galesburg, Illinois 

Peterson, Helen A Ludington 

Peterson, Merle Brooklyn 

Pettit, Helen Jackson 

Phinney, Dorothy Lorain, Ohio 



270 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAS BOOK 






Pickles, Charlotte Detroit 

Pierson, Helen M Sturgis 

Piggott, Marion Fowler 

Pinson, Margaret R Portsmouth, Ohio 

Plaga, Violet I Saginaw 

Plimpton, Beatrice E Ann Arbor 

Pointer, Etta M Dearborn 

Popp, Florence Provemont 

Post, Athelia . Lansing 

Post, Ruah L Mulliken 

Potts, Irene J Peck 

Powell, Gladys Highland Park 

Powell, Lydia C Empire 

Powell, Winifred H Port Huron 

Pray, Percy R Detroit 

Preston, Lilah Britton 

Preston, Marion Battle Creek 

Priehs, Alice Imlay City 

Priestley, Leora Hope Brighton 

Prosser, Harold A. Flint 

Pruden, Avis C Deerfield 

Pugsley, Sarah Battle Creek 

Quilhot, Cleah Pittsford 

Raddatz, Grace A Fowlerville 

Randall, Pearl Howell 

Rasmussen, Agnes Truf ant 

Rattenbury, A. Ilene Plymouth 

Ratti, Celestine M Ann Arbor 

Reed, Anna A Lansing 

Reed, Bernice E Lake Odessa 

Reed, Dorothy M Petoskey 

Reese, Goldeen Lansing 

Regan, Angela M Brown City 

Reh, Violet E Mount Clemens 

Reid, Florence G, Ypsilanti 

Reiser, Rosemond Wayne 

Renton, Florence M Belleville 

Richardson, Marion Ypsilanti 

Riehert, Barbara R Bay City 



STUDENTS 271 



Richmond, Ernest Stuart Ann Arbor 

Riley, Helen E , Corunna 

Riley, Lois Genevieve Flint 

Ringle, Myrna L Ithaca 

Ritter, Florence . Huron, Ohio 

Roat, Marguerite N Flint 

Roberts, Florence M Dexter 

Roberts, George Walter Ypsilanti 

Roberts, Harold A Ypsilanti 

Robinson, Floyd R Lyons, Ohio 

Rockwell, F. A Ann Arbor 

Roe, Iila Mae Plymouth 

Rogers, Caroline Bacon Pontiac 

Rogers, Josephine Ola Pontiac 

Rooker, Ada Ypsilanti 

Rorabacker, Helen T Plymouth 

Rose, Wm. Ray Morenci 

Rosentreter, Martha New York City 

Ross, Doris Ypsilanti 

Ross, Hazel Saginaw 

Ross, Laura E Rochester 

Ross, Marion Ypsilanti 

Ross, Rozziglind Hansen Manistee 

Rossman, Lillie Mae Kingston 

Roth, Armin A Ypsilanti 

Roth, Walter E Ypsilanti 

Rowley, Helen May Geneva, N. Y. 

Rubert, Gladys Farmington 

Rudloff, Wave Campbell Homer 

Ruh, Howard Yale 

Rumsey, Ozelma M Dimondale 

Sabourin, Albert J Alpena 

Sailing, Louise M Grayling 

Sanregret, Beatrice C '. L'Anse 

Savage, Esther J Belleville 

Sayles, Blanche Montague E. Lansing 

Scharer, Geneva Toledo, Ohio 

Scheffler, Cora Grace Owosso 

Schilds, Lois Grand Ledge 



272 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Schilling, Pearl Hilda Hillsdale 

Schlicher, Lee R Laingsburg 

Schmagner, Elizabeth Hurley, Wisconsin 

Schramm, Margaret W Bridgeport, Ohio 

Schumacher, Oscar F Ann Arbor 

Schwab, Martha K Holloway 

Scribner, M. Julia Rochester 

Schudlark, Estelle Dearborn 

Seaver, Irene M Flint 

Seaver, Ruth K Ypsilanti 

Selker, Esther Cleveland 

Sells, G. Lester Detroit 

Sepplan, Inez Betty Ironwood 

Sevener, Ruth J Flint 

Shaeffer, Fern Leslie Chicago, 111. 

Shaffer, Mary M Van Wert, 0. 

Shaffmaster, Thelma E Bronson 

Shannon, Ina M Brighton 

Sharpe, Clifford A Stockbridge 

Shepard, D. Ruth Portland 

Sherwood, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Short, L. E South Lyon 

Signor, Wales Wilson Ypsilanti 

Simmons, Dorothy Richmond 

Simmons, Irene Ann Arbor 

Simon, Edwin L Ann Arbor 

Simpson, Mrs. Adah Lansing 

Singleton, William Harvey Detroit 

Skimin, Doris Saginaw 

Slade, Evelyne Ironwood 

Slee, Dorothy E Onsted 

Slocum, Grace M Gaines 

Smith, Alice E Algonac 

Smith, Fern Ypsilanti 

Smith, Helen Jane Ypsilanti 

Smith, Lucille M Moshcrville 

Smith, Lyle Ypsilanti 

Smith, Margaret Redford 

Smith, Mildred Saginaw 



STUDENTS 273 



£ ith, Ralph Ypsilanti 

£ ith, Vivian Ypsilanti 

Sj.irey, Claude Jackson 

£bw, Marcia Muskegon 

frenson, Harold E Onekama 

taxiing, Isabelle Sault Ste. Marie 

Paulding, Byron W Rochester 

£ ence, William Ypsilanti 

fencer, Leo J Rushton 

ftittler, Bertha Detroit 

firing, Gladys Mae Ypsilanti 

Quires, Florence East Lansing 

£|ichlewitz, Martha Ypsilanti 

hmbaugh, Louise A Belding 

harns, Ada P Deerfield 

hcker, T'helma Jackson 

here, Dorothy Stuart Ann Arbor 

Belter, Floyd L Bridgman 

Bepanski, Albert, Jr : . Bay City 

fephens, Phyllis Algonac 

Kimm, Belle Brooklyn 

lloddard, Minnetta Fenton 

{joltz, Dorothy Waldron 

owell, Bertha Saranac 

rasen, Hanna Plymouth 

rong, Julian 0. . Azalia 

roud, Edna Akron 

uber, Harry D Clio 

yckle, Maude Imogene Fenton 

indling, Esther V Manistee 

mdling, Goldie Manistee 

itherland, Wallace Kenneth Port Clinton, O. 

dnam, Frances Elkton 

iber, Carmen I Ypsilanti 

imblyn, Mary Filion 

mton, Alice . Detroit 

lylor, Audrey Sault Ste. Marie 

aylor, Feme Pickf ord 

aylor, Guinevere Guelph, Ontario 

35 



274 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Taylor, Margaret B Plymouth 

Teachout, Doris L Brooklyn 

Thomas, Eleanor Williamston 

Thomas, Madeline Monica Algonac 

Thompson, Robert Dansville 

Thorne, Miriam Alpena 

Todd, Stuart Milan 

Tompkins, Theron A Ann Arbor 

Toohey, May Marcela Gagetown 

Torrant, Lyle A Parma 

Travis, Mrs. Ethel H Arcadia 

Trescott, Florence M Harbor Beach 

Trodahl, Ula. Daggett 

Truesdell, Josephine E Wayne 

Tubbs, Kathryn Helen Lansing 

Tu ttle, Vera Jerome 

Uphouse, Esther Monroe 

Van Aken, Elsie A Hillsdale 

Van Buren, Eleanor Caro 

Van Camp, Dorothy Marion 

Vanden Bossche, Cecilia Detroit 

Van Every, Helen Redford 

Van Leuven, Katharine Milford 

Van Winkle, Roy Tecumseh 

Van Zant, Florence Muskegon 

Vaughn, Edwin O Reading 

Vedder, Helen Jackson 

Veitel, Katherine Ravenna 

Vickers, Florence L Wayne 

Vis, Jennie Zeeland 

Vogel, Florence E Chelsea 

Vohlers, Mildred Ionia 

Waineo, Alice Amelia Hancock 

Wakefield, Reva M St. John* 

Wallace, Emma L New Philadelphia, 

Walraven, Marguerite > Essexvillc 

Wallrous, Jane Rocna Chelae* 

Ward, Florence Owossc 

Ward, 8. Louise Big Rapid' 



STUDENTS 275 



arner, Ralph Ann Arbor 

atkins, Martha M Union City 

atkins, Mary E Union City 

atling, N. Ray Ypsilanti 

ebb, Etta North Adams 

! r ebster, Vivian May Kalamazoo 

j'eippert, Lorita Lyons 

: r elch, Catharine New Philadelphia, O. 

! r ells, Alfreda Belding 

fells, Madelin Letitia Flint 

r endland, Frances Flint 

r estbrook, Emily M Pontiac 

r eston, Virginia Allen 

Beaton, Vera I Durand 

bite, Dorothy L Whitehall 

bite, Jean Whitehall 

/ T hitlark, Lucy Bonner Manchester 

7 iard, Morgan F Ypsilanti 

fickham, Frances Saginaw 

Wiggins, Georgia Losantville, Ind. 

Wilcox, Dorothy C . Howell 

files, E. Jane Toledo, O. 

Wilkinson, Marian E Saginaw 

Wilks, Raymond H Yale 

Willemin, Gladys L Portland 

Williams, Feme Tekonsha 

Williams, Lynn Albion 

Williams, Seward Ann Arbor 

Williamson, Fred Ypsilanti 

Willoughby, Robert D Capac 

Wilson, Catharine Ypsilanti 

Wilson, Editha Milan 

Wilson, Kathryn A Belding 

IWilson, Ruby S Prescott 

iWise, Esther F Grand Rapids 

jWisner, Helen B Flushing 

Vithcrspoon, Alan C Belleville 

Wolfinger, Evelyn Litchfield 

Wood, David Henry Romulus 



276 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Wood, Erdeen Sandusky 

Wood, Mabel Marine City 

Wooden, Evelyn Hanovei 

Worden, Hena Marie Hillsdak 

Workman, Mildred Bervilk 

Worley, Wilber Clinton Ann Arbor 

Worner, Fern Grand Rapids 

Worner, Frances Grand Rapids 

Wright, Arthur Carson City 

Wright, Lenore Ypsilant; 

WyckofT, Ruth L Ypsilanti 

Yeakey, J. Clifford Grand Rapids 

Yeatman, Lome E Ann Arboi 

Yeatman, William H Ann Arbor 

Yeckley, John M Ypsilant 

Yost, Donald L Belleville 

Young, Agnes Chelsea 

Young, Erma O Sault Ste. Mark 

Youngs, Winifred H Fowlervilk 

Yurchak, Veronica Detroii 

Zapf, Frieda Monroe 

Zehner, Bernice St. Josept 



SECOND YEAR 

Abbaduska, Florence Waldroi 

Ackerman, Helen Flin 

Adams, Dorothy Muskegoi 

Adams, Florence Morric* 

Adams, Gretta Mae Carson Cit] 

Adams, Lorraine B Grand Rapid; 

Alban, Dorothy M BellevilL 

Albertson, Mrs. Aileen ' Oxfon 

Allan, Jean A Holh 

Allen, Leila Corunn; 

Amos, Isabel H Bad Axi 

Amos, Mildred Bad Axi 

Andrews, June Mancelom 



STUDENTS 277 



drews, Neva Rochester 

drus, Ellen Utica 

iadrus, Sarah Utica 

jigle, Elgie J Almont 

ilpleby, M. Catherine Saginaw 

jj>plegate, Florence Oak Harbor, O. 

jibaugh, William A ; Highland Park 

Aogast, Mary K Coral 

ijms, Esther E Gaines 

mstrong, Caryl Detroit 

mstrong, Edna Highland 

nold, Helen E Standish 

kins, Ora R Fowlerville 

ickland, Edith Grosse Pointe Farms 

istill, Lydia Ypsilanti 

rers, Bernice Tipton 

ide, Grace Romeo 

iker, Abigail Detroit 

iker, Irene H Clayton 

'ilgooyen, Abbie Mt. Morris 

imber, Ethel M Howell 

mwell, Yolande Ypsilanti 

irnes, Marion T Ypsilanti 

irtels, Gustave Leo Mancelona 

irton, Kathryn Grand Rapids 

ites, Beulah M , New Haven 

mm, Lucile A Wixom 

3al, Verneita Addison 

sck, Herman Sebewaing 

?U, Gwyneth St. Ignace 

b11, Ileta Fowlerville 

3llus, Lena Adrian 

3mis, A. Vyrene Temperance 

^nedict, Kathaleen Charlotte 

Bnjamin, Hazel E Fowlerville 

snnett, Bernice Saginaw 

3nnett, Iola M Freesoil 

ennett, Jeanette Adrian 

enson, Helen M St. Ignace 



278 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Blackmer, Edwyna J Mila: i 

Blair, Addie Linde: 

Blair, Gladys E Owoss 

Bloom, Catherine E Maple Cit; 

Bloy, Clarice L Calume 

Boden, Annetta M St. Clai 

Boer, Catherine Grand Rapid 

Bonner, Grace St. Jame 

Borgerson, Ethel Lowe 

Bouldrey, Marion M Concor 

Bovee, Fern Clayto 

Bowen, Claribel Ypsilam 

Bowen, Ruth C Ypsilair 

Braa, Ingaborg M National Mir 

Bradfield, Gladys Evelyn Grand Rapic 

Braidwood, Christine Almor 

Brainerd, Gladys B Coldwato 

Brayton, Mildred Sullivan Clarksvil 

Brewer, Sybil Losantville, In< 

Brewer, Zada Albio 

Brode, Geraldine Bay Cit 

Brokaw, Edna E Rush'c 

Brooker, Rosalind Wyandot 

Brotherton, Ethel Grand Rapi( 

Brower, Velma Sene( 

Brown, Goldie Jenninj 

Brown, Ida C Blanchai 

Brown, Marion L Grand Ledj 

Brown, Ruth Detrc 

Brown, Ruth S Dryd( 

Buckeye, Esther Harriett Detrc 

Bullard, Myra Watervli 

Bullen, Cordelia Mas( ' 

Bunda, Meryl Bervil 

Bunn, Orpha L New Huds< 

Bunnell, Glenn Romul 

Burg, Olga Scottvi. 

Burgman, Glenn Elkt( 

Burrell, Gertrude Irvena Ypsilar 



STUDENTS 279 



B Tell, Paul Ypsilanti 

•t, Dorothy Laingsburg 

ik, Alpha Greenville 

B!>sey, Helen M Bancroft 

ler, George Grand Rapids 

lev, Lorraine I Milan 

Cly, Donna Ypsilanti 

C dwell, Ruth Kalkaska 

Cnpbcll, Agnes Onsted 

Cnpbell, Hazel Owosso 

mon, Grace M Ann Arbor 

Cmcille, Louise M Sault Ste. Marie 

dinal. Genevieve Iron Mountain 

penter, Audrey Ypsilanti 

e, Veva M Millington 

termole, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Cimpney, Orel Alden 

lbb, Helen Howell 

Crk, Catherine Orion 

Crk, Ruth M South Haven 

vette, Gladys Maple City 

Cfe, Joy M Carson City 

Cford, Phyllis Ypsilanti 

)urn, Harriet Alice Ann Arbor 

hran, Medora M Horton 

vin, Gertrude Bay City 

Cmolly, Leota Riga 

C irad, Tessie Vernon 

lverse, Armina , Ypsilanti 

k, Erma F Cheboygan 

k, Irene Ovid 

'ney, Ralph Ypsilanti 

ey, Muriel Grand Rapids 

tello, Helen Lansing 

trell, Margaret Marine City 

ne, Ina E Adrian 

w, Elizabeth Petoskey 

wford, Wanda Sunfield 

ckett, Alma L Blissfield 



280 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



nnon ! 
3troit : 



Cronin, Mary Lei 

Crumley, James J Detroit 

Curtis, Florence Louise Muskegon Heights 

Dauer, Lydia J Blissfield 

Daugherty, Wave N Flint 

Davis, Helen F Ann Arbor 

Davis, Laura Flushing 

Dawdy, Lena H Portland 

Dawson, LaReign Owosso 

Deakin, Perry Detroit 

Decker, P. La Verne Flat Rock 

Dentel, Freeman L Ida 

Dernberger, Beulah E Drydec 

Dick, Mildred Catherine Ann Arboi 

Dickinson, Thelma Kathleen Charlotte 

Dixon, Irving Dentoi 

Dixon, Ruby Salen^ 

Domimick, Mayme Tyr< 

Donaldson, Winifred J Highland Pari 

Dowling, Loretta Owossi 

Downing, Eunice Grand Rapid 

Driggett, George E Charlevoi 

Driver, M. Elizabeth .Gregor 

DufTey, Ruby Sunfiel 

Dunham, Grace A Mt. Fores 

Dunn, Martha Irene Haslet 

Ealy, Eleanor Ypsilan 

Easlick, Hilda B Mila 

Eaton, Lillian Franklin, ( 

Eckenberger, Ella M Dccati 

Egier, Iva R Fi'eesc 

Ei senbeiser, Eleanor Chels< 

Elder, Jane YpsiljD 

Elder, Norinc Mancelor 

Eldred, Esther Ypsilan 

Elfvin, Henry H Ypsilan 

Elliott, Evelyn F Sagina 

Elliott, V. G • II.',, bland Pa 

Emery, Fern Ypsilar 



STUDENTS 281 



i .nag, Harold Ypsilanti 

Wflaon, Elsie A Munising 

akson, Melvin N Whitehall 

SJpan, Edith Royal Oak 

■Qdsen, M. Alice Manistee 

Fvis, Eleanor Millington 

■ps, Eva Helen Lansing 

Ejdby, Allura E Detroit 

xby, Clyde L Britton 

m t, Gladys Manton 

a i, Georgie Battle Creek 

a «y, Bernice . . . Yale 

f a all, Jerome V Detroit 

Feikamp, Hulda M Manchester 

nz, John Flint 

is, Laura E Scottville 

, Olive A Milford 

)r, Helen Greenville 

Fis3r, Irene , Grand Marais 

Mr, Mattie Dryden 

Pis Frances Marjorie Edwardsburg 

Fisk J. Edward Ann Arbor 

[ o , Ptichard Ypsilanti 

Foster, Gertrude Escanaba 

l' oberg, Eva North Bradley 

(Wythe, Helen M .Milan 



Martha Rose Morenci 

William E Coldwater 

cis, Isabelle Ontonagon 

cis, Lenore Ontonagon 

k, Doris : Ann Arbor 

t, Anna M Cadillac 

Fr; jr, Hilma A Detroit 

3r, Mabel M Cadillac 

, Agnes G Bay City 

nan, Edna M Onaway 

ch, Anna L Calumet 

t, Estella Saranac 

r, Clarence R Milan 



282 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Gage, Kathleen Agnes Fy 

Gamble, Athol Maple Rap i 

Garber, Ethel White! | 

Gardner, Margaret N Osc< i 

Garland, Margaret Hxn J 

Gaspardo, Minnie M Calm jb 

Gates, Harriet Bay C % 

Gatz, Amy .... Bridge} t 

Gaul, Margaret E Tawas ( | 

Gauss, Nelson Fred Jack 14 

Gaut, Bernice Vermont 1 6 

Gaut, Lois Vermont e 

Gee, Frances M Ypsil; i 

Geiger, Dorothea Kalama 

Gillmore, Donovan Big Ra; s 

Gitchell, May E Lan g 

Goodrich, Idamae Pon \A 

Goodrich, Thelma Irene Grand Ra'ls 

Goold, Hattie Margaret Ononc a 

Gorham, Donald I Bri ft 

Gorman, Nettie M Sagi w 

Gorsuch, Doris F ' Hu( ji 

Gothiea, Adelaide S Elkhart, M 

Graefe, Hildegarde . Man. 3e 

Graham, Leone Decker k 

Grant, Gordon Allan Kitchener, *jl 

Grant, Mildred .' Carp I jtt 

Green, Florence He fel 

Greer, Frances Char fit 

Griffin, Catherine M Holl 

Griner, Hazel Vermont Ua 

Gritzner, Dorothy MontW 

. Hildred A T'o 

( rrunder, Ruth E Bay iy 

Gunnison, Verna Ovfao 

( iustafson, Jennie E Osp 

Baft, Ekina M Sag|* 

Halladay, Eleanor Huro 9 

I [allenius, Mary Ga;fw 



STUDENTS 283 



jamilton, Ruth M Ludington 

'ammond, Oneita Caro 

anham, Homer Tecumseh 

unsen, Thora E Manistee 

iansor, William Ypsilanti 

!apke, Bernice St. Joseph 

larger, Blanche E Pontiac 

! armon, Gladys L Wixom 

iarr, Rella Evelyn Munith 

iartlep, Alberta H / Saginaw 

ath, Nora Flint 

athaway, Melvin E Ypsilanti 

iyward, Nora Middleville 

eath, Gertrude V Muskegon 

sath, Marjorie L Richmond 

iBath, Ruth Monroe 

!2atley, Esther Detroit 

!9bblewhite, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 

fennink, Catherine Grand Rapids 

fertzberg, Myrtle Ypsilanti 

Witt, Bernice Berrien Center 

leks, Renabel V Richland 

Jggins, Frances S Ypsilanti 

Hderley, Zora Hersey 

'Her, Ola B Almont 

lllmer, Gertrude Plymouth 

illyard, Effie Hillsdale 

Etchingham, Bertha Milan 

idge, Grace E Highland Park 

bdges, Harriet Ithaca 

blbrook, Donald Dryden 

hlmes, Florence M Coldwater 

!)lmquist, Edwjn Jennings 

pltaman, Esther R Detroit 

migh, Mrs. Ada J Pontiac 

juser, Bessie Troy, O. 

>ward, Eva East Jordan 

>we, Madehne Flint 

iltine, Edwin A Ann Arbor 



284 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hurley, Mary C Bay C i 

Hurrell, Delos Owo j 

Hutchinson, Ruth A Waterville, 

Hutton, Catharine Ypsila 

Ingalls, Nellie Charlev 

Isbister, Bessie Port Hui 

Jackson, Carol Deti 

Jackson, Evelyn M Port Hii] 

Jacobs, Violet Y 

Jaffe, Bessie , Boyne F; ■ 

James, Merney C t Calm I 

Jessop, Ellice Williams . 

Jewell, Jessie M Besser 

Johnson, Hattie E Or . 

Jones, Annabella E Lake Lin< 

Jones, Edyth E Bad 1 i 

Jones, Lloyd Ven 1/ 

Jones, Vera Mae Sagir 

Jorginsen, Mae Dearb t 

Kangas, Mayme Calm b 

Kaulitz, Raymond Owe )) 

Keeney, Hazel V Lam 5 

Keillor, Hazel Elki. 

Keith, Nettie S ".Scotto* 

Kelch, Flossie R Ft 

Kellogg, Anna Helen Hopl 8 

Kernen, Arlene Ith a 

Kerr, Katherine I Springfield, I 

Kilburn, Vera I Reac g 

Kinkead, Ethel J Ypsili 

Kirk, Howard D Ma 

Klemmer, Harvey J St. C if 

Knapp, Elizabeth L Hills* e 

Knapp, Natalie ^ e 

Knappertz, Esther Canton*. 

Knight, Lester Laingsl g 

Knight, Rhoda K Trerflf 

l\i-.i. aick, [da II y 

e, Ortall Sagiil 



STUDENTS 285 



ttger, Lucile Wyandotte 

Buz, Frances Menominee 

Ivekard, Jeannette Grand Rapids 

IBatt, Maurine C Mesick 

Ljlwig, Marguerite St. Joseph 

iFountain, Cecilia Monroe 

Liibert, Mabel C Columbiaville 

Ljnbie, Manley Ypsilanti 

Ljnpkin, Paul H Detroit 

Llicaster, Dorothy Parma 

Ljicaster, Pearl Oden 

LJidon, Mildred Fountain 

Lig, Carl F Ann Arbor 



lg, Hattie A Deerfield 

^orte, Alice J Hastings 

son, Florence Manistee 

celle, Loy B Crystal 

L|vson, Pearl Cheboygan 

\\, Louis Ypsilanti 

titer, Meredith Marine City 

Liris, Ilah H Almont 

I'ell, Alma A Big Rapids 

tick, Gladys G North Branch 

L ( ck, Mildred Brown City 

Ldsay, Eva Marie Ypsilanti 

Ldsley, Ruth T Manistique 

erance, Ilah L Williamston 

d, Alberta M Stockbridge 

d, Edna Ypsilanti 

enson, Linnea Ironwood 

Urey, Mable B Saranac 

Liington, Samuel G Yale 

L;'kin S , Duane B Ypsilanti 

Lisenden, Helen M Grand Rapids 

Lach, Harry J Gaylord 

L>n, Ruth Marion Carson City 

IVckan, Burthol C Milan 

Addaugh, Nelle S Boyne City 

frgers, Ruth E Belding 



286 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Mahaffy, Beatrice M i Marletl 

Malenfant, Beatrice Cheboyga 

Malleaux, Marjorie Ann Arb( 

Manchester, Nola Ypsilan ! 

Marsh, Minnie Laingsbui 

Martin, Beulah S Pinckne 

Martin, Lucille Marie Williamsto 

Martin, Oma Lucille Newark, ( 

Martin, Rena Bay Cit 

Matheison, Neil Jeddi 

Mathieson, Herbert Frankfoi 

Matson, Violet M Barag 

Matthews, Mary Hancocl 

Maxwell, Margaret Sault Ste. Mar: 

McCanna, Bertha Ontonago 

McCarbery, Lelah Ridgewa 

McCloskey, Helen Sagina^ 

McClure, Linda Sandusk 

McCool, Marian Traverse Cit 

McCoy, Inis R Aim 

McDaid, Richard F Toronto, On 

Macdonald, Eudora G Sagin^ 

MacDonald, Frances V Deckervilll 

McGee, Jean Pontia 

McGinty, Mary Louise Bay Cit 

McGregor, Margaret Readii 

McKeon, Doris A Grand Rapic 

McKisson, L. Mary Sistersville, W. V< 

MacLarty, Kathryn G Cass Citi 

McLean, Helen Cheboyga 

McNulty, Mary Cleveland, < 

McPherson, Charles Robert Ypsilan) 

MacQueen, Beatrice Wellsville, ( 

Meehan, Margaret Port Huro! 

Meek, Mabel McBai 

Meier, Lorena Wyandot 

Melloche, J Fenry A Wyandoti 

Michelin, Adelaide Marie Cheboyga 1 

Millard, Helen Mary Farmingto 



STUDENTS 287 



ftler, Alton K South Lyon 

I Her, Carl R k Ypsilanti 

ft'ler, Dorothy Romeo 

ftllcr, Florine Dundee 

jller, Mary Helen Ypsilanti 

ftlls, Mary Esther Fremont 

ftjtchell, Myra Detroit 

ftjckler, Nola Archbold, O. 

ftjden, Beulah Pontiae 

ft'ine, Donna Waldron 

ft|llhagen, Mildred -. St. Joseph 

ftj>ody, Abby L Holland 

ft>on, Dora Alice Muskegon 

ft»ore, James W Ypsilanti 

ftore, June Flint 

ftore, Mary Montrose 

ftorman, Miriam E Ypsilanti 

ft ran, Cecilia L Traverse City 

ftirrall, Clarence B Shelby 

ft rton, Alice May Muskegon Heights 

ft sher, Esther Jane Sand Lake 

ft. shier, Margaret Oxford 

ftlsher, Mina Yale 

ftirray, Margaret Coldwater 

ftj-ers, Ford W [ Owosso 

^mpa, Mathilda A Calumet 

Mson, Clara M Grayling 

Nhercott, Gertrude M Charlotte 

£ville, Catherine Woodville 

£ wbecker, Edwina Essexville 

Nvman, Norma St. Johns 

>;hol, Lila Elkton 

Nhols, Nympha D Homer 

Wskless, Bernice L Vassar 

fjsle, Mabel Ann Arbor 

£rton, Margaret Ypsilanti 

£xon, Marjorie Greenville 

Connell, Esther M Montague 

Cver, Clinton W Ypsilanti 



288 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Olson, Anna F Norw; 

Otto, Norma '. Suttons I 

Owen, Edys East Tav 

Palmer, Marie Plymoi 

Palmer, Olive E Blissfi 

Palmiter, Arlia A Mi 

Papke, Edna F Waj 

Pardon, Greta M Ron 

Parker, Florence Blissfi 

Parker, Olga G Chicago, 

Parks, Ruth M Birmingh 

Parm enter, Genevieve Northv 

Patterson, Erma Walker Fl 

Patterson, Mildred A Y 

Paulson, Elna White! 

Pear, Aldean - Saugati 

Pearce, Mildred Pont 

Person, Amy Manis • 

Peters, Ethel C Brook 

Pfannenschmidt, Irene Traverse C 

Pirtle, Eva - Scottvi 

Poast, Mabel Toledo, 

Pond, Elizabeth Owo » 

Porter, Lucia A Wa; 

Potter, Ruth A Port Hu; 

Powers, Ethel Vcrmonvt 

Prey, Nina M Cap 

Pringle, Dora M Sandu," 

Pringle, Edna E Sandu: 

Pruden, Irene M Chark 

Purcell, Ruby Decker? J 

Purcey, Irene From 

Quance, Hazel M St. Ign 

Quigley, Ellen M Sistersville, W. 

Raymond, J. Aleta Charid 

Raymond, Edna ManitouBei 

Reavie, Thelma St. Ign; 

Regal, Florence V Port Clinton, 

Reid, Alice Ypeil 



STUDENTS 289 



lice, Lurline Ypsilanti 

lichards, Ina South Lyon 

lichardson, Olive M Napoleon 

lininger, Gail Edwardsburg 

linn, Eloise St. Clair 

loberts, Lillic E Ithaca 

lobertson, Burtis L Flint 

lobertson, Jean Flint 

lobertson, Marten L Blissfield 

lobinson, Gertrude Highland 

lobinson, Ruth Franklin, O. 

lodal, Christine Frankfort 

logers, Mary E Elba 

lohlf , Madeline Akron 

lohman, Lillie Owosso 

loot, Harriett D Ypsilanti 

loot, E. Lora Manchester 

lose, Ruth M Traverse City 

losenheim, Leona Lima, O. 

loss, Alice Owosso 

fcouget, Frances Blissfield 

lowe, Ethel Harris Bad Axe 

lowley, F. Pearl Laingsburg 

loyal, Ada I Bay City 

tuetz, Emma W Napoleon, O. 

tuffier, Maxine Saginaw 

ackett, Nina Ithaca 

altsgiver, Mildred Grand Rapids 

ampson, Alice Muskegon Heights 

amuelson, Marie East Tawas 

anborn, Fred C Ypsilanti 

angster, M. Avis Decker 

attler, Katherine Charlotte 

avage, Addie Belleville 

avage, Ethel Elkhart, Ind. 

chmid, Dorothea Holland 

chneider, Esther J Washington 

chneider, Lela B Washington 

chrauder, Edmarie E Monroe 

37 



290 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Schuler, Ada C Dundee 

Schultz, Erma Blissfield 

Schulz, Edna M Nashville 

Schumacher, Doris Chelsea 

Schwader, Vada Freeport 

Schweinsberg, Carola M Bay City 

Scott, Frank Romulus 

Scott, Frank F Ypsilanti 

Scott, Joseph Romulus 

Seagert, Hazel G Ann Arbor 

Seeburger, Carolyn Riga 

Seeburger, Katheryn Riga 

Selby, Florence North Star 

Shehan, Dorothy Pinckney 

Sherman, Blanche Evart 

Sherman, Ruth Brewster Cassopolis 

Shoen, Gertrude Stanton 

Shotka, Grace Belleville 

Siglin, Marguerite D East Tawas 

Sikorski, Fillie Rhea Cheboygan 

Simmons, Evelyn Richmond 

Simpson, Alexander Litchfield 

Sipple, Byrnina Grand Rapid 

Sisson, Isabel , . Central Lab 

Skaryi, Bertha Bessemi 

Skeels, Jennie White] 

Slaybaugh, Theo. E Royal Oi 

Slough, Hazel G Cement Cii 

Slyfield, Ella Frankfort 

Smith, Frances Detroit 

Smith, Gladys Ypsilant. 

Sontag, Edna Cheboygar 

Spencer, Hattio A Ishpcminj. 

Spring, Alice Onondagc 

Stage, Gertrude Hillsdale 

Stang, Ella G East Tawas 

Bobbins, Mildred Carson Cit> 

Stevens, Gladys I Osscc 

Stewart, Aurora East Jordai 



STUDENTS 291 



cwart, Marion II Port Huron 

ickley, Harriet L Prescott 

imson, Mildred Davison 

itt ; Elmer R Ypsilanti 

ocum, K. Floyd Hanover 

one, Ethel Lima, O. 

orey, Julia M Evai t 

rahl, Dorothy Fenton 

roin, Alice H Rochester 

uber, Stuart M Clio 

illivan, Irene Ypsilanti 

miner, Margaret Pellston 

nine, Freida B Vermontville 

itfin, Marian Hanover 

rarthout, Gladys Laingsburg 

vitzer, Marguerette Muskegon 

dnam, Florence Elkton 

lylor, Evelyn Leslie 

tylor, Ruth Royal Oak 

ets, Mae v Sandusky 

layer, Edith M Jackson 

lors, Edith Bessemer 

11, Albert W Saugatuck 

mmins, Gertrude Deerfield 

'>mlinson, Geo. E Grand Rapids 

>tten, Flora E Detroit 

r >tzka, Bertha M Muskegon 

r »wnsend, Kitt M Greenville, O. 

r |»wnsend, Ransom S Ypsilanti 

! ask, Margaret Alice Niles 

tollman, Esther Linden 

r .juxton, Flosie Lansing 

Iderhill, Helen S South Lyon 

luderwood, Gladys Britton 

l|>right, Bernice M Potterville 

In Avery, Russell G Holly 

Vderbeck, Maize A Dimondale 

In Horn, Catherine Grand Ledge 

^n Tassell, Amos Laingsburg 



292 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Van Wegen, Nelson L Ypsila 

Vater, Mildred Whiting, L 

Veley, Delia Mae Y P^a 

Vincent, Marion Ypsila 

Volz, Marie D Montr < 

Voorhees, Mrs. Ruby Ann Af J 

Wadsworth, Leora A Olcott, N. 

Waggoner, Mae Pmnel ? 

Waggoner, Martha Bad J * 

Wagner, Norma B Ut , 

Wagoner, Darwin E • ™a? I 

Walker, Howard K Plymou 

Walker, Lester Pe r 

Wallace, Harriet Ellen Bay Cr 

Warner, Josephine Ferguson Y PS^ i 

Washburne, Mabel Grass IJ 

Watkms, Alice Adell M Hillso 

Watkins, Josephine - Grass Le 

Watson, Carrie ^ad e 

Watson, Cleo J "£**1 

Webb, Daniel I ™ ia f 

Webster, Millicent jZ* 

Weinberg, Sylvia ^' l 

Weksler, Bessie • ^ a 

Weksler, Dora jj ,a 

Weksler, Rose \, t 

Welch, Winifred C Be ^ Ji 

Wcng, Myrtle y ap " 

Wescott, Howard. *i an * 

Westbrook, Ruth - m " 

Westoyer, Florence - Ji 

Whalen, Marie _' " ' J 

Wheaton, Carl D l0 Tj 

Wheeler, Nellie M • • • ; "° n 

Whitney, Clarence iWl 

Whitney, Ruth Irene y ^ 

Whittingham, Esther E3 ^A 

Wieland, Gladys ,V •. na 

/« . n lair II u 

Wiese, Albert C 



STUDENTS 393 



se, Florence C. . *. Fair Haven 

■ ox. Mildred F East Lansing 

Wkinson, Lunette Fowlerville 

I liams, Etta D Saginaw 

■liamson, Ethel Marie . . . McBrides 

■more, Gernith S Stockbridge 

■oughby, Wilma M Ithsca 

W;-on, Beatrice Jackson 

Wikler, Elizabeth I Detroit 

Wm, Ethel E Kings Mills 

TViston, Rowland A Saginaw 

verton, Helen Huron, O. 

Iverton, Pearl Huron, O. 

■)d, Elta A * Flint 

)d, Helen C . . . . Ithaca 

^d, E. Pearl Tecumseh 

xls, Stanley H Denton 

Wi)dworth, Elizabeth Grand Rapids 

\V)ldridge, Mary E Belding 

■pen, Lois Gregory 

■per, Bernice Grand Rapids 

En, Tressa Corunna 

light, Keitha D Carson City 

Wjght, Ramona Jonesville 

W ^r-hack, Edna E Dearborn 

Yjes, Gertrude M „ Hopkins 

er, Garnet Avilla, Ind. 

Ykes, Lola B Durand 

t, Jennie Belleville 

ng, Gladys C Dearborn 

Y nglove, Earl H Ida 

Zij ler, Augusta K Saginaw 

: > Alfred Ypsilanti 

Rachel Big Rapids 



Zj 



294 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



THIRD YEAR 

Barton, R. Clark Romulu 

Briggs, Sara Ellen Lakevie\ 

Broecker, Anna W Metamor 

Brooker, Fred S Ypsilant 

Cameron, Maud E Ypsilanl 

Campbell, Lillian Ypsilanl 

Carlson, Oliver Albioj 

Clevenger, Mary Kathryn Nile 

Conat, John M Biain 

Croll, H. Fray Adria 

Curts, Eleanor E Sagina's 

Cutcher, Floyd D Rome 

Darling, Jennie Ypsilanl 

Dean, Mildred R Ypsilanl 

Doty, Blanche DeWit 

Edwards, Helen A Ypsilanl 

Fotheringham, Inez L Bay Cit; 

Frederick, Ellenor Detroi 

Freund, Katherine St. Josep 

Fullerton, Eleanor Ann Arbo 

Greenman, Rhoda M Ypsilanl 

Harris, Howard S Ypsilanl 

Hayes, Florence Ypsilanl 

Hayner, Anna Lou Ypsilant 

Hellenberg, B. M Coldwatc 

Johnson, Effie M Williamston, W. Yc 

Keedle, Gertrude M Ann Arbo 

Knicely, Glen Willi 

Laferfe, Alex J West Ecors 

Landy, Marion K. . . . ; Ann Arbo 

Maher, Katherine Toledo, C 

McCloskey, K. Leora Pinckne; 

Milks, Viola M Norwa; 

Miller, Marian A Paw Pay! 

Murdock, Chaa F Detroi 

Newcomb, Berniece Ypsilanl 



STUDENTS 295 



Jsborn, Harold D Whittaker 

Jsborn, H. Isabel Cassopolis 

'ardee, Edna Spring Arbor 

tichards, Ruby B McGregor 

Ivan, Grace L Portland 

lharpe, Lucille Sault Ste. Marie 

jibley, Bertrand Fay Saginaw 

imith, Floyd L Cedar Springs 

I'tanhope, Mabel Hart 

fatch, Earl C , Omena 

.'hornton, Gladys M Farmington 

Vaggoner, Olive Bad Axe 

VaJker, Venus Wayne 

Varren, Florence A Ovid 

Vigle, Hazel Allchin Webberville 

Vilber, Marjorie Ypsilanti 

Wilkinson, Muriel Saginaw 

Villard, Mrs. May T Ypsilanti 

Williams, Boyd N Ypsilanti 

Viltse, Norris G Tekonsha 

ifoung, Reuben L Milan 



FOURTH YEAR 

3inns, Ray W . . Holloway 

3oughner, Rugh L Sistersville, W. Va. 

]arr, Beatrice Ypsilanti 

2ase, Mary C Ypsilanti 

Castle, Belle Hillsdale 

Uilley, Irma Saranac 

^leveringa, Frederick B Ypsilanti 

Jorrigan, Emmet J . Detroit 

>andall, Jesse W Ypsilanti 

Davison, Alice Brooklyn 

3odge, Agnes E Ringwood, 111. 

jlale, Gerald A Ypsilanti 

lammer, Esther E Reed City 

lenstock, Mrs. Elizabeth Ypsilanti 



296 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hole, James W Ann Arbor 

Humphrey, Archie E Ypsilanti 

Humphrey, Mrs. Archie E Ypsilanti 

Irwin, Manley E Alpena 

Kalder, A. A Ypsilanti 

Lee, Frank H Pontiac 

McClear, E. Roche Whitmore Lake 

McCue, Jean Ellen Goodells 

Osborne, Beatrice H Holland 

Owens, Shirley Leland Ann Arbor 

Penoyar, Nelle Bangor 

Ploeger, Rudolph H Ypsilanti 

Reynolds, John T Berville 

Rynearson, Elton J Ypsilanti 

Sayles, Hazel Laura Grand Rapids 

Shadford, Edwin W. Ann Arbor 

Shawley, George E Ypsilanti 

Spofford, Ellatheda Coldwater 

Sprague, Julia Ypsilanti 

Squire, Elizabeth Sandusky, 0. 

Starr, S. S Ypsilanti 

St. Clair, Gladys Marine City 

Taylor, Edna J Ypsilanti 

Thorn, Isabella Cowles Fennville 

Threadgould, Francis A New Boston 

Van Fleet, Esther Laura Grand Rapids 

Warner, Bertha M Ypsilanti 

Watkins, Flavian; Saginaw 

Webb, Earl C Memphis 

Welden, Louise Hillsdale 

Whiteley, Katherine Klyde Greenville, 0. 

Wilcox, Ora B Lansing 

Wood, Avery C Blanchard 

Wood, Burton I) Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 297 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Begole, Mar jorie Ypsilanti 

Dickerson, Mrs. Hazel Ypsilanti 

Eichhorn, Mabel L Atlantic, Iowa 

Field, Anna W * Ypsilanti 

Foust, Elizabeth G Lansing 

(Goodwin, Mrs. Fredrika Fyfe Ypsilanti 

Hankinson, Nettie D Ypsilanti 

Kenstock, R. A Ypsilanti 

Jefferson, Clara F Ypsilanti 

Klumpp, Helen Saline 

Lintner, Inez L Galien 

McCurdy, Violet Manistee 

McGaw, Mrs. Mary T Ypsilanti 

MacKellar, Lois Ypsilanti 

Quirk, Mrs. D. L Ypsilanti 

jSnauble, Paul L Ypsilanti 

I Wilson, Ella M Ypsilanti 



CONSERVATORY STUDENTS 

Ackerman, Paul, Violin Ypsilanti 

Ackerman, Leila, Piano and Violin Union ville 

Alban, Dorothy, Violin Belleville 

Allen, Charles, Piano Almont 

Allen, Faye, Singing Ypsilanti 

Allerding, Peter, Singing Hastings 

Arms, Aroline, Singing Gaines 

Arms, Esther, Singing Gaines 

Arnet, Doris, Piano Ypsilanti 

Ashby, Lillian, Singing Ypsilanti 

Austill, Lydia, Piano Ypsilanti 

Austin, Janice, Piano Saline 

Austin, Virginia, Public School Music West Branch 

Banta, Ralph, Violin Ypsilanti 

Barnett, Elizabeth, Singing Pontiac 



298 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Barr, Helen, Singing Saline 

Bartlett, Eunice, Piano Memphis 

BeGole, Marjorie, Piano Ypsilanti 

Benford, Robert, Organ and Piano Grand Blanc 

Bennett, Margaret, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bennetts, Florence, Piano Bessemer 

Bennie, Lillian, Singing. . .' Ypsilanti 

Benson, Rowena, Piano and Singing .'■ Munson 

Bird, T. R., Singing Ypsilanti 

Blomgren, Ella, Singing Ypsilanti 

Blum, David, Violin Ypsilanti 

Blum, Solomon, Violin Ypsilanti 

Boomer, Ada, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bossier, Ruth Alwilda, Music and Art Grand Rapids 

Boutell, Evelyn, Singing Ypsilanti 

Bowen, Mrs. Sterling, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bowen, Eleanor, Piano Ypsilanti 

Bradley, Mrs., Piano Ypsilanti 

Brewer, Lylia, Public School Music Pontiac 

Broom, Gwendolyn, Public School Music Mt. Clemens 

Buck, Lucile, Singing Howard City 

Burbank, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Burt, Mrs. Meader, Piano .Ann Arboi 

Cahoon, Emma, Singing Negaunee 

Cameron, Beulah, Music and Art Edon, 0. 

Case, Mary, Piano Ypsilanti 

Cash, Ruby, Piano Ypsilanti 

Cassady, Mrs. R. A., Singing Plymouth 

Carter, Laura, Singing Ypsilanti 

Cayne, Ruth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Challis, John, Piano Ypsilanti 

Chapin, Mrs. Mabel, Organ Ypsilanti 

Chapman, Virginia, Singing Ypsilanti 

( Jhubb, IMan, Singing Ypsilanti 

Clapper, Arbutus, Organ Ypsilanti 

( Jlark, Emily, Piano Belleville 

ClifTc, Joy, Violin Carson City 

( loe, Ethel, Singing Ypsilanti 

Colburn, Harriet, Piano Ypsilanti 



STUDENTS 299 



Coleman, Gertrude, Piano Ypsilanti 

Collins, Harry, Violin Ypsilanti 

iCongdon, Reynolds, Violin Ypsilanti 

iConrad, Tessie, Singing Ypsilanti 

Cook, Helen, Piano Pontiac 

Cosgrove, Mary, Violin Baraga 

Crandall, Marie, Music and Art Linden 

Crippen, George, Violin Ypsilanti 

iCross, Ola, Piano Jackson 

Curtis, Eva, Music and Art Charlotte 

Cutcher, Floyd, Singing Romeo 

;Curtice, Mrs. R. C, Singing Ypsilanti 

iDahlstrom, Etna, Singing Whitehall 

iDavis, Arthur, Piano Ypsilanti 

jDelaforce, Dorothy, Piano Ypsilanti 

jDelaforce, Edna, Singing Ypsilanti 

jDixon, Mrs., Singing Denton 

Eberle, Merney, Singing Ypsilanti 

! Ensign, Lucille, Piano Ypsilanti 

Evans, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

■Evans, Iris, Piano Ypsilanti 

;Everill, Florence, Singing Algonac 

Fenker, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Ferguson, Velma, Music and Art Cass City 

Fidler, Martha, Music and Art Ypsilanti 

Finch, John, Public School Music Saline 

Fisher, Junior, Piano Ypsilanti 

Fletcher, Foster, Singing Ypsilanti 

iFlynn, Helen, Piano Wapakoneta, O. 

Folsom, Elma, Singing . . Seattle, Wash. 

Forche, Leitha, Piano Ypsilanti 

Forester, Mildred, Piano Ypsilanti 

Forst, Sarah, Piano Stroh, Ind. 

Forsythe, Ruth, Music and Art Miian 

Forte, Greta, Singing Ypsilanti 

Foster, Helen, Piano Ypsilanti 

Foster, Marion, Piano Ypsilanti 

Foust, Elizabeth, Singing Lansing 

Fuhrman, Bessie, Singing Decatur 



300 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR ROOK 

Gale, Gerald, Singing YpsiL 

Gardner, Mrs. Elda, Piano Ypsilj 

Gardner, Marion, Public School Music Fowler 

Gates, Alleen, Piano YpsiJ 

Gee, Florence, Violin YpsiL 

Gee, Frances, Piano Ypsilj 

Gee, Genevieve, Piano Ypsilant 

Gill, Kathleen, Organ and Piano Ypsilant 

Gilman, Doris, Music and Art Mila 

Gleason, Ellen, Piano and Violin Capa 

Glover, Mabelle, Singing Fowlervili' 

Glover, Natalie, Singing Ypsilant 

Gorton, Eugene, Singing Ypsilan 

Green, Lena, Singing Walt 

Greene, Neal, Public School Music Brooklyn 

Griffith, Louise, Singing Gerardstown, W. V* 

Gross, Richard, Violin Ann Arbo 

Haft, Edna, Piano Ypsilan 

Hague, Carolyn, Piano Jackso 

Hamernik, Lillian, Violin Ypsilan! 

Hammond, Millicent, Music and Art Hartfoij 

Hanf ord, Pauline, Music and Art Grand Rapic 

Hankard, Jane, Singing Ypsilan! 

Hankinson, Beulah, Piano Ypsilan| 

Hankinson, Janet, Piano Ypsilanj 

Hannan, Mary, Piano Bellevili 

Harnack, Albert, Piano Ypsilan 

Harrington, Dorothy, Singing Panr 

Harris, Bradley, Cornet Bellevil 

Harris, Isabelle, Piano Bellevili 

Harwick, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilan 

Hatch, Eunice, Piano Ypsilan 

Hazel, Catherine, Music and Art Harbor Bea< 

Hertzberg, Freda, Piano Ypsilan! 

Hodges, Harriet, Singing Itha«| 

Bolley, Marguerite, Piano Ypsilan 

Horrigan, Nellie;, Piano Fli| 

Bubbard, Dorothy, Music and Art Conco* 

Hubble, Doris, Piano Ypsilan 



STUDENTS 301 



ubble, Garfield, Violin Ypsilanti 

ubble, Marjorie, Piano Ypsilanti 

uckle, Beatrice, Piano Ypsilanti 

uebner, Mildred, Piano Mt. Clemens 

ughes, Virginia, Violin Ypsilanti 

ullett, Stewart, Trombone Belleviile 

utton, Catharine, Singing Ypsilanti 

'es, Albert, Violin Belleville 

utner, Julia, Singing Manistee 

iqua, Marguerite, Piano Grand Rapids 

rdan, Audrey, Singing Saline 

abat, Mrs. Mary, Singing . .Ypsilanti 

elly, Mary T., Music and Art Dexter 

emp, Dorothy, Music and Art Decatur 

ern, H. A., Violin Ypsilanti 

err, Alice, Violin Ypsilanti 

err, Dorothy, Singing Alden 

err, Mabel, Piano Bad Axe 

iddoo, Harold, Piano Creston, Iowa 

lugh, Rosalind, Singing Ypsilanti 

night, Lester, Piano Laingsburg 

robel, Marion, Piano Ypsilanti 

ramer, Frank, Violin Ypsilanti 

uchenbecker, Alberta, Music and Art Harbor Beach 

urimo, Ina, Piano Mohawk 

ancaster, Minota, Public School Music Clinton 

ansing, Alice, Singing Ypsilanti 

arkin, Dorothea, Piano Detroit 

awrence, Mrs. David, Singing .Ypsilanti 

smmon, Pauline, Singing Ypsilanti 

eppo, Martha, Singing Mansfield, O. 

iwis, Henry, Piano Ypsilanti 

ewis, Irene, Piano Ypsilanti 

:>dewyk, Duka, Public School Music Cadillac 

uscombe, Robert, Public School Music . . . : Ypsilanti 

uscombe, Ruth, Singing Ypsilanti 

lanchester, Thelma, Piano Ypsilanti 

[anion, Imogene, Violin and Piano Alpena 

tartindale, Grace, Public School Music Grand Rapids 



302 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Marvin, Lorraine, Public School Music Jonesvillc 

McClaughry, Isca, Singing Ypsilant] 

McCloskey, Esther, Singing Ypsilanti 

McCool, Marion, Singing Traverse Cit\ 

McCoy, Inis, Singing Ypsilanti 

McElhenie, Leah, Violin Ypsilant. 

McKay, Eleanor, Piano Ypsilant 

McKimmie, Janet, Music and Art South Haver 

McNeil, Laura, Singing Ypsilant 

Meacham, J. Willva, Piano Holl} 

Meredith, Mildred, Music and Art Aller 

Metcalf , Marion, Piano Ypsilant 

Millage, Mrs. George, Singing Ypsilant 

Miller, Bernice, Piano Ypsilant 

Miller, Dorothy, Piano Ypsilant 

Miller, Glenn, Violin Ypsilan 

Miller, Marion, Piano Paw Pa 

Miller, Wendall, Piano Ypsilan 

Minnis, Mary, Piano - Ypsilan 

Moore, Mrs. C. N., Singing Wayn 

Moore, Nina, Piano Ypsilan 

Mosher, Edward, Violin CentreviH« 

Mosher, Esther, Guitar Sand Lak 

Mosher, Mary, Piano Centrevill 

Musch, Clara, Violin Howe 

Mustonen, Aida, Public School Music Hancoc 

Myrmeil, Blanch, Organ Whitehal 

Nelson, Marcelline, Music and Art Allegai 

Niles, Mrs. Ruth, Piano Ypsilant 

Northrup, Violet, Piano Ypsilant 

Och, Hortense, Singing Cheboygai 

Och, Rubye, Music and Art Cheboygai 

Ocker, Margaret, Piano Empir 

( ) , Mara, Leo, Public School Music Lansini 

Osl rander, Neva, Public School Music Yal 

Paine, Esther, Piano Ypsilant 

Parker, Florence, Piano BlissfieL 

Paton, Maurice;, Piano Ypsilant 

Payne, Ruth, Music and Art Battle Creel 






STUDENTS 303 



>eet, Margaret, Singing Ypsilanti 

'enton, Gayla, Music and Art Smyrna 

'erkins, Esther, Singing Ypsilanti 

Person, Helen, Piano Sturgis 

'ittsley, Blanche, Music and Art Port Hope 

'lague, Winona, Piano Belleville 

pollock, Dorothy, Public School Music Cedar Springs 

Sorter, Inez A., Music and Art Bay City 

'owcrs, Mary, Singing Olney, 111. 

pray, Audrey, Piano " Ypsilanti 

pray, Ellen, Violin Ypsilanti 

'ray, Joseph, Violin Ypsilanti 

'utnam, Esther, Music and Art Grand Rapids 

Juirk, Julia, Piano Ypsilanti 

tann, Marion, Public School Music Morrice 

tathbun, Marie, Singing Ypsilanti 

lay, Sybil, Piano Concord 

(eiser, Kate, Public School Music Cadillac 

Puggs, Newell, Piano Wayne 

Robertson, Jean, Piano Flint 

tfobson, Gladys, Public School Music Whitehall 

Rogers, Ethel, Singing Crystal Falls 

^ye, Katherine, Music and Art '. Ludington 

landerson, Harvey, Violin Ypsilanti 

>apnara, Tom, Mandolin Ypsilanti 

lavage, Francis, Piano Belleville 

chafarik, Ella, Piano Ypsilanti 

chaible, T. E., Singing Ypsilanti 

■cheffier, Archie, Piano Ypsilanti 

•chlaroff, Sonia, Violin Ypsilanti 

chmid, Mabel, Singing Petersburg 

I'chultz, Christine, Piano and Organ Ypsilanti 

■chumaker, Rubena, Piano Saline 

I chweinsberg, Carola, Piano Ypsilanti 

cott, Gertrude, Music and Art Harbor Beach 

cott, Helen, Singing Ann Arbor 

covill, Mrs. Winifred, Singing Ypsilanti 

hawley, George, Piano Ypsilanti 

inkule, Joseph, Piano Ypsilanti 



304 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Sinkule, Theresea, Piano Ypsilanti 

Slack, Mrs. Myrtle, Singing Ypsilanti 

Slack, Dorothy, Violin Ypsilanti 

Slawinski, Lucille, Public School Music Detroit 

Smallidge, Olive, Singing Ann Arbor 

Sobolewsky, Velma, Piano Belleville 

Spittler, Bertha, Piano - Detroit 

Spofford, Ellatheda, Singing Ypsilanti 

Stanley, Ruth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Stiles, Nellie, Singing Ypsilanti 

Taylor, Dorothy, Public School Music Clinton 

Taylor, Mary L., Piano Saline 

Taylor, Mildred, Singing Ypsilanti 

Thumm, Lemar, Piano Ypsilanti 

Tiedman, Agnes, Piano Linden 

Topping, Marion, Singing Ypsilanti 

Truesdell, lone, Piano Belleville 

True, Reba, Violin Ypsilanti 

Turney, Mrs. William, Singing Ypsilanti 

Underwood, Thomas, Singing Ypsilanti 

Upright, Bernice, Piano Potterville 

Van Camp, Dorothy, Singing Marion 

Van Ness, Myrtle, Violin Blissfield 

Van Sickle, Mrs. Paul, Piano Ypsilanti 

Vickers, Laura, Piano Ypsilanti 

Vincent, Geraldine, Piano Ypsilanti 

Vis, Jennie, Singing Ypsilanti 

Voorhees, Maxwell, Singing Ypsilanti 

Wadsworth, Leora, Piano Olcott, N. Y, 

Waggoner, Mae, Singing Pinnebog 

Wagoner, Darwin, Singing Wayne 

Wagor, Reva, Piano Hillsdale 

Wallington, Vera, Piano Ypsilant 

Warner, Bertha, Piano Ypsilant 

Warner, Richard, Violin Ypsilant 

Warren, Cora, Singing Ypsilant 

Waters, Stanley, Piano Ypsilant 

Wearne, Elizabeth, Singing Ypsilant 

Webber, ( Jlara, Piano Ypsilant 



STUDENTS 305 



Wcinmann, Evelyn, Public School Music Ypsilanti 

Wells, Elizabeth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Wheeler, Donald, Violin Ypsilanti 

White, Mrs. J. G., Piano Ypsilanti 

Whitney, Mary, Piano Ypsilanti 

Wilcox, Harriet, Public School Music Concord 

Willemin, Gladys, Piano Portland 

Wilson, Pearl, Piano Ypsilanti 

Winters, Leonie, Piano Ypsilanti 

Wood, Erdeen, Singing. Sandusky 

Wood, Nadine, Violin Belleville 

Wright, Gloria, Singing Ypsilanti 

Wright, Keitha, Violin Ypsilanti 

Wyckoff, Ruth, Piano Ypsilanti 

Young, Francis, Piano Ypsilanti 

Youngquist, Martha, Singing Whitehall 

Youngs, Winifred, Violin Fowlerville 

Zeigen, Phyllis, Piano Ypsilanti 

Zink, Alfred, Piano * Ypsilanti 



SUMMER SCHOOL 
1921 

Abbaduska, Verona Waldron 

Abbott, Eva Pontiac 

Abbott, Helen Burdette Coldwater 

Abbott, Marguerite Williamston 

Abbott, Ruth E Hudson 

Ableson, Guy Ypsilanti 

Ackerman, Nora C Swartz Creek 

Ackerson, Margaret Clarksville 

Ackerson, Nellie Manchester 

Adams, Dorothy May Muskegon 

Adams, Effie G Levering 

Adams, Esther Bangor 

Adams, Florence Morrice 

Adams, Marjorie Yale 

39 



306 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Adams, Mary F Britton 

Adams, Mary K Holly 

Adams, Mozelle Norwalk, 0. 

Adcock, Sallie V Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Agnew, Eva Williamston 

Agnew, W. F Williamston 

Aiken, Irene Owosso 

Aikman, Fern M Vanderbilt 

Alger, Edna Clarkston 

Alger, Theonilla Clarkston 

Alkire, Alberta Ypsilanti 

Alleger, Mildred Osseo 

Allen, Bernice Grand Ledge 

Allen, Charles Almont 

Allen, Georgiana Fostoria 

Allen, Leila Corunna 

Allen, Margaret Lyons 

Allerding, Peter Hastings 

Ambrose, Rell A Tekonsha 

Anderson, Edith Onaway 

Anderson, Ethel Port Huron 

Anderson, Florence E Adrian 

Anderson, Grace Highland 

Anderson, I. Millicent Boyne City 

Andrews, Dorothy Jonesville 

Andrews, June Mancelona 

Anger, Laura Melvin 

Anger, Olive , Melvin 

Antcliff, Leila Oak Grove 

Arbaugh, William Highland Park 

Arens, Isabella Fowler 

Argenbright, Gayle Georgetown, Ind. 

Aris, V. Maud Alpena 

Armstrong, Don C Alpena 

Armstrong, Helen Walled Lake 

Armstrong, R. J Belding 

Arnold, Emilie P West Toledo, 0. 

Arnold, Lily Clinton 

Arnold, Nell M Weston, W. Va. 



STUDENTS 307 



Aschbeck, Wauneta Hudson 

Ashton, Lyla Mancelona 

Ashfal, Helen C Grass Lake 

Ashford, Richard Albion 

Asman, Mabel Lydia Bay City 

Asplund, Inez M Iron River 

Atkin, Kathleen Toledo, O. 

Atkins, May Weston, W. Va. 

Auger, Ruth Onaway 

Austill, Lydia Ypsilanti 

Austin, Uvah E Seneca 

Avery, Myrle Hudson 

Axford, Jessie Sikes Pontiac 

Ayers, Ethel Menominee 

Bachelor, Lottie Albion 

Bachmeier, Augusta Warren 

Bacon, Ruth St. Louis 

Bade, Grace Romeo 

Badour, Louise ' Au Gres 

Bailey, Alice Brooklyn 

Bailey, Cora C Pontiac 

Baird, Grace E Ann Arbor 

Baker, Lulu Tawas City 

Baker, Margaret Alabaster 

Baker, Mary Ypsilanti 

Baker, Mrs. Ruth McCloskey Ann Arbor 

Balden, Gertrude Capac 

Balgooyen, Abbie Milan 

Bamber, Ethel M Howell 

Bammel, Emma Marine City 

Banks, Amy C Elba 

Banwell, Mrs. Yolande Ypsilanti 

Barber, Mae Williamston 

Barber, Margaret, C Buckley 

Barbour, C. Traynor Lime Island 

Bardwell, Helene G Cass City 

Barker, Emma C Stockbridge 

Barnard, Myrtle Mancelona 

Barnes, Helen Horton 



308 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Barnes, Marion T Ypsilanti 

Barnes, Wondah Horton 

Barnett, Elizabeth H Pontiac 

Barrett, H. M Ann Arbor 

Bartlett, Rita E Saginaw 

Batcheler, Sarah J Howell 

Bates, Edith M Mancelona 

Bates, Guy Detroit 

Batson, Nora Jackson 

Baxter, Mary Twining 

Bazaan, Esther Holland 

Beal, Oscar R Ypsilanti 

Beal, Verneita Detroit 

Beale, Alma Adealia Onondaga 

Bearinger, M. Edna Saginaw 

Beatty, Marguerite Algonac 

Beatty, Thelma Holly 

Beberstein, Lucille A Flint 

Beck, Helen Mae Grand Ledge 

Beck, Herman Sebewaing 

Becker, Grace S Marine City 

Beckwith, Inez Flint 

Bedell, Doris Bellaire 

Beem, Charity M Pataskala, 0. 

Beeman, Enrique Marine City 

Beeman, Mrs. Juva E Marine City 

Bell, Bertha A Grand Ledge 

Bell, Emma E Reading 

Benjamin, May L Saginaw 

Bennett, Berneice Sault Ste. Marie 

Bennett, Bernice Saginaw 

Bennett, Dolly Holly 

Benson, Rozella R Saginaw 

Bentley, Maxine Lum 

Bergin, Helen Howell 

Berry, Josephine Oscoda 

Berry, Myrtle Marie Grand Rapids 

Berryman, Jennie M Fenton 

Bertke, Anna E Manchester 



STUDENTS 309 



Best, Martha Imlay City 

Betherly, NaVoma Fowlerville 

Bidwell, Esther Wixom 

Bigelow, Mrs. Caroline Fern Cass City 

Bigelow, Elynore F Cass City 

Bigelow, Laura M Cass City 

Bigham, Gertrude Frederic 

Bilby, Don Onsted 

Binder, Avis J Ann Arbor 

Bingel, Floyd J Wayne 

Bingham, Ella Alpena 

Binns, Ray W Holloway 

! Binns, Ruth Buchanan 

Bird, Nancie Wayne 

Bishop, Matilda Foley Luzerne 

Bissell, Marguerite . . . Hanover 

Bittrich, Elsa Lake Linden 

j Black, Mrs. Etta Port Huron 

I Black, Margaret Lake Placid, N. Y. 

! Blackney, Forest G Port Huron 

| Blackwell, Letitia Bad Axe 

Blair, Addie Linden 

Blair, Charles H Jackson 

Blair, Mrs. Charles H Jackson 

Blakeley, Marion Mancelona 

Blank, Clara Hemlock 

Blasky, John Metz 

Bleckner, Lillian Toledo, O. 

Bliton, Esther Ann Arbor 

Bloy, Clarice L Calumet 

Blue, Leland A Flat Rock 

Bock, Pauline Owosso 

Bolgos, Alma Ann Arbor 

Bolt, Kathryn Grand Haven 

Bolter, Mrs. Minnie Lansing 

Bolton, Mattie Laingsburg 

Bond, Geneva G Memphis 

Bond, Ruth M Saline 

Bonewitz, Marian North Manchester, Ind. 



310 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Bonner, Grace St. James 

Boomer, Hazel East Tawas 

Booroer, Lucille Ypsilanti 

Bordine, Caroline M Monroe 

Bordine, Kenneth Monroe 

Bos, Martin D Spring Lake 

Botsf ord, Mae Howell 

Bouldin, Ann W Saginaw 

Bouldrey, Rollo D Concord 

Bowen, Jennie Howard City 

Bower, Edna I Perry 

Bowles, Lena Bancroft 

Bowles, Norman J Millington 

Bowne, Jay Curtis Dexter 

Boyd, Leah M Britton 

Boyd, Zelma A Flint 

Boynton, Lucia Ann Arbor 

Brackenbury, Eva Cass City 

Bradbury, Helen L Dexter 

Bradford, Carrie L Pontiac 

Bradley, Hazel D. . . Madrid, Iowa 

Bradley, Mary Port Huron 

Bradley, Olive Port Huron 

Bradley, Rubye Ypsilanti 

Bradshaw, Gwendolyn : Saginaw 

Brandell, Edward Detroit 

Brandell, Lillian Detroit 

Brandes, Margaret Flat Rock 

Braun, Adrian A • Detroit 

Bray, Glenn Laingsburg 

Bray ton, Mildred Sullivan Clarksville 

Bremer, E. H Colon 

Breu, Pauline Grand Haven 

Brewer, Jessie Mary Pontiac 

Brewer, Zada Florence Albion 

Bricker, Weltha Alvordton, 0, 

Bridger, Edith E Perry 

Bridger, Emily Perry 

Brightbill, Irene L Monroe 



STUDENTS 311 



Bringloe, Marguerite E Ypsilanti 

Bristol, Josephine Almont 

Brock, Grace H Whitehall 

Brogan, Emma Cincinnati, O. 

Brokaw, Edna E Rushton 

Brown, Ada Marlette 

Brown, Flossie Traverse City 

Brown, Hugh E Oak Grove 

Brown, Irene Tyre 

Brown, E. Lucile Pontiac 

Brown, Mabel Tawas City 

Brown, Ruth S Dryden 

Buck, Clara Fowlerville 

Buckelew, Lena Brighton 

Buckindail, Florence Sarnia, Ont. 

Budd, Myrtle Florence Ypsilanti 

Buffmyer, Mary Milford 

Bunn, Orpha L New Hudson 

Bunton, Helen M Ypsilanti 

3urch, Florence Dexter 

3urdette, Virginia Hanover 

|3urdick, Helen C Ann Arbor 

3urdine, Lillie Paducah, Ky . 

3urg, Olga C Scottville 

3urgess, Jennie H Brown City 

3urgess, Millie Almont 

Surgess, Olive Columbiaville 

3urgmann, Glenn Elkton 

toke, Alice M Pontiac 

Surkland, Thyra Cheboygan 

lurnes, Agnes R Niles 

5 urns, Hazel A Hillsdale 

J urns, Romalda Marine City 

tarrell, Paul Ypsilanti 

»urrows, Mina M Holly 

iutler, Doris A , Millbrook 

•utler, Helen D Port Huron 

•utt, Martha Elizabeth Eckford 

►uxton, Florence Fenton 



312 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Byrnes, Vida Marlctte 

Byron, Ruth Saginaw 

Cahoon, Mrs. Emma R Negaunee 

Cairns, Gladys Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Caldwell, Alice V Kalkaska 

Caldwell, Jennie E Bryan, 0. 

Caldwell, Ruth Kalkaska 

Calhoun, Herbert J Grand Ledge 

Cameron, Mrs. Eva 1 Norway 

Cameron, Kathleen Avoca 

Campbell, Blanche Harbor Beach 

Campbell, Catharine Belleville 

Campbell, Lillian Ypsilanti 

Campbell, Maxine E Cass City 

Campeau, Alma R Bay City 

Capper, Esther E Hudson 

Carlson, Gertrude May ville 

Carlson, Martha St. Louis 

Carmody, Catherine Fenton 

Carmody, Helen Fenton 

Carpenter, Audrey Ypsilanti 

Carpenter, Bessie Pontiac 

Carpenter, Joseph Kalamazoo 

Carpenter, Margaret Pittsford 

Carpenter, Ralph R Pontiac 

Carr, Beatrice Ypsilanti 

Carr, Beulah Bad Axe 

Carr, Mrs. Edith I Ypsilanti 

Carson, Mrs. Ida Bay City 

( la rt wright, Walter J Bancroft 

Case, Mabel D Blissfieid 

( Jase, Veva MillingtoD 

( Jash, May Manchesti 

Casler, Gertrude Ypsilanti 

Cassidy, Clara E Ortonvil 

Cathcart, Margarel Scott Flint 

Cattell, Everett I) Hudson 

( Javin, Margarel Ypsilanti 

Chadwick, Joyce C Saginaw 



STUDENTS 313 



pmberlain, Edna Brighton 

pmberlin, Ethel M Calumet 

■timbers, Garnet Ruth Alveda, O. 

landler, Donald Holloway 

landler, Virginia H Michigan City, Ind. 

Jpperon, Mary E Oscoda 

■pin, Mrs. Lillian Bear Lake 

■toman, Virginia Vandalia 

lase, Ethel Dunbar Bear Lake 

lat field, Irma Birmingham 

leeney, Ruth M Chesaning 

lenvinsky, Kathryn B Vanderbilt 

hilds, Iva Milford 

hilds, John Robert Vermontville 

hape, Lorene Kinde 

hristenson, Robert S Weston 

hristman, F. Louise Toledo, O. 

hristopher, Louise K Fruitport 

hryst, Janet F Van Wert, O. 

hurchill, Alberta Port Huron 

hurchill, Frank .*! Imlay City 

hurchill, Vena L Brown City 

illey, Irma Saranac 

lara, Cora Gagetown 

lark, Alice Highland 

lark, Belle C Port Huron 

lark, Dorothy E Rockford 

lark, Edith M Brown City 

lark, Elizabeth Grand Ledge 

lark, Lula G Warren, O. 

lark, Mrs. Mabel T Lakeview 

lark, Maradia Whitehall 

lark, Retha Elsie 

lark, Ruby Durand 

lark, Zelpha Mikado 

larke, Irene Brighton 

larke, Marion Eaton Rapids 

layton, Dorothea Brighton 

lemons, Lyie C Otisville 



314 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAE BOOK 

Clendenan, Arleigh North Branch 

Cleveringa, Frederick B Ypsilanti 

Clickner, lone Allen 

Cliffe, Joy M Carson City 

Clifford, Rosalie O Ypsilanti 

Clinton, Anna L Ann Arbor 

Clock, Eva M Allegan 

Clough, Evelyn Ypsilanti 

Clough, Helen L Bancroft 

Coates, Mary H Flint 

Coburn, Grace James Memphis 

Cochrane, Mrs. Edith Jackson 

Cochran, Medora M Horton 

Coe, Catherine Owosso 

Cole, Alice Fowlerville 

Cole, Bessie I Flint 

Cole, Edna B Deckerville 

Cole, Gladys L -. Chesaning 

Cole, Jessie F Ann Arbor 

Coleman, Elizabeth Mae Flint 

Collier, Helen Ann Arbor 

Collins, Blanche Flint. . 

Collins, Hazel C Columbus, 0. 

Collins, Marion P Eaton Rapids 

Colvin, Chrystal Genevieve East Lansing 

Colvin, Gertrude Bay City 

Comfort, Elizabeth R Tecumseh 

Cone, Lucile Pontiac 

Conklin, Hilda L Chesaning 

Conklin, Julia M Manchester 

Conley, Julia Rochester 

Conley, Margaret J Ann Arbor 

Conlin, Lucile E Tipton 

Connors, Ann Lapeer 

Conrad, Teasie Vernon 

Converse! Mrs. Lucia Drake Union City 

Cook, Mrs. Emma A Ann Arbor 

Cook, Helen M Pontiac 

( loon, Irene Jonesville 



STUDENTS 315 



Cooper, Alta . Britton 

Cooper, Edith Hancock 

Cooper, Elva Britton 

Cooper, Grace P , Ida 

Cooper, Nelma E \ Hancock 

Corcoran, Edna Carleton 

Corrigan, Emmet Detroit 

Corrin, Winifred Flint 

Cotton, Mabel J Armada 

Coulson, Mary E Prescott 

Co veil, Georgianna Dundee 

Cowan, Eliza Moore North Street 

Cox, Josephine Concord 

Cox, Ruth Petersburg 

Coyle, Mary A. R Whitmore Lake 

Crabtree, Beatrice Buchtel, O. 

Craft, Mrs. Adelaide B Grass Lake 

Craig, Mary Millersburg 

Crampton, J. E Ypsilanti 

Crampton, Katherine M Ypsilanti 

Crandall, Jesse W Ypsilanti 

Crane, Hazel Ovid 

Crane, Irene Portland 

Cranston, Carlotta Williamston 

Crawford, Beatrice Elberta 

Crawford, Helen. . . . , Brooklyn 

Crawford, Hester Milford 

Crawford, Isabelle Mt. Clemens 

Crawford, Mrs. J. E Cass City 

Crawford, Marion A Port Huron 

Crawford, Ruth Romeo 

Crawford, Wanda Sunfield 

Creitz, Royal J Charlotte 

Crisp, Mrs. George Williamsburg 

Crisp, Josephine Williamsburg 

Cronin, Mary Lennon 

Crosby, Mary A Vassar 

Crosser, Helen Brazil, Ind. 

Crosser, Mabel Brazil, Ind. 



316 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Grossman, Bruno Detroit 

Cruger, Dorothy Jackson 

Crumley, James J Detroit 

Currey, Blanche Bay City 

Currie, Gladys ? Prescott 

Curry, Bessie Britton 

Curtis, Eva M Flint 

Curtis, Howard E Hale 

Curtis, Lera B Edmore 

Cutcher, Floyd D Romeo 

Cutler, Alice L Grass Lake 

Cutler, Vernice Marlette 

Daeubler, Hulda C Monroe 

Dager, Ruth Canton, 0. 

Dahlstrom, Edna M Whitehall 

Dahn, Olive Imlay City 

Dale, Myrtle Lapeer 

Dalton, Mary E Yankton, S. D. 

Daniels, Irma Little Rock, Ark. 

Daniels, Leta L Sand Creek 

Dann, B. D Owosso 

Darby, Isabel Flushing 

Darling, Jennie Ypsilanti 

Daugherty, Nina M St. Charles 

Davidson, Edna DeckerviJle 

Davidson, Ralph Harbor Beach 

Davis, Elizabeth Ann Arbor 

Davis, Florence Muskegon 

Davis, Florria Ypsilanti 

Davis, E. Irene Ypsilanti 

Davis, Martin Daleville, Ind. 

Davis, Ninetta M Ypsilanti 

Davison, Alice M Brooklyn 

I >awes, Evelyn Osooda 

I )ay, Delia J Hemlock 

Day, Lee Ypsilanti 

Dean, Elsie Howell 

Dean, Mildred Rusha Ypsilanti 

Dear, Mrs, [va I Birmingham 



STUDENTS 317 



Dcaring, Aba LaRue Parma 

Deasy, Selinda Opie Royal Oak 

DeCamp, Merrill Leslie 

Decker, Sudie Bond Carleton 

Defendorf , Thelma Fowlerville 

DeGraw, Bernice E Port Huron 

DeLand, Floyd E Adrian 

DcLand, Mrs. Harriet W Saginaw 

Delaney, Esther Linden 

Delaney, Fern Davison 

DeLine, Berniece Edna Addison 

Demaree, Mrs. Alma B Adrian 

Demarest, Anna DeTour 

Dennis, Emma Sandusky 

Dennis, Venola Ann Arbor 

Densmore, Rhoda A Oscoda 

Densmore, Velma R Ionia 

DePew, Leone Ypsilanti 

Depew, Myrtle Caro 

Deplaunty, Jennie Kawkawlin 

Derbyshire, Anna H Flint 

Derbyshire, Marietta Manton 

Dernberger, Harriet Leonard 

Derrer, E. Maude Mancelona 

Deters, Caroline K Ann Arbor 

Debroy, Irene Manistique 

Dewey, Lillian M Bellaire 

Dibble, Lillian G Ridgeway 

Dick, Martha Vassar 

Dicken, Carrie L Ann Arbor 

Dickinson, Agnes Benton Harbor 

Dickinson, Thelma K Charlotte 

Dickson, Mamie A St. Louis, Mo. 

Diehl, Bessie " Johnstown, O. 

Diehl, Katharine Ann Arbor 

Diehl, Louise Marshall 

Dillon, Ellen M Addison 

Dixon, Esther Orwell, O. 

Dixon, Jessie Brooklyn 



318 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Dixon, Walter E Denton 

Doctor, Dora Charlevoix 

Dodds, Flora North Branch 

Dodge, Lula T Almont 

Dolbee, Ruth Mason 

Dommer, Esther Bad Axe 

Donahoo, Elizabeth Owosso 

Donigan, Mildred > . . . Owosso 

Donner, Gladys Lapeer 

Doolittle, Lugarda J Mansfield, 0. 

Doolittle, Margaret . Pioneer, 0. 

Doolittle, Ruby Mansfield, 0. 

Dorr, Eva F Grass Lake 

Dotson, Georgia F Highland Park 

Dowling, Ruth Akron 

Downey, Flora Weston, W. Va. 

Downey, Ida Weston, W. Va. 

Downing, Lillian Holly 

Doyle, Alice C Grand Rapids 

Drake, Ruth Ypsilanti 

Dreibelbis, Leslie R Orangeville, 111. 

Drouyor, Dorothy Brooklyn 

DuCheny, Helen M Rapid City 

Duke, Mrs. J. P Port Arthur, Tex. 

Duke, Thelma G Port Arthur, Tex. 

Duncan, Mildred . . . , Rush ton 

Duncanson, Jessie Ann Arbor 

Dunham, Grace A Mt. Forest 

Dunlap, Inez Petersburg 

Dunlap, May Decker 

Dunn, Mary Port Huron 

Dunning, Lawrence Howell 

Dunsmore, Douglas N Rochester 

Durf ee, Margaret Joyce * Ann Arbor 

Durgan, Gertrude Columbiavilie 

Durgan, Lillian B Columbiavilie 

Dutchcr, Velda Lansing 

Dutnell, Ethel M West Dover, 0. 

Dutton, Marguerite Birmingham 



STUDENTS 319 



button, Myrtle Orion 

)uVall, H. Blair McBain 

)wyer, Florence C Hudson 

)yball, Helen E Flint 

)yer, John Gregory 

Earl, A. Flossa Ypsilanti 

East, Sophia Ann Arbor 

Easterly, Isabelle T Bay City 

Eastman, Hazel Petoskey 

Ebeling, Bernice • Romeo 

Ebeling, Mildred Romeo 

Eckenberger, Mrs. Ella M Decatur 

Eddy, Beatrix Alpena 

Eddie, Fannie Ann Arbor 

Edgerton, Ila M Allenton 

Edington, Ida Morrice 

jEdmunds, Catherine Youngstown, O. 

Edwards, Emily S South Rockwood 

jEggert, Mrs. Laura - Saginaw 

Egget, Clara C Ypsilanti 

Ehnis, Esther S Monroe 

Eichbauer, Clara Monroe 

Eilers, Marguerite A Montague 

Eilola, Anna Hancock 

Eisenman, Warren T Samaria 

Elder, Elma A Petersburg 

Elder, Katherine Ravenswood, W. Va. 

Elliott, Berneice Flint 

Elliott, Evelyn F Saginaw 

Elliott, Ferris G Highland Park 

Elliott, John H Ypsilanti 

Ellison, Agnes Alpena 

Ellsworth, Bert B Richmond 

Ellsworth, Lelah Stockbridge 

Ellsworth, W. A Wayne 

Ellsworth, Mrs. Wella Wayne 

Elvey, Doris L Carsonville 

Elwood, M. Alice Flint 

England, Lillis Hillman 



320 STUDENTS 



Engler, Helen M Grand Ledg j 

Ennes, Olive Towe 

Erskine, Elizabeth Hudso i 

Ervin, Mrs. C. P Ypsilam 

Erwin, Minnie A Saginaw 

Estabrook, Eudora Porter Grand Rapid J 

Etter, Irene M Covington, C 1 

Evans, Elizabeth Youngstown, C i 

Evans, Gertrude Richmon i 

Evans, Gladys A Port Huro 

Evans, Mildred Eaton Rapio 

Evans, Velma M Morem 

Everett, Gertrude South Lyo 

Everhart, Lelah R Flir 

Everill, Florence G : . . Algona 

Everill, Winifred Algon 

Ewell, Eloise Ypsilan 

Eyster, Florence R Cincinnati, 

Fair, Lois Corunn 

Faler, Chauncey D Hudso 

Falkofski, Emma Marie Wayr 

Fallowell, Mary Jeroir 

Farr, Jean G Fli 

Farrish, Ethel Ypsilan 

Fast, Mrs. Chas Montgomer 

Fast, Theressa K, Montgomer 

Fee, Lena M Sagina 

Feldkamp, Hulda M Manchestc 

Fell, Mae Bellevil 

Fellabaum, Ruth L Hudsc 

Ferguson, Gertrude Sagina 

Fern, Gertrude Lake Cit 

Fel zer, Margaret A R^ 

Fewlass, Marion Howard Ci! 

Finster, Nan Edith Port Hurc 

Fish, Eleanor Lee Algom 

Fish, Reva Moren 

Fisher, Aha L Plymoul 

Fisher, Grace B Lesl 



STUDENTS 321 



sher, Lena Dryden 

sher, Mattie Dryden 

agg, Theresa M East Jordan 

eming, Agnes Munith 

eming, Kathryn Isabelle . Vernon 

eming, Mildred Cass City 

ood, Lillian Saginaw 

ynn, Pauline E Flushing 

>bair, Mabel A Ludington 

igarty, Alice June Columbus 

>garty, Mary Columbus 

>hey, Mary T Ann Arbor 

>ley, Elizabeth Fenton 

)ley, Gertrude Luzerne 

>ote, F. Estelle Bay City 

)ote, Ethelyn, M Albion 

)rd, Ida L , Ypsilanti 

)rsberg, Eva C North Bradley 

xrst, Sarah Stroh, Ind. 

)rsyth, Kenneth E. Blissfield 

)rt, Anna M Centreville 

)ster, Doris E Grass Lake 

)wler, Glenn O Eaton Rapids 

)\vler, Lucile E Holloway 

)\vles, Florence Bay City 

Harold Lansing 

)x, Rachel B Fowler 

)x, Zelma E Charlotte 

)y, William E Coldwater 

amke, Margaret Munger 

'ank, Bruce K Rochester 

anck, Mrs. Estella Fhnt 

anz, Pearle M Custer 

rary, Minnie R Lapeer 

'edenburg, Mae Pompeii 

rederickson, Esther Gaylord 

reeman, Gladys Plymouth 

rendt, Anna Mt. Clemens 

riedly, Arloa M W. Toledo, O 

41 



322 NOBMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Friend, Essie Bellair 

Frinkle, Herman C Stockbridg 

Fritz, Dora N Cass Cit; 

Froelich, Clara E Fresno, C 

Frost, Estella Sarana 

Frost, Lyndle Vassa 

Fryman, Grace Addisoi 

Fuhrman, Bessie Decatu 

Fuller, Clarence R Mila 

Fuller, Harlan Hudsoi 

Fullmer, Gladys R Snovc 

Fuoco, Theresa Pontia 

Gainsford, Lucille Findlay, C 

Gage, Kathleen Flin 

Galbraith, Nellie V Royal Oa 

Gale, Lula Parkersburg, W. Yi 

Galleher, Kate Pulaski, Art 

Ganssley, Myrtle Lenno 

Garber, Coila M Strasburg, C 

Gardner, Aaron K Croswe 

Gardner, Elda K Lansin 

Gardner, Margaret N Oscod 

Gates, Mary Lapee 

Gearhart, Blanche I Howe 

Gearhart, Myrtle Belle Howe 

Geer, F. Helen Ypsilant 

Geisenhaver, Myrtle Dimondal 

George, Blanche Rochestc 

Gibbons, Elizabeth « Alpen 

Gibney, Agnes Gregor 

Giddings, Arthur E Jerom 

Giffels, Clara Laingsbur 

Giffels, Irma Laingsbur 

Gilbert, Lucille E Perr; 

Gilbert, Mrs. Lydia M Strathmoo 

Gilbert, Marian J Molin 

Gilday, Alice Eri 

Gillet, Mary E Toledo, ( 

Gillet t. Ross Cement Cit, 



STUDENTS 323 



(llooly, Nora Weston, W. Va. 

(Iman, Vivian Germfask 

{master, Ruth Bay City 

Ifcner, Kathryn Stockbridge 

( tchcll, Lura Pearl Laingsburg 

eason, Mrs. Grace L Old Mission 

eason, Mary E ; Lennon 

eason, Scott Belleville 

eason, Vera A Ypsilanti 

ore, Cecil Mbrenci 

over, Paul O Ypsilanti 

)ble, Ola Milan 

)dfrey, Edith Parma 

)dwin, Edith Gertrude Grand Rapids 

x>dall, Frances A Cass City 

Dodge, Bessie Elba 

3odhue, Florence Lansing 

3odrich, Idamae Pontiac 

x)dson, Isabel Pontiac 

Drdenier, Edna E Dexter 

)rdon, Esther N. K'ingsville, O. 

)rdon, Ethel B Owosso 

orham, Norma , . . . Britton 

'.ottschalk, Erwin H Capac 

racen, Maude I Salem 

raham, Ruth Baraga 

ranger, Joseph Concord 

rant, Bella Mikado 

rant, John F Detroit 

rant, Mabel Oscoda 

raubner, Carrie Mayville 

-ray, Elizabeth Croswell 

ray, Marian West Branch 

ray, Marion Jackson 

reen, Marjorie Brown City 

reene, Hazel Goodells 

reene, Margaret H Birmingham 

reenlees, "Ethel Cheboygan 

reenman, Mrs. Rhoda M Ypsilanti 



321 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Greenwood, Grace Oxford, Ind 

Gregg, Bess Genoa, 

Gregg, Howard Standisl 

Gregory, Aline Royal Oal 

Gregory, Arnold C Goodricl 

Greiner, Mary R '. Pinckne^ 

Grice, Alice Cadilla< 

Grice, Nellie Cadilb 

Griffin, Catherine M HoweJ 

Griffin, Ella A Grand Rapid; 

Griffith, Louise Martinsburg, W. Va 

Griggs, Helen Pontia 

Griggs, Ruth Saginav 

Grill, Mildred C Elsi< 

Grimes, Elizabeth Ravenswood, W. Va 

Grimes, Myrlan Dansvill 

Gristock, Monna Owoss< 

Griswold, Florence Manitou Beac 

Gritzner, Dorothy Montagu 

Grophear, Herman H Azali 

Guinan, Catherine Ypsilan 

Guinan, Margaret Cheisc 

Gunderman, Irene Bancro 

Gunville, Rose M Graylin 

Gustafson, Celia Oscod 

Gustafson, Jennie E Oscod 

Gutchess, Vesta Nashvill 

Hacking, Ethel M Richmom 

Hackwell, Mrs. Jean B Munisin 

Haddix, Ethel Leona Grand Ledg 

Hage, Reinier C Id 

Hager, Beulah Sunfiel 

Hagle, Elizabeth Alpen 

Hague, Winafred L Okemo 

Hagni, Zora South Lyo 

Hakes, Pauline Norwalk, C 

Hall, Anna I Melvi 

Hall, Caroline E Pontia 

Hall, Mrs. Grace I , Cadilla 



STUDENTS 325 



ill, Olive B Imlay City 

i!l, Omar T Adrian 

all, Romanzo B Whittemore 

all, Vira Davisburg 

allahan, Mae A Fenwick 

allock, Laura Milan 

iallock, Mary North Branch 

amet, Mary E Bay City 

amilton, Dorothy Howell 

amilton, Marian St. Marys, O. 

ammell, Mary , Howell 

ammer, Esther E Reed City 

ammet, Elizabeth Charleboix 

ammet, Ruth C Charlevoix 

xnimond, Oneita Caro 

ankard, Jane Munith 

xnlon, Catherine Port Hope 

ansen, Gertrude H Manistee 

insen, Lillian , Manistee 

arbin, H. Wilma Port Hope 

arrington, Ethel Owosso 

arris, Georgiana Cadillac 

arris, Howard Ypsilanti 

arris, Leatta Williamston 

arris, Leola Palmyra 

irris, Mae Dexter 

irrison, Eugenia Napoleon, O. 

art, Lucile Montgomery 

art, Ora ; Howell 

artley, M. Loretta Waldron 

artwell, Hazel M Milan 

arvey, Bertha M Fenton 

irvey, George W Fenton 

arvey, Mabel Fenton 

iskins, Helen B Waterville, O. 

asty, Earl Standish 

isty, Julia Standish 

itchadourian, Satenik S Detroit 

athaway, Agnes Anna Ypsilanti 



326 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Hathaway, Althea Byroi 

Hathaway, Melvin Ypsilant 

Hathaway, Sena Tecumsel 

Hatter, Clyde O Azali. 

Hattersley, Margaret Ellen Saginaw 

Haueter, Viola D Strasburg, C 

Haugen, Josephine Frankfor 

Haughton, Margaretta E Washingto 

Hawkins, Grace Plymout 

Hawkins, Hazel Vermontyill 

Hawkins, Martha J Hudso 

Hayes, Arlene Quinc 

Hayner, Anna Lou Ypsilan 

Haynes, Pearl Hillsda! 

Hay ward, Arlene Hillsda 

Heatley, Esther Detro 

Hebblewhite, Elizabeth Ypsilan 

Hebersteit, Hilda M Brightc 

Heckel, Dorothy O Ic 

Hecock, Olive G , Dimonda 

Hedrick, Ethel Ypsilan 

Heggeman, Mary Delphos, ( 

Heimforth, Maude Traverse Cil 

Helmbold, Robert C Ypsilan 

Hendershot, Ha M Mik 

Henderson, Isabel C Cadill; 

Henderson N. Maude Sagina 

Henderson, Mildred Stockbridj 

Henderson, Thelma Bervii 

Hennink, Catherine Grand Rapi 

Henry, Geraldine St 

Henry, Lloyd HiJ 

I fenstock, Mrs. Elizabeth Ypsi 

I Eenzie, ( Jatherine Manchi 

Mcron, Clara Millersbu 

Herrington, Sadie Conco 

Hetley, Mrs. Alice H Traverse 

Hewitt, Bernice Berrien Cent 

Hibbs, Cleon Litchfit 



STUDENTS 327 



icks, Clara B Ypsilanti 

igbcc, Lottie Montgomery 

iggins, Emily M Tecumseh 

jiggins, Frances Ypsilanti 

ills, Theo M Laingsburg 

illiard, Emily S Alpena 

Izinger, Louise Royal Oak 

lines, Faith Auburn, Ind. 

irt, Helen B Ypsilanti 

iscock, Marion Ypsilanti 

oag, Irene L Sparta 

odge, M. Alfreda Webberville 

odge, Grace Eleanor Highland Park 

odges, Genevieve Ithaca 

odgkin, Catherine Owosso 

odskin, Nina M Burlington 

oelzer, Ethel A Clinton 

offman, Irene Munith 

ogan, Margaret Linden 

olden, Signa Regina Elberta 

olland, Edna Linden 

olley, Susie Leighton Farmington 

ollister, Clifford Lennon 

ollister, L. Emma Bay City 

olmes, Florence M Coldwater 

olmquist, Edwin Jennings 

onecker, Jean Henderson 

onigh, Mrs. Ada J Pontiac 

ook, Adeline Owosso 

ooper, Helen M South Lyon 

[ooper, Percy E Vulcan 

i ornby, Grace H Port Huron 

[o-rton, Bertha Montrose 

forton, Iva L , . Parma 

Totaling, Marguerite Chesaning 

[oase, Ethel Harbor Beach 

Touse, Harold Jackson 

foueton, Edith F , Baldwin 

lover, Mrs. J. M : Ypsilanti 



328 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Howland, Meroe Ann Arb 

Howlett, Florence Chels* 

Hoy t, Donna V Gaylo: 

Hoyt, Julia Toledo, < I 

Huddleston, Mrs. Mary Jacks< 

Hudson, Alice E Marlet i 

Hudson, Myrtle Ponti; 

Hudson, Ula M Webbervil 

Huested, Mildred All< 

Huff, Ethel R Fli 

Huff, Garnetta M Essexvil 

Huff, Gerald A Medii 

Hughes, Clifford West( 

Huheey, Kate Covington, K 

Huheey, Lillian A Covington, K 

Hulett, Louise Arma( 

Hull, Eleanor St. Igna 

Hunt, Beatrice Lansii 

Hunt, Gladys Lansii 

Hunt, Mattie Lansii 

Huntley, Marguerite •. Jacksc 

Hurley, Eleanor Toledo, ( 

Hurst, Laura Ypsilan 

Huston, Helen M Lima, ( 

Huston, Maybelle M Pottervil 

Huxtable, Florence Lansii 

Hyde, Bess L Port Hurc 

Ibe, Bertha S Neway^ 

Ingraham, Ada G Holyoke, Mas 

Ingraham, Emma B Holyoke, Mas 

Ingraham, Ida M Holyoke, Mas 

Ingram, Florine T Danville, K; 

Irish, Esther Pontk 

Irwin, Fern E Maso 

Irwin, Manley E Alper 

Iveson, Helen Addiso 

Ivory, Bessie E Goodric 

Jackson, Iva Deerfiel 

Jackson, Ruby M Banero 



STUDENTS 329 



ackson, Stella Caro 

acobs, Clara Toledo, O. 

aitner, Julia Manistee 

ameson, Cora M ., Ypsilanti 

ameson, Mary S Ypsilanti 

ameson, Mildred R Fairgrove 

anney, Bessie B Dundee 

arka, Elizabeth Manistee 

arrad, Gertrude Perry 

edele, Alma Clinton 

enkins, Beatrice Kalkaska 

ennings, Fern Byron 

ens, Lasetta E Elba 

ensen, Audra Millington 

ensen, Golda Boyne City 

errey, Margaret Bay City 

essup, Dorothy H Ypsilanti 

essop, Ellice Williamston 

ohnson, Anna D Cincinnati, O. 

ohnson, Cornelia Ann Arbor 

ohnson, Ella A Manistee 

ohnson, Hattie E Orion 

ohnson, Muriel A Chief 

r ohnson, Myrtle East Tawas 

fohnson, Olga M Metropolitan 

r ohnson, Olive Essexville 

fohnson, Ollie Caledonia 

lohnston, Leah Samaria 

jFohnston, Lois M Peck 

jrohnston, Ruth Harbor Beach 

Tones, Blanche L Croswell 

Tones, Emma H Grand Rapids 

Tones, Joel L. A Newark, O. 

Jones, Josina Harbor Springs 

Jones, Maggie E Danville 

jlones, Vera Mae West Branch 

|Judd, Mrs. Florence Boyne Falls 

lurn, Clara B Imlay City 

Kabat, Mary Richert Bay City 



330 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Kaiser, Clara Rcdridg( 

Kalmbach, Max M Gregbrj 

Kanthak, Marion ■. Harbor Beach 

Kapnick, George Palmyra 

Kearns, Hester Brown Cit} 

Keedle, Gertrude M Ann Arbor 

Keeney, Hazel Lansing 

Keesler, Lela Howel 

Keho, Helen Saginaw 

Keillor, Hazel Elktor 

Keller, Velera Howel 

Kellum, M. Effie Lansing 

Kelly, Nellie M Oxforc 

Kemp, Irlyn Ottawa Lak( 

Kemp, Marion Saginav 

Kempster, Carrie Coldwate: 

Kennedy, Alex St. Clai:. 

Kennedy, Blanche L St. Clai] 

Kennedy, Mae Grand Rapid: 

Kennelly, Helen West Brand 

Kensler, Feme Plymoutl 

Kenyon, Dorothy PortlaiK 

Kenyon, Marion E West Brand 

Kerkhof , Janet Saginav 

Kern, Howard Alfred Ypsilant 

Kernen, Arlene Ithac; 

Kerney, Thomas G YaL 

Kerr, Edna Marguerite Carletoi 

Kerr, Mabel O Bad Ax< 

Kerr, Margaret Birch Rui 

Kerr, Martha V Louisville, Ky 

Kersey, Bernice Ypsilant 

Kidd, Martha Orioi 

Kilgren, Linnea Tustii 

Kimmel, Edna St. John 

Kinde, Marion Kind 

King, Mary M Gladwii 

Kingsley, Etoscoe Byro 

Kinkead, Mrs. Ethel J Ypsilant 



STUDENTS 331 



intigh, Mildred Reading 

irby, J. N Decatur 

irchhofer, Julia Ann Arbor 

irk, Frances Howell 

etchenmaster, Hazel M. . Kings Mills 

lahn, Nellie Clarksville 

line,. Anna M Jackson 

.high, Rosalind Detroit 

llumpp, Helen Saline 

Inapp, Mrs. Katharine Bay City 

pappertz, Esther Canton, O. 

jnause. Carrie St. Louis 

jtiauss. Claran Clayton 

nickerbocker, Elsa Leslie 

nickerbocker, Wilma Leslie 

aight, Oda Manitou Beach 

night, Thelma M Hanover 

box, J. Morris Ypsilanti 

pengeter, Edna M Chelsea 

lollmorgen, Mrs. Carrie Fair Haven 

loslowsky, Beatrice Harbor Beach 

iranich, Benjamin F Gladwin 

irause, Lucy Bay City 

ironlund, Edna I Oscoda 

ronlund, Sadie Oscoda 

uder, Ruth Clinton 

usterer, Elizabeth A Chelsea 

ichajeski, M. M Detroit 

idd, Pauline Pittsford 

jidner, Muriel Ypsilanti 

;iFountain, Cecilia V Monroe 

igg, Mamie Kaleva 

lidlaw, Annette M Detroit 

jinib, Esther M Mason 

iimbert, Mabel C Columbiaville 

ambertson, Marion Lapeer 

uncaster, Dorothy Parma 

indon, Mildred B Custer 

line, Marian Addison 



£32 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Lang, Carl F Ypsilanti 

Lang, Marion, M Lansing 

Lanktree, Lucy B Lansing 

LaNone, Hortense Fostoria 

Larcom, Mary Bay City 

Lardie, Annette M Traverse City 

Larkin, Collette Iron Mountain 

LaRose, Lula Essexville 

Larsen, Mary Gowau 

Larson, Dagmar Cadillac 

Larson, Florence Manistee 

Larzelere, Helen E Clinton 

Latham, Doris J Tawas City 

Lattrill, Cora A Lake Placid, N. Y 

Lawler, Alice E Smith Creek 

La wing, Mildred River Rouge 

Lawr, Amy Alder 

Lawrence, Maude A Pontiat 

Lawson, George N Milar 

Leatherman, Mary M Hanovei 

Lee, Frank P Spring Arboi 

Leib, Floyd I Adriar 

Leisenring, Jennie Lansing 

Leisenring, Kenneth Rives junctior 

Leiter, Ruth A Ypsilant 

Lemmon, Dorris Litchfielc 

Lemmon, Pauline Litchfielc 

Lempke, Mary Algona< 

Lenhart, Elsie Brcckenridg< 

Leo, Louis Ypsilant 

Leonard, Catherine Parkcrsburg, W. Va 

Leppo, Martha Mansfield, 

Lester, Elmore Memphii 

Levy, Minnie; E Birminghan 

Lewis, Alonzo AddilOl 

Lewis, Emma Lou Danville, 111 

Lewis, Mary Ellen Rcadinj 

Lewis, Mary Helen Ypsilant 

Lewis, Mrs. N. A Dctroi 



STUDENTS 333 



lyner, Orville R Owendale 

|| Ike, Lillian Ypsilanti 

fodel, Fern M Ida 

llick, Gladys G North Branch 

Iticoln, Frances Jackson 

lidholm, Esther V Manistee 

Ijidsay, Eva Ypsilanti 

hn, Pauline M Williamston 

liiton, Mabel I Britton 

I! tie, Gertrude Muskegon Heights 

I tie, Linnia Prescott 

I! tie, Mildred LaVerne Port Huron 

I| tier, Helen Rives Junction 

Igg, Vera M Richmond 

Ing, Esther Fowler 

Ing, Josephine Fowler 

lag, Mary Newark, O. 

ling, Ruth Holly 

I|ag, Sylva L < Tawas City 

IJDney, Lester A Birmingham 

Ird, Lucille Clayton 

live, Claude Hale 

live, Esther Flushing 

Lve, Lucile Detroit 

I veil, Lucy Ypsilanti 

Iwary, Lena Steubenville, O. 

Livery, Mable Clarksville 

Ljidbom, Emma Manistee 

L|idquist, Leah Sunfield 

Ljidy, Evelyn A Yale 

Lidy, Lillian S Plymouth 

L,idy, Mabel Yale 

L;e, Guy Riga 

ik Reid O Riga 

Lj;e, Zell Riga 

Ltz, Margaret Yale 

Lmburn, Agnes Flint 

Ljnburn, Leila G Flint 

Inch, Agatha Gaylord 



334 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAS BOOK 

Lynn, Adaline Muskegon 

Lyons, Mrs. Esther Fowler Hillsdale 

Lytle, Irene B Saginaw 

Maddaugh, Florence I Boyne City 

Maddaugh, Nelle S Boyne City 

Maddaugh, Winnifred Boyne City 

Madill, Ethel Bay City 

Madill, Mildred Bay City 

Maegle, Minnie Ypsilanti 

Makey, Irene Caro 

Mansfield, M. Catherine Houghton 

Manson, Sophia St. Ignace 

Mapes, Edith Millington 

Marion, Clara Lansing 

Marks, Blanche E Bancroft 

Marley, Joseph A E. St. Louis, 111. 

Marquard, Lela G Granville, 0. 

Marschke, Emily R Ann Arbor 

Marsh, Evelyn Fenton 

Marsh, Florence Brown City 

Marshall, Maud Oak Grove 

Martin, Beulah S Pinckne^ 

Martin, Dorothy Britton 

Martin, Jennie P Manchestej 

Marwick, Mary Standisb 

Mater, Doris Clare 

Matson, Mildred Flini 

Matteson, Elizabeth Detroit 

Matthews, Mae Xenia, 

Matthias, Mildred Ann Arboi 

Maule, Myrtle Harbor Bead 

Maxson, Dora E Coldwatei 

Maxwell, Ella Pigeor 

Maxwell, Margaret Sault Ste. Mari( 

Maynard, Margaret McKie Alpem 

Maynard, Zelda Flin 

McAndless, Blanche Capa< 

McBratnie, Ann G Saginav 

McBride, Alice B ' Louisville, Ky 



STUDENTS 335 



McOarter, Flossie Gagetown 

McCloskey, Esther Chelsea 

McCloskey, Gerald Pinckney 

McCloskey, Helen Chelsea 

McClumpha, Genevieve Plymouth 

IjVlcClure, Linda Sandusky 

McClure, Veva S Rochester 

JMcCluskey, Leo Pinckney 

iMcClutchey, Ruth Onaway 

JMcComb, Mildred B Vassar 

McConnell, Alice B Cass City 

McConnell, Byrl Oxford, Ind. 

MacConnell, Jane Tecumseh 

McCorkle, Olive Toronto, O. 

McCoy, Inis Ruth Alma 

McCreery, Bess Grand Blanc 

McCrumb, M. Reva Grand Ledge 

McCulloch, Helen A DeTour 

McCully, Mary Pittsford 

McCumons, Alberta Brown City 

JMcCumsey, Mabel Clio 

JMacDonald, Clarence W Owosso 

jMacDonald, Frances V Deckerville 

McDonald, Nancy L Fair Grove 

iMcDonough, Mrs. Nellie Oak Grove 

IMcDougald, Rosena Onaway 

iMcEachen, Niaia Chesaning 

JMcEachern, Hugh Elkton 

jMcEldowney, Helen Elaine Caro 

jMcEldowney, Ida Caro 

McGiven, Evelyn Xenia, O. 

'MacGregor, Clifford Linden 

jMcGuinness, Marguerite Detroit 

jMcHenry, M. Hanna Lansing 

Mclnnis, Dorothy B . . . , Romeo 

Mclntyre, Edith Bay City 

Mclntyre, M. Mildred Adrian 

McKay, Etta Romeo 

McKeon, Alice P Fenton 



336 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

McKeon, Helen E Fenton 

McKenzie, Ethel A Port Huron 

MacKenzie, Margaret Alpena 

McKenzie, Ruth Chesaning 

McLachlan, Margaret Evart 

MacLarty, Kathryn G Cass City 

McLaughlin, Eileen Lansing 

McLeary, Agnes Toledo, 0. 

McLennan, Mabel Britton 

McLeod, Nora Grand Rapids 

McLouth, Bruce Ypsilanti 

McMann, Winnifred F. . Williamston 

McNab, Mrs. A. G Youngstown, 0. 

McNeil, Gladys Colling 

MacNeven, Anne Gaylord 

McPherson, Charles Robert Detroit 

McQueen, Harvey Howell 

MacRae, Christie Cass City 

McRoy, Eva Marlette 

McRoy, Vera M Marlette 

MacTavish, George '. Marlette 

McVean, Etta M Pontiac 

McVean, Gertrude Pontiac 

Medley, Cora B Chillicothe, 0. 

Medrow, Amelia Mancelona 

Meehan, Catherine D Port Huron 

Meehan, Margaret E Port Huron 

Mensen, Edna Algonac 

Merling, Ruth Coldwater 

Merrell, Elizabeth Roberts Owosso 

Merritt, Mrs. Nellie Bond Harbor Springs 

Meyer, Julia Alpena 

Michelson, Mayme L. . . . Grand Blanc 

Miles, Herma Fayette, 0. 

Miller, Alice Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Miller, Mrs. Alice St. Joseph 

Miller, Allen F Dundee 

Miller, Dorothy Romec 

Miller, Edna Rochestei 



STUDENTS 337 



Miller, Gladys DeTour 

Miller, Mabel Vassar 

j Miller, Madge E Flint 

I Miller, Mattie Armada 

Miller, H. Pauline Petersburg 

Miller, Una Helen Montgomery 

| Milligan, Genevieve M Clifford 

Milliman, Versa Coldwater 

\ Mitchell, Irene Belleville 

I Mitchell, Mary E Carsonville 

i Mitchell, Phoebe Weston, W. Va. 

| Mockler, Nola : Archbold, O. 

Moe, Emma Elk Rapids 

Mogk, Eugenie Ann Arbor 

Monaghan, Mary W Cheboygan 

Monaghan, Susan M Alpena 

Montgomery, Gladys Marlette 

Moore, Blanche Cromwell, Ind. 

Moore, Hazel Otter Lake 

Moore, Hazel L Dundee 

Moore, James W Ypsilanti 

Moore, Neva Quincy 

Moore, Retta Otisville 

Moorman, Miriam Ypsilanti 

Moran, Cecilia L Traverse City 

Moran, Zena Almont 

Moratti, Ciata R Stambaugh 

Morden, Mary Saline 

Morgan, Ola Carrollton, O. 

Morgan, William H Indian River 

Morhous, Frances Ypsilanti 

Morley, Mrs. Mary Carter Coloma 

Morris, Evelyn. . . , Corunna 

Morse, Sylvia Sand Creek 

Morton, Edith A Ann Arbor 

Moser, Dorothy Dundee 

Moses, Margaret Osseo 

Moss, Augusta Albion 

Moss, Helen A Flint 

43 



338 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Mott, Maynard Denton 

Moule, Genevieve E. . Ypsilanti 

Mover, Letha E Milan 

Muir, Catherine Milford 

Mulvena, Margaret A Alpena 

Muma, Bertha Lum 

Mumaw, Alda Butler, Ind. 

Mumby, Earle M Northport 

Mumford, Flora G Ypsilanti 

Munn, Mae T • Hubbell 

Murdick, Flossie Vassar 

Murdock, Charles F Detroit 

Murphy, Lelia Grayling 

Murphy, Mary Lyons Fenton 

Murphy, Nora Louisville, Ky. 

Murray, Gertrude I Ypsilanti 

Musch, Clara Howell 

Musolf, Elsie Tawas City 

Muyskens, Albert Grand Rapids 

Myers, Mrs. Nadine Tread well Burlington 

Myrmell, Blanche E . Whitehall 

Natzmer, Emma Bay City 

Natzmer, Freda A Bay City 

Naylor, Grace Paulding, 0. 

Neely, Olive Fairmont, W. Va, 

Nelson, Freda L : Dollarville 

Nelson, Matilda Dollarville 

Neumann, Elizabeth Marlette 

Neumann, Helene Saginaw 

Newell, Mygleetes Jackson 

Newman, Grace E Pigeon 

Newman, Norma St. Johns 

Newstead, Agnes Williamsburg 

Newstead, Maude Williamsburg 

Newton, Geraldine Ypsilanti 

Nichol, Lila Elkton 

Nichols, Hazel Romeo 

Nichols, Marguerite Romeo 

Nicholson, II. A., Jr Ionia 



STUDENTS 339 



Nicholson, Mrs. H. A., Jr Ionia 

Nickless, Bernice L Vassar 

Nickless, Ruth Vassar 

Nielsen, Lillia Muskegon 

Noack, Vera Alpena 

Noble, Martha Farmington 

Nofzinger, Marian E Archbold, O. 

Norris, Phyllis Ypsilanti 

Nott, Elwood E Stockbridge 

Nott, Mildred A Ann Arbor 

Nowland, Elizabeth Onaway 

Nunn, Albert H Flint 

Nye, Hazel Hudson 

O'Brien, Grace M Ypsilanti 

Odell, Harvey Clinton 

Ohmer, Nellie Yale 

O'Keefe, Elizabeth , Grand Rapids 

O'Leary, Estella M Merrill 

Oliver, Gladys Britton 

Olney, Bertha Moscow 

O'Neil, Ella Cheboygan 

Osgerby, J. K. . . , : East Tawas 

Osgerby, Mrs. Reine Torrey East Tawas 

Otis, Iris Milford 

Otto, Norma Buttons Bay 

Owen, Bernice Orion 

Ozanne, Martha Coconut Grove, Fla. 

Pace, Mrs. Amy E Port Huron 

Pace, Esther Port Huron 

Packard, Eva Au Gres 

Pahl, Mildred Ypsilanti 

Pahotski, Minnie Fort Smith, Ark. 

Paine, Ada M Ypsilanti 

Palmer, Beatrice Sebewaing 

Palmer, Florence L .Chelsea 

Palmer, Mrs. Olive Blissfield 

Palmiter, Arlia A , Milan 

Pangborn, Florence Bad Axe 

Pardon, Greta Maude Romeo 



340 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Parent, Joy Bad Axe 

Parker, Eliza B Brooklyn 

Parker, Louise E Hanover 

Parker, Myrtle Wickham Owosso 

Parks, Mabel A Nashville 

Parks, Ruth M Birmingham 

Parr, Kathleen M Dearborn 

Parry, Mildred Vassar 

Pasch, Erna St. Johns 

Pasch, Hilda C St. Johns 

Patson, Mauricee Almont 

Paul, Nellie Stockbridge 

Paulsen, Anna M Ironwood 

Paxton, Emma Michigan City, Ind. 

Peabody, Martha , Sunfield 

Peacock, Beryl Lake Odessa 

Pearson, Lydia M Muskegon 

Pechette, Teresa L. . Linden 

Peck, Bertha M Bozeman, Mont. 

Peck, Effie M Six Lakes 

Peck, Gertrude May Bozeman, Mont. 

Peck, May V Warren 

Pecure, Matilda Vassar 

Pecure, Wallice Vassar 

Peet, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Penoyar, Nelle Bangor 

Perkins, Esther Margaret Lake < 

Perkins, Marion F Lake < 

Perry, Esther M Middleville 

Perry, S. M Williamsburg 

Petch, Gertrude Coldwater 

Peters, Ethel C Brooklyn 

Peterson, Edith Brooklyn 

Peterson, Mamie A Manistee 

Pfau, Clara Howell 

Pfisterer, Matilda Ann Arbor 

Philipp, Gertrude C Bellaire 

Phillips, Forrest F South Lyon 

Phinney, Ada M Lorain, 0. 



STUDENTS 341 



Phinney, Dorothy Lorain, O. 

Phipps, Hilton V Otisville 

Pickell, Dorothy Cement City 

Pielemeier, John H Ann Arbor 

Pierce, Edith Plymouth 

Pierce, Edna M Emmett 

Pierce, Grace M Grand Ledge 

Pierce, Norma M Marine City 

Pierce, Vernon P Marine City 

Pinkerton, Doris B Vassar 

Piper, Miriam Paducah, Ky . 

Pittenger, Theda Milford 

Pittman, Mary Bernice Grass Lake 

Placeway, Nora Perry 

Piatt, Raye Roberts Marine City 

Poe, Alliene Fordyce Ypsilanti 

Poling, Eva M Hudson 

Pollard, Gladys •. ! Fowler 

Pollok, Viva M Dansville 

Poole, Gladys Elizabeth Holly 

Poole, Virginia A Clarkston 

Post, Frances D Dorr 

Post, Ruah L. . . . , Milliken 

Post, Violet Onaway 

Potter, Ada I Port Huron 

Potter, Nellie Ovid 

Potter, Olive Camden 

Potter, Ruth A. . Port Huron 

Powell, Alice Webberville 

Pringle, Dora M Sandusky 

Prisk, Irene M Houghton 

Proctor, Edith Romeo 

Proctor, Lottie Romeo 

Profrock, Edna Ortonville 

Prosser, Harold A Flint 

Prouty, Alberta New Lothrop 

Prouty, Charles F Unionville 

Pruden, Ruth M Petersburg 

Pryor, Margaret Portland 



342 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Pullen, Laura B Coldwater 

Pung, Beatrice St. Johns 

Purcell, Ruby A Deckerville 

Quillman, Howard W Capac 

Quinn, Francis Morrice 

Rachuth, Augusta Saginaw 

Radeke, Clara Saginaw 

Rademacher, Clara Saginaw 

Rae, Edna A Essexville 

Ramsey, Bernice Marlette 

Ramseyer, Florence Morenci 

Randolph, Mrs. Harriet E Coldwater 

Randolph, Janet E Coldwater 

Rathbun, Doris L Lyons, 0. 

Rathbun, Marie Lyons, 0. 

Rathka, Hazel Rochester 

Ratti, Celestine M Ann Arbor 

Ranels, Letilla V : Winchester, Ky. 

Rauschenbach, Sarah LaPorte, Ind. 

Ray, Fern M Metamora, 0. 

Raymond, Aleta Charlotte 

Raymond, Beatrice C Dansville 

Reader, Onahbelle Millard Ypsilanti 

Reagan, Iamba Edmore 

Reamer, Claribel South Lyon 

Reavey, Doris O Caro 

Reddick, Helen Frances Birmingham 

Redmond, Lila Pontiac 

Reed, Gertrude ISmith Flint 

Reese, Vivian Saginaw 

Reeser, Maxine Elba 

Regan, Nellie Yale 

Reid, Alice Ypsilanti 

Reid, Ethel Dexter 

Reid, Maybelle A Ypsilanti 

Reilly, Loretta Erie 

Reiman, Margaret Ypsilanti 

Reiser, Anna E Clinton 

Reiser, Josephine Cadillac 



STUDENTS 343 



Reiser, Kate Cadillac 

Reiser, Leora M Clinton 

Icisner, Lillian Saginaw 

Rendel, Myrtle Britton 

leaner, Viola Vassar 

{cqua, Amy C Corunna 

Reynolds, Mrs. Jennie Romeo 

Reynolds, John T Berville 

Reynolds, Marguerite L Britton 

lice, Orrin S Alpena 

Richards, Marshall F Oak Grove 

Richards, Sherman Oak Grove 

Richardson, Irene Pinckney 

Richardson, Lois West Branch 

{ichardson, Lucile M Owosso 

Richardson, Mabel Niles 

Richardson, Mary West Branch 

Richardson, Ruth Port Hope 

Richart, E. L Clinton 

Richert, Barbara R t Bay City 

Richmond, Laura Gregory 

Richter, Liha M Saginaw 

Riggs, Martha Jonesville 

Riley, Anna Ypsilanti 

Riley, Thelma I Jackson 

Ringel, Elsie Manistee 

Ringel, Minnie Manistee 

Roberts, Elizabeth Ypsilanti 

lobertson, Lulu Lansing 

Robertson, Marten Blissfield 

lobinson, Blanche , New Albany, Ind. 

Robinson, Gertrude Highland 

Robinson, Harold K Albion 

Robinson, Nona M Standish 

Robinson, Ruth Standish 

Robinson, Ruth Traverse City 

Roche, Alice A Pinckney 

lodesiler, LaVern M .-. Owosso 

lodgers, Bernice Lake Odessa 



344 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Rodgers, Gladys Lake Odessa 

Roe, Iila Mae Plymouth 

Roehm, Cora Ypsilanti 

Rogers, Beulah L Armada 

Rogers, Mrs. Lucy A Ypsilanti 

Rogers, Margery Holton 

Rohlf , Madeline Saline 

Rohm, Olive Ortonville 

Roof, Mildred Fowlerville 

Root, Harriett D Ypsilanti 

Rose, Mrs. Lulu Flint 

Rose, Ruth Marie Traverse City 

Rose, William Ray Morenci 

Rossman, Edna Howell 

Rossman, Vera Howell 

Roth, Adolph J Clarksville 

Rothwell, Mrs. Anna Saginaw I 

Rouget, Frances Palmyra 

Rowan, Ethel M Parma 

Rowe, Lettie Grand Rapids 

Rowland, Alice L Lawrence 

Rowley, Hilda Washington 

Rowley, F. Pearl Laingsburg 

Rowley, Sadye Laingsburg 

Rowlison, Eunice Concord 

Rubel, Anne Pauline Flint 

Rumble, Sadie Deckerville 

Russell, Arlo Brooklyn 

Russell, Claud Ypsilanti 

Russell, Josephine M Ann Arbor 

Russell, Lillian E Grass Lake 

Russell, Mina D Salin< 

Rutledge, Adelaide F Otisvill< 

Sage, Ethel Lennon 

Sager, Marguerite Jackson 

Sampson, Margucretta Kind< 

Samuelson, Marie East T;i\\ 

Sanborn, Myrtle New Loth* 

Sandersfield, Ruth Clk 






STUDENTS 345 



Sangren, Paul V Clio 

Sangren, Mrs. Paul V Clio 

Gangster, M. Avis Decker 

Sarles, Alice Allen 

father, Mrs. Lida Birmingham 

Sat tort hwaite, Dorothy Chelsea 

Sattler, Katherine Charlotte 

battler, Marion Charlotte 

Saunders, Saracenece H Detroit 

Saur, Helen Newark, O. 

Savage, Ethel Elkhart, Ind. 

Savage, Melba I Capac 

vividge, Marian Reed City 

Savidge, Minnie L Youngstown, O. 

•lawyer, Mary A Ovid 

Sayler, Augusta Big Rapids 

navies, Harriet Owosso 

kshaaf, Helma J East Tawas 

>chenk, Grace M Chelsea 

k'hlicher, L. R Laingsburg 

Schmid, Mabel Petersburg 

>chmitt, Josephine Perry 

>chneider, Esther J Washington 

Schneider, Goldie A Boyne City 

Schneider, Lela Washington 

Schneider, Mabel P W^ebberville 

Schneider, Ruth Washington 

^chopp, Marie DeTour 

; chroeder, Daisy Millington 

Ichroen, Clara C Saline 

; chroen ; Luella M Ann Arbor 

Ichubert, Lucile M Holly 

; chultz, Robert F Ypsilanti 

Schulz, Mildred Cheboygan 

Ichulze, Edna M Nashville 

;<:human, Adela Bay City 

►chuarzkopf, Esther Lapeer 

. Frank Romulus 

>cott, Frank F Ypsilanti 



346 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Scott, Margaret H Ashtabula, 0. 

Scott, Margaret M Shelldrake 

Scott, Marguerite Vanderbilt 

Scott, Marion Vanderbilt 

Scott, Treopia V Little Rock, Ark. 

Scovill, S. Mary Hudson 

Scovill, Mrs. Winifred Pioneer, 0. 

See, Gladys Durand 

Seely, Ethel Camden 

Seeman, Clara V Covington, Ky. 

Seim, Anna Brighton 

Selby, Lelah M Elba 

Selden, Blanche Pontiac 

Sellers, Marjorie Akron 

Sellers, Martha Akron 

Severance, Helen Haslett 

Sexton, Gracia Laingsburg 

Sexton, Marjorie Laingsburg 

Shaffer, Mary F .Lansing 

Shane, Gladys Traverse City 

Shattuck, Alice Pontiac 

Shaver, Charlotte B - Terre Haute, Tnd. 

Shaw, Myandia Grand Ledge 

Shawley, George E Ypsilanti 

Shawley, Laura L Ypsilanti 

Shea, Kathryne Laurium 

Shelly, Marie Whittaker 

Shepard, Feme W Eagle 

Shepard, Jessamine Bay City 

Shepard, Ruth L Otisville 

Shephard, Fern I • .Belleville 

Sherd, Ethel Flint 

Sherman, Blanche Evart 

Sherman, Celeste Detroit 

Sherrard, Vivian Ousted 

Sherwood, Edythe Walled Lak< 

Shields, Ruth Gayloi 

Shigley, Anna B Jamestown, 0. 

Shultz, Erraa BILssfield 



STUDENTS 347 



Shuman, Ruby Sturgis 

Siiterson, Nellie Osceola 

Sill, Margaret Traverse City 

Simmon, Mrs. Mabel Mancelona 

Simmonds, Reeta Otisville. . 

Sipperley, Bethel Rochester 

Sipple, Byrnina Cedar Springs 

Sischo, Sarah Leonard 

Sisson, Maude A Hastings 

Sister Albina Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Angela Marie Adrian 

Sister Ann Dominico Adrian 

Sister Columbkille Adrian 

Sister Corona Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Eva Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Francis DeSales Adrian 

Sister Francis Xavier Monroe 

Sister Grace Immaculata Adrian 

Sister Henrietta Marie Adrian 

Sister Leone Therese Adrian 

Sister Loretta Marie Adrian 

Sister Marie Bernadette Monroe 

Sister Marie Isabel Monroe 

Sister Marie Lucile Monroe 

Sister Marie Therese Monroe 

Sister Marie Therese Adrian 

Sister M. Adele Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Adelle Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Aegidia Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Albertine Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Alice Clare Monroe 

Sister Mary Alice Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Alma Adrian 

Sister M. Alphonsus Adrian 

Sister Mary Ambrose Monroe 

Sister M. Angeline Adrian 

Sister Mary Annunciata Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Aquilina Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Mary Assumpta Adrian 



348 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Sister M. Augustine Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Baptista Adrian 

Sister M. Beatrice Adrian 

Sister M. Berchmans Adrian 

Sister M. Bertha Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Bertrand Adrian 

Sister M. Borromeo Adrian 

Sister Mary Carlotta Adrian 

Sister Mary Carmelita Adrian 

Sister M. Carmella Adrian 

Sister M. Celeste Adrian 

Sister Mary Clare Adrian 

Sister M. Clarissa Adrian 

Sister M. Coelina Adrian 

Sister M. Concepta Adrian 

Sister M. DePaul . . ■ Adrian 

Sister M. DePazzi Adrian 

Sister M. Dorothy Racine, Wis. 

Sister Mary Eulalia Adrian 

Sister Mary Fidelis - Adrian 

Sister M. Generosa Adrian 

Sister Mary Genevieve Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Geralda Adrian 

Sister M. Gizelle Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Gonzoga Adrian 

Sister M. Hermana Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Hildegard Adrian 

Sister M. Honora Jack Monroe 

Sister M. Hyacintha Monroe 

Sister M. Jordan Adrian 

Sister M. Juliana Monroe 

Sister Mary Kathleen Adrian 

Sister Mary Lawrence Monroe 

Sister M. Leocadia Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Leona Racine, Wis. 

r AI. Leonarda Adrian 

Sister M. Lucieo Monroe 

Sist er Mary Lucina Adrian 

i r M. Lucretia Adrian 



STUDENTS 349 



Sisf er Mary Lucy Adrian 

Sister M. Lumena Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Lydia Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sisf er Mary Mannes Adrian 

Sister M. Marietta Monroe 

Sisf or M. Martina Adrian 

Sisf er M. Matilda Racine, Wis. 

Sfoter M. Paschal Adrian 

Sisf er Mary Paul Adrian 

Sisf or Mary Pius Adrian 

Sisf or M. Raymonda Adrian 

Sister M. Redempta Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Reparata Adrian 

Sister M. Rita Marie Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Rosalita Monroe 

Sister M. Rose Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. St. John Francis Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister M. Thomas Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Urban Adrian 

Sister Mary Verena Racine, Wis. 

Sister M. Vincentia Adrian 

Sister M. Xavier Racine, Wis. 

Sister Mary Yvo Racine, Wis. 

Sister Mildred Marie Adrian 

Sister Modesta Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Rosaire - Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Rose Clement Adrian 

Sister Rose Ethel Adrian 

Sister Seraphim Manitowoc, Wis. 

Sister Stella Marie Adrian 

Skeels, Jennie Whitehall 

Slaght, Nona Grand Blanc 

Slattery, Marie North Branch 

Slaybaugh, Freida Pittsford 

Slough, Hazel G Cement City 

Small, Hazel L Highland Park 

Smith, Bertha I Durand 

Smith, Bessie Onaway 

Smith, Clara Eloise t Marietta, O. 



350 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Smith, Edgar W Wyandotte 

Smith, Elsie Imlay City 

Smith, Emogene L Ypsilanti 

Smith, Etha L Owosso 

Smith, Floyd L Cedar Springs 

Smith, Gladys Ypsilanti 

Smith, Helen Jane Ypsilanti 

Smith, Helen Milan 

Smith, Inez Onaway 

Smith, Irene Howell 

Smith, Jack Howell 

Smith, Leona New Lothrop 

Smith, W. Leon Rochester 

Smith, Lola Blanchard Clintor 

Smith, Lucy M Pontia( 

Smith, G. Marie Seneca 

Smith, Mina L Brown Cit} 

Smith/ Winifred Elktor' 

Smith, Zelma F Ypsilant 

Smoll, Helen L Jaspei 

Snee, Ethel , Dellroy, 

Snepp, Venus Pontia< 

Snidecor, Beryl Ypsilant 

Snider, Floyd F .Elktoi 

Snoddy, Pauline Brittoi 

Snook, Homer B Almon 

Snyder, Catherine Green vill« 

Snyder, Hazel Pioneer, 

Solomon, Jeanettc Whitchal 

Sommers, Florence E Pioneer, 

Southom, Leona Vassa 

Sparling, Estelle Ann Arbo 

Sparling, Susie Bad Ax 

Spaulding, Byron W Rocheste 

Spencer, Carroll Imlay Cit, 

Spencer! Lehla Clark Flin 

Spencer, Leo J Rushto 

Spencer, Nellie Almon 

Spencer, Roscoe M Rushto 



STUDENTS 351 



Spillers, Linnie Flint 

jjpooner, El hel Battle Creek 

Jprague, Addie B Spring Arbor 

Spfing, Lillian Alabaster 

Spring, Marietta Pontiac 

Spring, Orpha Pittsford 

^pringborn, Ethel Romeo 

Squires, Evalyn F Coldwater 

>quires, Florence Lansing 

•Uacer, Bessie Flint 

>taeb, Minnie Ann Arbor 

>taebler, Alta Turner 

>tafTord, Thelma I North Adams 

^afford, Viola North Adams 

>tahl, Anna Margaret Alpena 

^taley, Leola Oak Grove 

>tamprler, Lillian C Fife Lake 

>tanka, Victoria A. M Houghton 

tanley, Ruth Ypsilanti 

tanton, Christine Ovid 

ttapish, Marian Flushing 

Starr, Kathryn Ypsilanti 

Stauch, Rose K Detroit 

Staudacher, Ethel Bay City 

Stay, Ruby Plymouth 

5t. Clair, Gladys Marine City 

headman, Hazel E Harbor Beach 

5teffens, Matie Vassar 

>telzer, Anna Howell 

Uepanski, Martha Bay City 

>tepnitz, Mabelle Dryden 

tevens, Edna Metz, W. Va. 

Stevens, Mary C Mancelona 

Stevenson, Lucy A Gaines 

teward, Mavia Rochester 

tewart, Mabel Findlay, O. 

tickler, Marian Laingsburg 

'tiles, Clara E Fenton 

Wilson, Maude McComb Vassar 



352 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Stinchcomb, Bina Sunfield 

Stinchcomb, Olga E Sunfield 

Stitt, Elmer R Ypsilanti 

Stocking, Mrs. Anna Grace Ann Arbor 

Stocks, Ethel E Nashville, Tenn. 

Stone, Marcia , Hudson 

Stonehouse, Ethel J Bellaire 

Stoner, Alice Byron 

Storey, Julia M Evart 

Storrs, Bessie Aigonac 

Stoutenberg, Neva J Deckerville 

Stowell, Bertha Saranac 

Strand, Lily Stambaugh 

Strong, Mildred F Flushing 

Strong, Ruth Millington 

Stroud, Edna Akron 

Sturges, Christine Ann Arbor 

Sturgis, Jennie Fenton 

Sturgis, Mary Rockford 

Stutz, Caroline A Goshen, Ind. 

Subora, Marie L Ludington 

Suit, Mildred Shelton Muskegon 

Sullivan, Ella Attica 

Sullivan, Emma Irene Ypsilanti 

Sullivan, Irene Detroit 

Sullivan, Katherine Attica 

Sullivan, Leila L Shelby 

Sundling, Esther V Manistee 

Sundling, Goldie Manistee 

Sutton, Clare M Blaine 

Sutton, Inez Sarah Ann Arbor 

Swarthout, Ethel Laingsburg 

Swarthout, Gladys Laingsburg 

Swartz, Arnold F LaSalle 

Sweet, Ora Flint 

Swihart, Grace Reading 

ttwitz, Florence Linden 

Switzer, Marguerette Muskegon 

Switaer, Vkla Belle Morcnci 



STUDENTS 



wope, Mario Monroe 

■foam, Florence Elkton 

Win 1 1 1, Frances Elkton 

^abor, Elsie Pickford 

"ague, Margaret Auburn 

^ait, Mabel Fairgrove 

St, Mildred Fairgrove 

MMor, Doris E Traverse City 

^aylor, Evelyn Leslie 

^aylor, Rachel E Lansing 

wider, Emogene L Erie 

^eets, Mae Sandusky 

>nnant, Dorothy M Hubbell 

^hayer, Anna W Farmington 

Thayer, Howard C Williamston 

rhayer, Ruth Webberville 

rhom, Margaret H Port Huron 

rhomas, Carrie E Hillsdale 

rhomas, A. DeLong Ypsilanti 

rhomas, J. Richard Ypsilanti 

rhomas, Vivian Jackson 

rhompson, Adren Arvel Central Lake 

rhompson, F. Arleen Rochester 

rhompson, Gladys I Capac 

rhoms, Alice Ypsilanti 

rhomson, Dorothy Clinton 

rhornton, H. Lucille Farmington 

rhorsen, Clare East Jordan 

rhorsen, Signa East Jordan 

rhreadgould, Francis A New Boston 

rhroop, Arlie Vassar 

Fibbens, Florence G Clayton 

rice, Cecile I Yale 

Hedeman, Agnes Linden 

righe, Lulu Bay City 

rill, Albert W Saugatuck 

ritus, Edwyna Gregory 

Ibbey, Myrtle Corunna 

robin, M. Veronica Cheboygan 

45 



354 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 






Todd, M. Gertrude DimondaL 

Todd, Marian CharIott< 

Tong, Cheu Lang Chusan, Chinj 

Torrant, Marian J Parmj 

Townsend, Mrs. Elizabeth Stockbridgi 

Townsend, Kitt M . Greenville, 

Townsend, Ransom S Ypsilant 

Trainor, Louise A Ferndal 

Trankler, Alta M Grand Rapid 

Treash, Etta L Akron, 

Trelfa, Lucy M Alpen. 

Trevarthen, M yrle Quinnese 

Trim, Gladys M St. Clai 

Tropp, Cynthia Osse* 

True, Tressa Bad Ax 

Tubbs, Harlow Orcutt Ann Arbo 

Tucker, Lenore Toledo, C 

Tucker, Mabel Salin, 

Tupper, Feme Pinckne 

Turner, Ellen E Milfor 

Turner, Naomi Morristown, Tenr 

Turnley, Ednah M Jerom 

Tuttle, Cleora Stockbridg 

Twitchell, Ruby E Dimondal 

Tyler, Myrta L Vermontvill 

Ude, Herman Detro: 

Ulmer, Blanch Petersbur 

Underhill, Helen South Lyo 

Urquhart, Bernice. . Bad Ax 

Van Antwerp, L. B Lakevie- 

Van Avery, Russell G Redfor 

Vandawaker, Theron C Metamoi 

Van Horn, Hattie Tawas Cit 

Van Ness, Myrtle A Onawa 

Van Schoick, Vivian B Bellevil 

Van Sickle, Lilas J Malvi 

Van Vleet, Gladys St. Johr 

Vasold, Charlotte Vasa 

Vedder, Almon Will 



STUDENTS 355 



I Kr. OUen M Willis 

Y< man. Jeanette Holland 

Vniilya, Alice Onaway 

Dorothy Grand Haven 

Y hauer, Louise Ypsilanti 

V rut, Grace Flint 

Mab^l Mannington, W. Va. 

\. . Marie D Montrose 

Y. rhorst, Lena Flint 

Y] »man, Edgar L Yale 

\\ 'sworth, Fannie Ellen Petersburg 

\Y Isworth, Rachael J Petersburg 

\Y.rgoner, Mae Pinnebog 

\\:ot, Reva Hillsdale 

gnes M Cheboygan 

.1, Reva M St. Johns 

\Y ker, Beula Barry ton 

\Y ker, Howard K Plymouth 

Wker, John Ethel Morristown, Tenn. 

\Y ker, Marguerite Hillman 

place, Edna Carsonville 

p lace, Grace Bay City 

\Y iace, Guy E Carsonville 

\Y lace, Raymond H Sandusky 

\Y pole, Branson A Ypsilanti 

\Y<h, Elizabeth Allen 

Mrs. Lillian M Saginaw 

AY 3h, Nettie L Lansing 

Ilussel Clarkston 

. Blanche V Morrice 

. Grace Page Flint 

p ven, Pansy Leonard 

md, Clara B Ann Arbor 

Hzabeth Port Huron 

• Nelle Louisville, Ky. 

p dwell, Cornelia Lansing 

>\ i Iwell, Gladys K Lansing 

Edna M Davison 

p nor, Flossie M Reading 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Warren, Cora , . . . . Dearbc 

Watling, Esther Ba 

Watson, Elizabeth E Britt 

Watson, Lorene Alpe 

Watson, Norma Algor 

Way, Bertha A Port Hui. 

Wearne, Elizabeth Alleg 

Weaver, Jean '. . .7 Kingsl 

Webb, Lottie M Pont 

Webb, May L Ypsila 

Weber, Sylvia L Elk] 

Webster, E. Lucile Bellev 5 

Webster, Myrtle Mi 

Weeks, Victoria , A7 

Weidemann, Christine Oneka I 

Weidemann, Hattie Onefo t 

Weil, Dorothy L Richm I 

Weiler, Mrs. Eva MayV* 

Weiler, Margaret May^ 3 

Weilneau, Alice Due i 

Weitbrecht, Emma Ann Ai n 

Weitzel, Alice Bad e 

Weksler, Dora Elb t 

Welberry, Agnes Mil d 

Welberry, Helen Mild 

Welch, Catharine New Philadelphia ), 

Welch, Pearl B Johannes) % 

Wellington, Anna F Lewi >n 

Wells, Alfreda Bel i| 

Welman, S. P Middle le 

Wemple, Bertha Dans le 

Werth, Edith Arn la 

Wessman, Anna Mancc is 

West, Anna L Conf 

West, Opal I '■ 

Westcott, Waive North A< 

Whale, Ink Casst 

Wheeler, Caroline A AnnM 

Wheeler, Don 8 Yps:ri 






1 



STUDENTS 357 



[heeler, Mrs. D. W Lewiston 

! heeler, Mrs. F. J Ypsilanti 

^heeler, Nellie J Tawas City 

Mielan, Alice Tecumseh 

hippie, Ruth Sebewaing 

hippie, Virginia I Jackson 

hitaker, Beatrice Dryden 

hitaker, Lucile Dryden 

hite. Alice D Alabaster 

bite, Anne M Saginaw 

hite, J. G Clio 

hite, Mabel Flint 

hite, Ora Frances Parkersburg, W. Va. 

hiteley, Katherine Klyde Greenville, O. 

hitman, Winona Springport 

hitmore, Wilma Buchtel, O. 

hitney, Clarence Port Sanilac 

hitney, Florence H Wayne 

hitney, Marie Reading 

hittingham, Esther E Detroit 

ickett, Lucille Elmira 

ickland, Emma Whitehall 

,1, Linda Louisville, Ky . 

igie, Hazel Allchin Webberville 

ilber, Geraldine Blissfield 

ilcox, Edgar H Traverse City 

ilcox, Edna Traverse City 

ilcox, Ethel M Wayne 

ilcox, Ora Lansing 

ildern, K. Edna Port Huron 

ilhoite, Nelle R Oklahoma City, Okla. 

ilkinson, Muriel Saginaw 

illiams, Bernice Brown City 

illiams, Boyd N Medina, N. Y. 

illiams, Lurissa Owosso 

illiams, Pauline Redford 

illiams, Ruth Durand 

illiams, Saidee M Flint 

illiams, Sarah E Saginaw 



358 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Williamson, Althea Ypsill 

Williamson, Ethel Marie McBrid 

Williamson, Ruth A Ypsilan 

Willis, Lillian E Bay Ci 

Willits, Florence Ann Arb 

Wills, Bernice Mi] 

Wilmarth, Lena Batav 

Wilson, Beatrice Jacks 

Wilson, Editha E Mil 

Wilson, Frances Millingt 

Wilson, Gladys Rom 

Wilson, Maud Bella 

Wilson, Merle Bella 

Wilson, Neva Dun( 

Wilson, Ruth M Litchfi 

Wiltse, Norris G Tekons 

Wiltshire, Charlotte Onaw 

Winborn, Carrie Fosto 

Wines, Dessie Wal 

Wines, Elizabeth How 

Wing, Marie Beatrice Hastin 

Winkler, Elizabeth I Detr 

Winn, Ethel Kings M 

Winslow, Irma lor 

Winston, R. A Sagim 

Winters, Leonie M Vanderb 

Wisner, Helen B Flushi 

Withenbury, Mrs. Iva J Shell 

Withenbury, Ray L Shel 1 

Witmar, Edna Lyo 

Witt, Leona E Pe 

Witteveen, Dorothy Holla 

Witting, Amanda H Ann Ar 

Witt kop, Carl E Dun 

Wolfe, Eldon Ortonv 

Wolfe,.Leslie C Rapid Ri 

Wolfe, Ralph A Ith 

Wolter, ( Jlara Schmid Ypsila 

Wonderlie, Clair Leona 



STUDENTS 359 



Wood, Avery C Blanchard 

Wood, H. A Scottville 

Wood, Harold R Ithaca 

Wood, Helen C Ithaca 

Wood, Nora L Romulus 

1, Ruth Scottville 

Wooden, Bernicc Hanover 

Wooden, Evelyn Hanover 

Woodliffe, Vera Concord 

Woods, Vera V Harbor Beach 

Woodward, Agnes G Port Huron 

Woodworth, Ellen M Owosso 

Woodworth, Esther L Walled Lake 

Wooldridge, Mary E Belding 

Woolverton, Eleanor Grand Rapids 

Workman, Catherine Deckerville 

Wren, W. W Grand Rapids 

Wright, Ramona Jonesville 

Wyatt, Evelyn Standish 

Wyatt, Lucretia E Fort Smith, Ark. 

Yager, Gretchen * Paulding, O. 

Yager, Marie G Onaway 

Yeagiey, Elva Munson 

Yocum, Frances Addison 

Young, Esther Van Wert, O. 

Young, Margaret Onaway 

Young, Reuben L Milan 

Younglove, W. H Adrian 

Youngquist, Martha. Whitehall 

Yuhse, Charlotte E Manistee 

Yuill, Nell D Vanderbilt 

Zapf, H. Martha Traverse City 

Ziegler, Augusta K Saginaw 

Ziegler, Frances B Saginaw 

Ziegler, John G Unionville 

Zielesch, Florence C Romeo 

Zielinski, Eva Bay City 

Zielinski, Rose R Bay City 

Zimmer, Regina H St. Clair 



360 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Zimmerman, R. Frank Ortonville 

Zinzo, Herbert L Yale 

Zipp, Ethel G Petoskey 



LIST OF GRADUATES 
DECEMBER, 1920, MARCH, JUNE, AND AUGUST, 1921 



Abbott, Helen Burdette Life Aug. 

Abelman, Sarah Life June 

Adams, Blanche Beam Graded. .June 

Adams, Helen Caroline Life June 

Adams, Margaret E Life June 

Adams, Myrna Life June, 

Alkire, M. Alberta Life June 

Anderson, I. Millicent Life Aug. 

Andrus, Wildarene B. S June 

Ankebrant, John A Life June 

Ardner, Alma G..' Life June 

Ardner, Hazel V Life June 

Arthur, Iva D Life June 

Arthur, Norman A. B. . . . June 

Ashdon, Lyla Graded. .Aug. 

Asman, Mabel Lydia Life Aug. 

Austin, Franklin H. Life Mar. 

Baker, Meta E Life June 

Ball, Gladys M Life June 

Ballamy, Hannah Adeline A. B. . . .Aug 

Ballard, M. Esther Life June, 

Barber, Margery Eva Life June 

Hainan!, Myrtle L Graded.. Aug. 

Barnes, Marion E Life June, 

Bartlett, Rita E3 Life Aug. 

Beach, Elizabeth I' 1 Life June 

Bearinger, Margaret Edna Life Aug. 

Beck, BelgaW Life June 

Bemis, 10. ()., ,lr A. B.. . .June 

Bennett, Mildred Irene Life June 



21 Coldwater 

21 Bessemer 

21 Mancelona 

21 New Boston 

21 Wheaton, 111. 

21 Lansing 

21 Ypsilant 

21 BoyneCity 

21 Ann Arbor 

21 Sebewaing 

21 Shepherd 

21 Shepherd 

21 Rose City 

21 Detroit 

21 Mancelona 

21 Bay City 

21 Laingsburg 

21 Marine City' 

21 Lennon 

21 Bay City 

21 Cedar Springs 

21 Stanton 

21 Mancelona 

21 Almont 

21 '. Saginaw 

21 Clinton 

21 Saginaw 

21 Baraga 

21 Temperance 

21 Plymouth 



STUDENTS 



361 



innetts, Gertrude Ellen Life June, 

nnie, Lillian Life June, 

nson, Ella S Life June, 

atley, Beulah E Life Aug., 

srg, Nellie Graded. .Dec., 

•rry ? Myrtle Marie Life Aug., 

■st, E. Fern Hewitt Life Aug., 

st, Martha S Life June, 

nns, Ruth Elizabeth Life Aug., 

ssell, Lottie Agnes Life June, 

fctrich, Elsa T Graded. . Aug., 

akeley, Marion Life Aug., 

eckner, Lillian Life. . ... .Aug., 

loom, Emmaretta L Life June, 

agert, Lora Alice Life Dec., 

;>hnet, Helen Viola Life June, 

^les, Genevieve Ruth Life Mar., 

owen, Jennie E Graded. .Aug., 

oyd, F. Jennie Graded. .Mar., 

raddock, Grace Lucile Cons. . . .June, 

radford, Carrie Louise Graded. .Aug., 

radley, Mary E Graded. .Aug., 

radley, Ragna Life June, 

ranch, Jennie Mae Life June, 

ranch, M. Marian Life June, 

rcakey, James Ritchison, Jr. . . A. B. . . . Mar., 

rewbaker, Nellie Holbrook. . .Life Dec, 

rinker, Mable Fern Life June, 

rock, Grace Hope Life Aug., 

rooks, Bertha Life Mar., 

rooks, Dorothy L Life Dec, 

rown, Alice Evelyn Life Dec, 

rown, Arnold W A. B. . . . June, 

rown, Ruth Henney Life June, 

rusie, Muriel Elinore Life June, 

udd, Esther R Life June, 

iudd, Myrtle Florence B. S Aug., 

►urk, I. Lucile Life June, 

>urling, Lyle Helen Life June, 



'21 Bessemer 

'21 SaultSte. Marie 

'21 Frankfort 

'21 Lum 

'20 Bessemer 

'21 Grand Rapids 

'21 Flint 

'21 Imlay City 

'21 Buchanan 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 Lake Linden 

'21 Mancelona 

'21 .Toledo, O. 

'21 Maple City 

'20 Ann Arbor 

'21 Lansing 

'21 Saginaw 

'21 Howard City 

'21 Vermont ville 

'21 Tawas City 

'21 Pontiac 

'21 Port Huron 

'21 Bessemer 

'21 Saginaw 

'21 Orion 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'20 Ann Arbor 

'21.. St. Petersburg, Fla. 

'21 Whitehall 

'21 Birmingham 

'20 Omer 

'20 Caro 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 Perrinton 

'21 North Branch 

'21 Perrysburg, O. 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 St. Johns 

'21 Calumet 



362 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR HOOK 



Burns, Eva Madeline Cons. . . . June, 

Burr, Doris Esther Life June, 

Burton, Grace Walker Life June, 

Butler, Helen D Life Aug., 

Butt, Martha E Graded. .Aug., 

Buttolph, Gertrude Margaret. . Life Aug., 

Button, Frances Life Aug., 

Bycraf t, Harriet Bennett Life June, 

Callahan, Leo Francis Life June, 

Campbell, Anna Lou Life June, 

Campbell, Luella Graded.. June, 

Carlson, Martha M Life Aug., 

Carpenter, Bessie Life Aug., 

Carpenter, Joseph Life Aug., 

Carpenter, Ralph H A. B. . . . June, 

Carpenter, Ralph R Life Dec, 

Carr, Eleanor Life. . , . .Mar., 

Case, Bernice M Graded. .June, 

Case, Mary Conger Life Mar., 

Cashmore, Pearl M Cons. . . .June, 

Casler, Doris Regina Life June, 

Chadwick, E. Marie Life Mar., 

Chaffee, M. Joyce Life June, 

Challis, Hazel Mary Life June, 

Chambers, Mabel Dale Life Dec, 

Chapman, Nila G. . . Life June, 

Chatfield, Ethyl Louise Life June, 

Childs, John Robert Life June, 

Chinnock, Irene M Life June, 

Christopher, Mary Louise Life Mar., 

Clapper, M. Arbutus Life June, 

Clark, Belle Campbell Life Aug., 

Clark, Loretta E Graded.. June, 

Cleveland, Nannette Leslie .... Life June, 

Clifford, Lillian Life June, 

Coad, Myrtle Life June, 

Coates,.Mary II Life Aug., 

Coatta, George Leslie Life June, 

Cochran, Julia G Graded.. Mar., 



21 Oil City, ft 

21 Central Lak 

21 Detroi 

21 Port Hiiro, 

21 Eckfor 

21 Portland, OrJ 

21 Ypsilaml 

21 Ypsilaml 

21 Owoss * 

21 Jackso t 

21 GaylorJ 

21 St. Loui I 

21 Pontial 

21 Kalamazo x 

21 Howard Cit; J 

20 Pontial 

21 Pontial 

21 Benzoni t? 

21 Ypsilanll 

21 WyandottE 

21 .Ann Arbo*j 

21 .'.MaifcJ 

21 Ovi< 

21 Ypsilanf] 

20 Alveda, Cy 

21 Greenvilll 

21 Grand Rapid J 

21 Vermontvill 

21 Graylihl 

21 Canton, 111 

21 Baldwiij 

21 Port Huroij 

21 Whitehal] 

21 Grand Rapid 

21 Iron Mountaii 

21 Detroi 1 

21 Flin 

21 ManceloruE 

21 Hortoi 



STUDENTS 



363 



hran, Medora M Graded.. Aug., 

l\ Bessie Irene Life Aug., 

C egrove, Leona R Life Dec., 

Ceman, Leone M Life Dec., 

dlier, Helen Graded.. Aug., 

Cilins, Marion P Life Aug., 

Qvin, Chrystal G A. B. . . .Aug., 

Hnfort, Elizabeth R Graded.. Aug., 

Ciat, John M Life June, 

Diners, Katherine M Life June, 

C irad, Bessie Life June, 

Cirad, Emma R Cons. . . .June, 



ley, Leota Marie Life June, 

mey, Herbert William Life June, 

>per, Grace Pearl A. B. . . . Aug., 

>per, U. Sidney Life Mar., 

nwell, Suzanne Hope Life Aug., 

Ogrove, Emily C Life June, 

Cder, Laila N Life June, 



mpton, John Edward Life June, 

wford, Zibbie L Life June, 

itz, Royal J Life Aug., 

Cttenden, Margaret L Life Dec, 

Oil, H. Fray Life Dec, 

Onenwett, William George. . .Life June, 

>ss, Asenath J Life Dec, 

>ss, Ethel Life June, 

>ss, Ola M Life June, 

>ssman, Bruno D Life Aug., 

Cimley, Marguerite E Life June, 

CIney, Edith Marie Life June, 

Cnmiskey, Maggie M Graded.. June, 

Epow, Nydia Life Mar., 

Crtis, Eva M Life Aug., 

Crtis, Marion Susan Life June, 

Crtis, Myrnetta Helena Life June, 

Ijiley, Helen Life Dec, 

Elton, Mary Elizabeth Life Mar., 

Iivey, Ruth Life Mar., 



'21 Horton 

'21 Evart 

'20 Morenci 

'20 Wheeler 

'21 Ann Arbor 

'21 Eaton Rapids 

'21 East Lansing 

'21 Tecumseh 

'21 Blaine 

'21 Port Huron 

'21 Vernon 

'21 Ludington 

'21 Fremont 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 Ida 

'21 Ida 

'21 Carland 

'21 Baraga 

'21 Bear Lake 

'21 St. Clair 

'21 Otisville 

'21 Charlotte 

'20 Ypsilanti 

'20 Adrian 

'21 Ida 

'20 Shelby 

'21 Detroit 

'21 Jackson 

'21 Detroit 

'21 Detroit 

'21 Owosso 

'21 Fowlerville 

'21 Stambaugh 

'21 Flint 

'21 Dansville 

'21 Dansville 

'20 Saginaw 

'21 Yankton, S. D. 

'21 Rives 



364 NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 

Davis, Blanche Alma Life June, '21 Bay City 

Davis, Jennie Life June, '21 Ypsilanti 

Davis, Luella E Life. .... June, '21 Ypsilanti 

Davis, Ninetta Mary Life Aug., '21 Ypsilanti 

Davison, Alice Magdalene Life June, '21 Brooklyn 

Davison, Pauline Life June, '21 Flint 

Day, Lee O B. S Aug., '21 Ypsilanti 

Day, Percival S A. B. . . . Dec, '20 Ypsilanti 

Dehn, Sister Mary DePaul Life Mar., '21 Nazareth 

Delaforce, Florence J Life June, '21 Milan 

Deland, Mrs. Harriet W Life Aug., '21 , Saginaw 

DeMarois, Eleanor L Graded. .June, '21 Calumet 

Densmore, Lucia M Life Dec, '20 Ypsilanti 

Densmore, Rhoda A Life Aug., '21 Oscoda 

Derbyshire, Anna H Life Aug., '21 Flint 

Depew, Myrtle E Graded.. Aug., '21 Caro 

DeRuiter, Margaret Life June, '21 Grand Rapids 

Deters, Caroline K Life Mar., '21 Ann Arbor 

Dodge, Sara Jane Life June, '21 Antioch, 111. 

Doering, Olga E Life Mar., '21 Grand Rapids 

Doig, Winnifred Life Dec, '20. . . Reading 

Dolan, Martha Ellen Life June, '21 Lansing 

Dooling, Gertrude Mary Life June, '21 . . . .Mishawaka, Incl. 

Dotson, Georgia Ferris Life Aug., '21 Detroit 

Downing, Lillian Life Aug., '21 Holly 

Doyle, Alice Clare Life Aug., '21 Grand Rapids 

Drake, Don D Life June, '21 Ypsilant 

Drapeau, Marie V Life June, '21 Freda 

Dreibelbis, Leslie R Life June, '21 Orangeville, 111. 

Driscoll, Aileen Catherine Life June, '21 Hubbcll 

Drodt, Norma Luella Life June, '21 Ida 

Drouyor, Dorothy E Life Aug., '21 Brooklyn 

Dubry, Mary E Life June, '21 Wyandotte 

Durance, William Life Dec, '20 Charlevoi> 

Durfee, Margaret Joyce Life Dec, '20 Dextoi 

Duval, Etta L Life June, '21 Grand Maraii 

Easton, M Alice Life June, '21 Port Huroi 

Edwards, Hazel K Life June, '21 Harrisvill* 

Eggert, Laura A Life Aug., '21 Saginav 



STUDENTS 



365 



lEilers, Marguerite A Graded. .Aug. 

Bieenmann, Warren Thomas. . .Life Aug. 

Erickson, Waive A Life June 

Everill, Florence G Life Aug. 

Swing, Doris Isabel Life June 

Eyler, Loren E Life June 

;Pair, Gertrude Graded . . June, 

Parr, Dorothy Life Aug. 

Farrish, Florence L Life Mar. 

JFay, Nettie Louise Life June 

Fearron, Rose C Life June 

Pelter, Ruth Aristeen Life June 

jPerris, Helen M Life June 

Pidler, Ruth E Life Dec. 

Fields, Clio G Life ..... June 

Pinan, Ann Life Dec 

Pinster, Edith Life Aug. 

Pischer, Fred C A. B. . . . June 

Pish, Eleanor Lee Life Aug. 

jFiss, Esther Louise Clara Life Dec. 

{Fleming, Mildred L Graded. . Aug. 

|Flynn, Helen K Life June 

Forsberg, Lela Marie Life June 

Foster, Ruth Mitchell Life June 

Fox, Doris M Life June ; 

Fox, Rachael Blanche Graded.. June, 

Franz, Pearle M Life Aug. 

Freed, Gertrude Lillian Life June 

Fry, Charlotte Winifred Life Dec 

Frye, Cornelia Life June, 

Fuller, Clarence R Graded. . June 

Fuller, Zoa Erma Life June 

Fulton, Dorothy Tucker Life June, 

3agnon, Harriet Flavia Life June 

. June 
. June, 
.Mar 
. June 
. June 



Jagnon, Melba A Life. 

Gtallup, Edna L Life. 

3arvey, Minette Life. 

^ary, LaVange M Life. 

3ault, Alma Marie Life. 



'21 Montague 

'21 Samaria 

'21 Onekama 

'21 Algonac 

'21 Grand Rapids 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 Orion 

'21 Levering 

'21 Ypsilanti 

'21 Holt 

'21 Sparta 

'21 Manitou Beach 

'21 Morenci 

'20 Ypsilanti 

'21 Fowlerville 

'20 Detroit 

'21 Port Huron 

'21 Belleville 

'21 Algonac 

'20 Albion 

'21 Cass City 

'21 Wapakoneta, O. 

'21. . North Bradley 

'21 Traverse City 

'21 Morenci 

'21 Fowler 

'21 Custer 

'21 Toledo, O. 

'20 Mason 

'21 . .New Richmond, O. 

'21 Milan 

'21 Hart 

'21. Cherry Run, W. Va. 

'21 Monroe 

'21 Rockland 

'21 Cambridge, O. 

'21 Alpena 

'21 Cement City 

'21 Flint 



366 



NORMAL COLLEGE YEAR BOOK 



Gayleard, Rhona Matilda Life Aug., 

Geyer, Eldon Cleo Life June, 

Gibbs, H. Britton Life Mar., 

Gibson, Mildred L Life June, 

Giffels, Clara Irene Life Aug., 

Giddings, Arthur E A. B. . . .Aug., 

Gilbert, Marian J Life Dec., 

Gilmaster, Ruth Life Aug., 

Gilson, Mabel E Life Jun